Graduated with Honors

APRIL, 2022. These graduate students completed the majority of the requirements to obtain honors, which included a 4.0 GPA, published works, recommendation from their respective advisors, patent a product, etc. Congratulations!

SUMMA CUM LAUDE
Paulette Leana Cheltenham
Master of Human Resources Management
Human Resources Management

Graduated with Distinction

APRIL, 2022. These graduate students completed their program with a high cumulative grade point average, which reflects the quality of performance within their respective major. Congratulations!

DISTINCTION
Georges J. Yared
Doctor of Philosop hy
Quantum Leadership in Public Health

DISTINCTION
Tulasi P Sitaula
Doctor of Management
Construction Management

Thesis defense

MARCH 31, 2022. Atlantic International University is delighted to share that the Thesis Defense of one of our students, Federico Cedeño Rivera from Panama, obtained an outstanding grade. The thesis (in Spanish) was titled, “How to prevent sports injuries in first year students of the School of Physical Education of the Autonomous University of Chiriquí, Panama.” The essential purpose of this study is to present a Sports Injury Prevention program to prepare students with theoretical- practical knowledge about injuries that can commonly occur in people who do some type of sport. This research also aims to motivate students to participate in the different sports activities that take place on the university campus. Federico completed a Doctorate Program in Physical Education at Atlantic International University.

17 TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON Design Principles & Practices

Call for Papers This Conference will be held 29-31 March 2023 at Polytechnic Institute of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal. We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/ interactive sessions, posters/ exhibits, colloquia, focused discussions, innovation showcases, virtual posters, or virtual lightning talks. 2023 Special Focus: “New Agendas for Design: Principles of Scale, Practices of Inclusion” Theme 1: Design education. Theme 2: Design in society. Theme 3: Designed objects. Theme 4: Visual design. Theme 5: Design management and professional practice. Theme 6: Architectonic, Spatial, and Environmental Design. Become a Presenter: 1. Submit a proposal 2. Review timeline 3. Register Advance proposal deadline May 29, 2022 Advance registration deadline June 29, 2022 Visit the website: https://designprinciplesandpractices. com

6TH IBERO - AMERICAN MEETING ON Application of Knowledge of Basic Sciences and their interrelationships in Clinical Practice

Call for Papers This Meeting will be held in virtual mode (Spanish) 23–24 June 2022 with the support of Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), FES Zaragoza, and RED IDEA. The objective is to bring together university professors, independent professionals and educational researchers interested in sharing their experience and knowledge regarding the importance in the application of basic sciences in clinical practice for the promotion of transdisciplinary thinking in the care of complex health problems. Contributions may be: 1. Communications. 2. Asynchronous digital video. 3. Conferences. 4. Workshop proposals (webinar) related to practical experiences or innovative products. 5. Presentation of books and dialogue with the author. The contributions obtained will be documented in an open and free distribution e-book in the context of the Open Educational Movement promoted by UNESCO. Participants will be invited to collaborate in this initiative to promote Open Science. Proposal deadline May 30, 2022 Visit the website: https://encuentroareabasicaypracticaclinica. weebly.com/

Thesis defense

APRIL 14, 2022. Atlantic International University is delighted to share that the Thesis Defense of one of our students, Kwasi Boateng, obtained an outstanding grade. The thesis was titled, “Creating a diaspora village in Ghana and its effects on the economy of Ghana.” Abstract: The owners and employees of the Diaspora African Forum were the primary focus of the research (DAF). Ten officials were selected from the Diaspora African Forum (DAF) on the basis of interviews with the organization’s owners and employees. Simple random sampling was adopted for the selection of respondents. ... The study discovered that the village is basically a community of both Ghanaian diaspora and other nationals. It was also found that there is the need for Africans especially in the Diaspora to work together to the country and the continent as a whole. Kwasi Boateng completed a Doctorate Program in Corporate Governance at AIU.

ASIC INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCES Virtual Conference & Award Ceremony

May 9 - 10, 2022. This year’s International Education Conference will be an entirely virtual event taking place on Zoom with tickets being purchased through the Eventbrite platform: https:// www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/asic-virtualconference- awards-ceremony- 2022-tickets-260957369517 Theme: Reflection, Re-evaluation, and Renaissance? New perspectives on hybrid pedagogy and the future of quality assurance in international education Keynote Speakers Prof Dr Ahmet Amin Mousa Cairo University Ambassador Dr Muwaffaq Ajlouni Farah International Centre for Strategic Studies Researches Amman Jordan AIU will have an important participation on this main event. Dr. Ricardo Gonzalez A. will be a guest speaker. Who should attend? • Managers/Leaders of Universities, Colleges, International Schools and Training Providers • Directors of International Recruitment and Staff • Heads of Quality Assurance and Teams • Marketing Managers • Ministry or government representatives tasked with improving their country’s education provision • Anyone with an interest in international education, quality assurance, and accreditation. For more information, visit: https://mailchi.mp/asic.org. uk/education-conferencedubai- 2022




Onésimo Nataniel da Cruz Camutali
Bachelor of Science
Civil Engineering
Angola
Danilo Ransay Joaquim Mabiala
Doctor of Business Administration
Business Management
Angola
Felister Sevidzem
Master of Business Administration
Health Care Administration
Cameroo n
Shamua Shayam Spencer
Bachelor of Education
Adult Education
Cayman Islands
Djimadoum-Yan Kayamou
Doctor of Health Economics
Business Management
Chad
Martha Teresa Gabot Burgos
Doctor of Literature
Linguistics and Literature
Dominican Republic
           
Felicia Méndez Rosa
Doctor of Social Science
Social Science
Dominican Republic
Eufracia Cristina Jiménez Almonte
Bachelor of Education
Elementary Education
Dominican Republic
Esther Altagracia García Mercado
Doctor of Educational Sciences
Educational Psychopedagogy
Dominican Republic
Hector Jaime Farinango Mendez
Master of Science
Microbiology
Ecuador
Domenica Desiree Calero Mejia
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Administration
Ecuador
Pedro Malavo Nsene
Bachelor of Business Administration
Project Management
Equatorial Guinea
           
Iván Ricardo Lobe
Bachelor of Science
Renewable Energy
Equatorial Guinea
Yakoub Abdi Isack
Master of Science
Public Health and Nutrition
Ethiop ia
Daniel Nii Arday Mensah
Master of Science
Electrical Engineering
Ghana
Francis Aabobreme Kofi Benon
Doctor of Arts
Organizational Development
Ghana
Jhon Jairo Moron Ojeda
Bachelor of Science
Civil Engineering
Guatemala
Hans Williams Monroy Morales
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Administration
Guatemala
           
Renita Farida Crandon-Duncan
Doctor of Education
Education
Guyana
Osman Yancarlo Rodriguez Lobo
Bachelor of Management
Aviation Management
Honduras
Phani Kanth Kosaraju
Master of Business Administration
Business Administration
India
Jane Nafula Sakwa
Bachelor of Science
Accounting
Kenya
Georges J. Yared
Doctor of Philosop hy
Quantum Leadership in Public Health
Leba non
Pedro Tomáz Muendane
Post-Doctorate of Business Management
Business Management
Mozambique
           
Albertina Castigo Mulandesa Juma
Bachelor of Science
Psychology
Mozambique
Berquelio Biquel Pereira Khossa
Bachelor of Economics
Economics
Mozambique
Iruansi Imonikhe Itoandon
Doctor of Business Administration
Business Administration
Nigeria
Taiwo Adejoke Odeyemi
Bachelor of Business Administration
Public Relations and Advertising
Nigeria
Agbor, Agbor Elemi
Doctor of Public Administration
Public Administration
Nigeria
Bolaji Peter Olanrewaju
Master of Science
Environmental Engineering
Nigeria
           
Ilechukwu Rosemary Chika
Doctor of Philosop hy
Economics
Nigeria
Sammy Olayemi Abel
Master of Science
Project Management
Nigeria
Osazuwa Izegbuwa Anthonia
Master of Science
Nutrition
Nigeria
Charles Nzasibenvo Nyameh
Master of Arts
Human Development
Nigeria
Eliseo Edgardo Jackson Hernandez
Bachelor of Science
Telecommunications
Panama
Virginia Y. Acevedo C.
Bachelor of Communications
Communications
Panama
           
Nestor Prado Huarmiyure
Certificate of Science
Psychology
Peru
Emad Abdulrazaq Sharqawi
Doctor of Science
Project Management
Saudi Arab ia
Eman Saud Saad Almutairi
Doctor of Science
Legal Studies
Saudi Arab ia
Mohamed A. E. Hasabarrasol Hasan
Master of Business Administration
Business Administration
Saudi Arab ia
Jean Hellen Gondwe Mwandira
Doctor of Project Management
Project Management
Sierra Leone
Morie Sylvester
Bachelor of Science
Civil Engineering
Sierra Leone
           
Wurie Jalloh
Bachelor of Science
Mechanical Engineering
Sierra Leone
Francisco Campillo Pérez
Doctor of Science
Food Science
Spa in
Temba Wiseman Gola
Doctor of Social Science
Social Science
South Africa
Nasima Joseph
Associate of Business Administration
Business Administration
St. Lucia West Indies
Yiying Liang
Master of Business Administration
Business Administration
Thailand
Erşan Asar
Bachelor of Human Resources
Human Resources Management
Türkiye
           
Semih Artün
Doctor of Arts
Project Management
Türkiye
Seda Özlem Özgöz
Doctor of Arts
Project Management
Türkiye
Xiomara Martinez De Noyes
Bachelor of Arts
Culinary Arts
Turks and Caicos Islands
Wilberforce Paddy Nahabwe
Doctor of Philosop hy
Project Management
Uganda
Malika Victoria Sweta
Doctor of Philosop hy
Public Health Administration
United Kingdom
Ana Maria Sencion Gil
Bachelor of Human and Social Studies
Psychology
US A
           
Rev. Peter Claver Sutinga
Doctor of Philosop hy
Organizational Development
US A
Durul Ediz Ciloglu
Master of Science
Renewable Energy
US A
Wandingi Karl Mbotake
Bachelor of Science
Political Science
US A
Marcelle Bianca Schaffrath
Bachelor of Science
Psychology
US A
Harry Folusho Akinola
Doctor of Management
Leadership and Org. Develop ment
US A
Tulasi P Sitaula
Doctor of Management
Construction Management
US A
           
Cesar Leonel Orellana Menendez
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Administration
US A
Carlos Julio Moya Tineo
Bachelor of Science
Electrical Engineering
US A
Ermaze Louis
Certificate of Social and Human Studies
English Language
US A
Paulette Leana Cheltenham
Master of Human Resources Management
Human Resources Management
West Indies
Betty Mutombo Mwanga Difand
Master of Business Management
Business Management
Zambia
Chileshe Selestino Kandondo
Doctor of Philosop hy
Public Administration
Zambia
           
Patricia Nkandu
Bachelor of Science
Psychology
Zambia
Martin Mutale
Bachelor of Science
Renewable Energy
Zambia
Victor Moyo
Doctor of Philosop hy
Strategic Management
Zimbabwe
     

Find More Graduates

Gallery: aiu.edu/Graduation/grids/currentgallery.html
Interviews: www.aiu.edu/Graduation/grids/interviews.html
This month we have graduates from: Angola · Cameroon · Cayman Islands · Chad · Dominican Republic · Ecuador · Equatorial Guinea · Ethiopia · Ghana · Guatemala · Guyana · Honduras · India · Kenya · Lebanon · Mozambique - Nigeria · Panama · Peru · Saudi Arabia · Sierra Leone · South Africa · Spain · St. Lucia West Indies · Thailand · Türkiye · Turks & Caicos Islands · Uganda · United Kingdom · USA · West Indies · Zambia · Zimbabwe


TESTIMONIALS

FIND MORE TESTIMONIALS FROM A I U STUDENTS HERE: www.aiu.edu/Testimonials.aspx



Abdirahman H. Osman Ahmed
Bachelor of Project Management
February 8, 2022
“The objective of my enrolment was to acquire a degree from a world-class university in order to advance my professional status. Over the past years, the learning journey has been quite exciting and productive... First of all, I began the journey with a review of resume that was conducted my Academic Advisor. As a result, I was awarded 80 credit based on my working experience in project management especially in the humanitarian field in Somalia. I have been working for several international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) operating in Somalia and have held numerous positions in project design and management. I have also attended a number training workshops in organizational management and project management. I have also been involved providing capacity building training to Somali NGOs staff members in project design and proposal development. Second, I have developed three book essays (Fractal Time, Building Social Business and In Defense of Globalization) intended to expand my understanding of international development ... READ FULL TEXT: https://www.aiu.edu/Testimonialdetail.html?It emID=1799&rcid=73&pcid=63&cid=73

Hobah Rogoto
Doctor of International Relations
February 10, 2022

“Atlantic International University is exceptional in its way of conducting andragogy and long-distance learning. Of course, my learning experience with AIU has been a little bit challenging, more stressful in peak periods yet exciting and rewarding. My endlessly sleepless nights were sometimes unbearable. No much time for socialization and hobbies. Being a busy professional with high workloads so often, I have had hard time in submitting assignments on due date. My life balance already seriously destabilized by the workload has been exacerbated by this new learning adventure. But with supporting, hands-on, and top-notch tutors and advisors, the workload has been alleviated both at workplace and in my learning journey. Over this tough and hard time, I came to notice that by focusing on the end result with solid motivation could provide energy and inner stimuli to overcome challenges and keep going. That was the clue. Nothing could drive me off track my degree. The originality of AIU is a self-made program designed for the student by ... READ FULL TEXT: https://www.aiu.edu/Testimonialdetail.html?It emID=1801&rcid=73&pcid=63&cid=73

Abdillahi Abdourahman Ahmed
Master of Accounting and Finance
February 14, 2022

“The main reason I joined this university was to enhance my education in the Finance sector, Mr. Renato, was my Tutor and his prompt reaction and involvement was the most excellent experience I had during my time with AIU. I also had a fantastic experience with my academic advisors, who assisted me in gaining more skills in writing assignments and conducting research throughout many financial fields. They all inspired me to continue on to the point where I graduated. Thank you again for all the wonderful work you have done!

Terence Chross
Master of Business Administration
February 16, 2022

“I am from Papua New Guinea. I completed Electrical Engineering in PNG Unitech but my hunger to get an MBA has gotten me to enroll in AIU. With work pressure and assignments deadlines, I was under pressure sometimes but I did learn to manage time and workload while studying. Studying with AIU has indeed thought me a lot business wise. I learnt some great management skills and how to manage company resources for greater profit. Moreover, how to control, organize and creating reliable system for future benefits is one of the important pieces I learnt. It was my first time studying online while working and I am very happy to have come this far. AIU Staff and my tutor have been very helpful and supportive. I am so thankful for the opportunity and new things I learnt as an AIU Student.

Byaruhanga Stephen Rwaheru
Doctor of Sustainable Energy Engineering
February 18, 2022

“My first months of the PhD program at AIU made me realise that my life was to change dramatically, and that doing PhD was something completely different to what I had experienced during my Master’s programme. My experiences have been amazing. ... Up to now, I am still discovering the opportunities the university offers me. ... READ FULL TEXT: https://www.aiu.edu/Testimonialdetail.html?It emID=1807&rcid=73&pcid=63&cid=73

Market forces in a managerial economics

Dr. Chuba Henry Okeke | Academic Advisor


Introduction Managerial Economics is not only valuable to managers of the Fortune 500 companies but it is also valuable to managers of non-for-profits organizations. Managerial economics is valuable to a manager of a food bank who must choose the best means to distribute food to the needy. It is also valuable to a coordinator of a shelter for the homeless whose primary goal is to help the highest possible number of the homeless given a very limited budget. Managerial economics provides important insights into every area of the business and nonbusiness world we live in, including household decision-making.

Managerial Economics Managerial economic, it is the study of how to direct the scarce resources in the manner that most efficiently achieves the managerial goal. Managerial economics is a broad field as it describes the methods that are useful for directing everything from the resources of a household to maximize a household welfare, to the resources of a company to maximize the company profits.

Market Forces: Demand and Supply Demand: the law of demand states that as the price of good falls (rises) and all other things remain constant, the quantity demanded of the good rises (falls) and the market demand curve is a curve indicating the total quantity of a product all consumers are willing and able to procure at each possible price, holding the prices of related products, income advertising and other variables constant. Demand shifters are variables other than the price of the products that influence demand, they include the consumer income, prices of related products, population, consumer expectation, health scares, advertising and consumer tastes. Supply, the market supply curve is a curve that indicates the total quantity of a product that all the producers in a competitive market would produce at each price holding input prices, technology and other variables affecting supply constant. Supply shifters are variables that affect the position of the supply curve and they include input prices, technology/government regulations, number of firms, substitutes in production taxes and producer expectations.

Consumer Behavior A consumer is an individual who purchases goods and services from companies for the purpose of consumption. A manager of a company should not only be interested in who purchases the goods and services but also in who consumes the goods and services. There are two important factors a manager must consider in characterizing the consumer behavior; 1. Consumer opportunities, they represent the possible services and goods that a consumer can afford to consume and 2. Consumer preferences, it determines which of these goods and services the consumer will consume.

Constraints Individuals face constraints in making decisions and the constraints can be legal constraints, time constraints, physical constraints and budget constraints (Budget constraints, it restricts consumer behaiour by mandating the consumer to select a bundle of goods and services that are affordable. The budget set is the bundles of goods and services the consumer can afford while the budget line is the bundles of good and services that exhaust the consumer’s income.)

The Production Function It is an engineering relation that defines the maximum amount of output that can be produced with a number set of inputs. Mathematically, the production function is defined as: Q = F (K, L) Q = the level of the output produced in the production process, K = the quantity of the capital and L = the quantity of labour. That is the maximum amount of output can be produced with K units of capital and L units of labour. The roles of a Manager in a firm is to use the available production function efficiently meaning that the manager must determine how much of each input to use to produce output.

Measures of Productivity One of the important components of the managerial decision making is the determination of the productivity of the inputs used in the manufacturing process. The three most important measures of the productivity are the average productivity, the total productivity and the marginal productivity. Total Product Total Product, TP is the maximum level of the output that can be produced with a fixed amount of the inputs. The production function defines the maximum amount of the output that can be produced with a fixed level of the input. If workers do not put maximum efforts, output will be low. Average Product Average Product AP, the AP of an input is the total product produced divided by the quantity used for the input. It is the major of the output produced per unit of the input. The average product of labour (APL) is APL = Q / L, while the average product of capital (APK) is APK = Q / K. Marginal Product The Marginal product of an input is the change in total output attribute to the last unit of the input. The marginal product of capital MPK Is the change in the total output divided by the change in capital: MPK = Change in Q / Change in K, while the marginal product of the labour MPL is the change in the total output divided by the change in the labour. MPL = Change in Q / Change in L.

The Cost Function The cost function summarizes information about the production process and it provides essential information the manager needs to determine the profit-maximizing level of the output. The cost function equally reduces the amount of information a manager has to process to make an optimal output decisions. Short-Run Costs The short run is defined as the period over which the amounts of some inputs are fixed. The manager is free to alter the use of variable inputs in the short run but the manager is struck with the existing levels of the fixed inputs. Inputs are costly whether fixed inputs or variable inputs, the total cost of producing an output is the short run consists of; • The cost of the fixed inputs and • The cost of the variable inputs Which are both components called fixed costs and variable costs. Fixed Costs FC These are the costs that do not vary with the output, they include the cost of the fixed inputs used in the production. Variable Costs These are the costs that change when the output is changed, they include the costs of the inputs that vary with the output. Short-Run Cost Function It is the function that defines the minimum possible cost of producing each output level when the variable factors are used in the cost minimizing fashion. It summarizes the minimum possible cost of producing the each level of the output when the variable factors are being employed in the cost minimizing way in the presence of the fixed factors of the production. Sunk Costs Sunk costs are costs that are lost forever after they have been paid. Sunk costs are irrelevant to decision making but they affect the calculations of the total profits. Long-Run Costs The manager is free to adjust all the levels of all inputs, as all the costs are variable in the long-run. The long run average cost curve is that curve that defines the minimum average cost of the producing alternative levels of the output allowing for optimal selection of both the fixed and the variable factors of the production.

Economies of Scale The economies of scale exist whenever the long-run average costs decline as the output increases while the Diseconomies of scale exist whenever the long-run average costs increase as the output increases. The multiple cost function is the function that defines cost of producing the given level of two or more types of outputs assuming all the inputs are used efficiently.

Economies of Scope The Economies of scope exist when the total cost of producing two different products within the same company is lower than when the products are being produced by separate companies. It exist when the total cost of producing P1 and P2 together is less than the total cost of producing P1 and P2 separately. That is C(P1) + C(P2) > C(P1+P2).

Cost Complementarity Cost complementarity exists when the marginal cost of producing one output is reduced when output of another product is increased.

Transaction Costs They are cost associated with acquiring of an input that are in excess amount paid to the input supplier. They play an important role in determining the optimal input procurement. The transaction costs of acquiring inputs are the costs of locating a seller of the input, negotiating the price at which the input will be procured and putting the input to use. The Transactions costs include: • Cost of looking for a supplier that is willing to see a given input. • Cost of negotiating the price at which an input will be procured. The costs may be in terms of the opportunity cost of time, legal fees and so forth. • Other investments cost and expenditures required facilitating the exchange.

Conclusion In the business world, success means winning in the market place no matter how you slice it. CEOs and the Managers in both large and small corporations including privately held firms, nonprofit organizations such as hospitals and universities, managers of any of these kinds of organizations cannot expect to make successful decisions without a clear understanding of how the market forces create both opportunities and constraints for businesses.

BIBLIOGRAPHY. Michael R. Baye and Jeffrey T. Prince, Ninth Edition. Managerial Economics and Business Strategy. • Thomas R. Christopher, Charles S. Maurice. Managerial Economics: Foundations of Business Analysis and Strategy.

Our present and our future

By Dr. Rosa Hilda Lora M. Advisor at AIU | [email protected]


We were looking forward to 2022 with great enthusiasm because the global problems generated in all aspects of human life, by the Covid-19 pandemic, seemed to leave this world. We are witnessing the presence of the new mutation of Covid-19 with less ferocity than the previous mutations. Society is currently occupied by the deficiency in the application of the vaccine in countries with less economic resources. Also create formulas for those who have not wanted to be vaccinated to prevent them from spreading the virus. Regardless of the problems generated by the virus in the world economy, we have a society that seemed to be doing well. We have a world of a lot of science and a lot of technology. The well-being that is seen is only for a part of the population.

Analyzes are made of the reasons why well-being doesn’t reach everyone. Education doesn’t reach its objectives because the curricular designs are made to support the governments in power. After World War II, although Russia was with the allies, they guided their system of government with a different policy from them. Also after the Great War, organizations were created so that the big problems could be resolved in an assembly and there would never be a world conflict again. Those organizations were: UN – United Nations Organization. October 24, 1945. UNESCO – United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. November 1945.

FAO – Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. October 1945. NATO – North Atlantic Organization. April 4, 1949. WHO – World Health Organization. April 7, 1948. IMF – International Monetary Fund. 1945. WB – World Bank. July 1945. The organizations mentioned are the most relevant. We are in 2022 and we have a conflict that can bring us a war with greater consequences than World War II. We are witnessing a conflict between Ukraine and Russia. We only have to answer the following questions and the future that we will have if we continue doing the same appears. 1. What does the Ukrainian territory have that is worth so much? 2. Why was the European Union (EU) dedicated to establishing commercial relations of such importance as the basis for its production with such a different political system? 3. After all the sanctions applied to Russia, the world will be the same again? 4. What political foundation should all society have? 5. Who benefits from authoritarian political systems? 6. Why do human beings with so much science and technology dedicate to generate situations that mean their death and that of the planet? 7. What will happen to the countries that came with food problems? 8. What will happen to education if these are the human beings that it has generated? 9. What has happened in History with those who are dedicated to sowing death? As human beings, as a society, it seems that we have to work hard to have a world where the fulfillment of each human being can be possible. Well-being comes from what we do. Well-being arise from everyday activities designed for the benefit of everyone We need to learn to identify well-being and abandon the belief that happiness is accumuling assets. Our planet can produce for the well-being of everyone but with our vision of happiness we have the results we now live. Well-being has to be for everyone, we only need to learn how to look for it: we need another education.

BIBLIOGRAPHY. UNESCO. Caminos hacia 2050 y más allá. Retrieved from: https://www.iesalc.unesco.org/wp-content/ uploads/2021/11/Pathways-to-2050-and-beyond_ESP-1.pdf UNESCO. Pensar más allá de los límites. Perspectivas sobre los futuros de la educación superior hasta 2050, 25 de mayo de 2021. Retrieved from: https://www.iesalc.unesco.org/2021/05/26/ informe-sobre-el-futuro-de-la-educacion-superior-preve-respuestas-colectivas-y-holisticas-a-los-retos-mundiales/



Learning

Pretending to be calm

It is not helping our children.

In the world of conscious, positive parenting, I have perceived the following messages. ‘We “should” always remain unruffled. When we show emotions like frustration, anger, sadness, and annoyance, we are giving our children power over us. We are showing them that they have control over our emotions.’ When our children activate one of our stronger (what is perceived as negative) emotions, and we deny that, THEN they have the power. It is only when we connect with ourselves and name our feelings that we reclaim our own power. Furthermore, pretending to be calm when we are clearly not can actually be more alarming to our children! Our brains are always scanning our environment looking for incongruencies, looking for things that don’t add up or make sense. Emotional incongruencies are something that the brain (yes, your child’s brain) is scanning for. So, if I am visibly angry (red face, shaking hands, nonverbal cues) but pretending to be calm (because I’m desperately trying to achieve that state), my child’s brain will actually see that and register me as a threat because of the incongruence. It says, “this doesn’t add up.” So, when we are attempting to look calm while our nonverbal language says we are upset, we may actually escalate our child. What we can do instead of pretending to be calm in the face of any and everything is to be honest with our children. ... Read full text:

New discovery

Dramatically rewrites history of life on earth, scientists say.

Scientists believe they have identified the oldest fossils on Earth, dating back at least 3.75 billion years and possibly even 4.2 billion years, in rocks found at a remote location in northern Québec, Canada, according to a new study. If the structures in these rocks are biological in origin, it would push the timeline of life on our planet back by 300 million years at a minimum, and could potentially show that the earliest known organisms are barely younger than Earth itself. Such a finding would have major implications for understanding the emergence of life on Earth, and could also inform the search for aliens on other worlds. These presumed microbial fossils were originally collected by Dominic Papineau, an associate professor in geochemistry and astrobiology (London), during a 2008 expedition to Québec’s Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt. They reported their discovery in a 2017 paper published in Nature ... In the years since then, Papineau and his colleagues have worked to bolster the case that the tantalizing structures are indeed early lifeforms that may have thrived near hydrothermal vents in Earth’s ancient oceans. The researchers report these “unprecedented” new findings, which potentially reveal “a diverse microbial ecosystem on the primordial Earth that may be common on other planetary bodies, including Mars,” in a study published in Science Advances. ... Read full text:


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Holoportation

NASA beamed a Doctor to the ISS in a world-first achievement.

In a first for telepresence communication, a NASA flight surgeon was ‘holoported’ to the International Space Station (ISS), appearing and conversing as a virtual presence in real time, hundreds of miles above the surface of Earth. If it sounds like Star Trek, you're not too far off. ... But this isn't science fiction. When NASA flight surgeon Josef Schmid was beamed up to the ISS in October of last year, the illusion was made possible thanks to Microsoft’s ‘holoportation’ technology, which lets users interact with 3D representations of remote participants in real time. “This is [a] completely new manner of human communication across vast distances,” says Schmid. “It is a brand-new way of human exploration, where our human entity is able to travel off the planet.” Unlike traditional holographic projections that appear to hover in the air for anybody to see, holoportation requires the use of an augmented reality headset, such as Microsoft’s HoloLens technology, for the wearer to be able to perceive (and interact with) the remotely captured individual(s), who are filmed with a multiple-camera setup in their actual location. In this case, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Pesquet, who was on board the ISS and wearing such a headset, had a two-way conversation with Schmid and members of his medical team, along with the CEO of AEXA Aerospace, which develops custom holoportation software ...
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We have a creativity problem

Outwardly, we praise innovation. Inwardly, we harbor a visceral aversion to it.

Research has found that we actually harbor an aversion to creators and creativity; subconsciously, we see creativity as noxious and disruptive, and as a recent study demonstrated, this bias can potentially discourage us from undertaking an innovative project or hiring a creative employee. “People actually have strong associations between the concept of creativity and other negative associations like vomit and poison,” said Jack Goncalo, a business professor at the University of Illinois and the lead author on the new study. “Agony was another one.” Dr. Goncalo has spent a decade studying the underlying factors that motivate and hinder creators. For instance, he and his co-authors have found that in some cases religious belief can limit a person’s creativity, and that creativity can provide a feeling of liberation to people who carry secrets. ... Creativity means change, without the certainty of desirable results. “We have an implicit belief the status quo is safe,” said Jennifer Mueller, a professor of management. ... the people invested in the status quo have plenty of incentive not to change. “Novel ideas have almost no upside for a middle manager —almost none,” she said. “The goal of a middle manager is meeting metrics of an existing paradigm.” ... Read full text


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Lytra

Shower leg prosthesis

This lower-limb prosthesis, created by industrial designer Harry Teng, offers amputees a safe, low-cost standing aid in the shower. It was designed to bridge the gap between traditional prostheses, which are expensive and generally not waterproof, and bathroom aids such as wall grips and shower stools that don’t help users with the most treacherous step —getting into the shower. Lytra is a prosthetic leg made from Proteus® Sheet (medical grade polypropylene). The sheets are molded into curvatures and assembled together to gain incredible strength as a unit. ... Visit: www.harry-teng.com Read full text:

Superadobe homes

By Iranian-American architect Nader Khalili.

Superadobe homes are estimated to last for centuries and are cost-effective to produce. The making of the new material also carries the potential of creating autonomy and better-paid jobs. Nader Khalili first proposed earthbag construction at a 1984 Nasa symposium that tasked participants to share ideas of how to build on the Moon and Mars, using material available onsite, as the costs of taking materials from Earth into space would be exorbitant. “When my dad gave that presentation, his case was that earth really is gold: 99% of the material that you need to build a shelter for yourself is on your own land. Talk about true sustainability and empowerment,” says Sheefteh Khalili, co-director of Cal-Earth Institute. A nonprofit that her late father founded in 1991, the institute teaches people how to build disaster-resistant, sustainable structures using earth-based architecture. Adobe is an earth-based material consisting of soil compacted with organic materials such as corn stalks, hay, and animal manure. It is one of the oldest building materials in the world, though its exact components can vary. Superadobe is also manufactured from earth and organic materials. But the mixture is fortified with lime, then compressed into polypropylene bags which are piled on top of each other, each heavy layer separated by barbed wire. Read full text

SQuRo

Robotic rat

Scientists from the Beijing Institute of Technology, China, set out to create a novel robotic rat —named ‘SQuRo’ (small-sized quadruped robotic rat)— that could serve as an agile adaption to perform multiple motions and carry payloads. This robot can perform a whole series of motions, including crouching-to-standing, walking, crawling, and turning, and can even recover from a fall by controlling its limbs and cervical parts to adjust its center of mass. The SQuRo demonstrated it was able to pass through an irregular narrow passage just 3.5 inches wide, cleared an obstacle of 1 inch, and went down a slope of 15° in a stable manner. Could this robot be the answer to rescue missions or transporting payloads to places that are hard to reach? Well, with it being much smaller than other similar robots, and the fact that it can carry up to 91% of its own weight, it certainly seems so. ... Read full text

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Everyday noises

...are making our brains noisier.

We have all experienced not noticing a sound until it goes away. Often it is an air conditioner or an idling truck. The air conditioner cycles off or the ignition is cut, and suddenly we “hear” the silence. And we sigh in relief. We momentarily revel in the peace until it starts up again or is replaced by the next aural annoyance. If our ears are not being damaged and we can mostly tune it out, should these noises concern us? We should indeed notice it and be concerned for the sake of our brains. ... Chronic noise exposure, such as might be experienced by individuals who live near an airport, can lead to an overall decrease in perceived quality of life, increased stress levels along with an increase in the stress hormone cortisol, problems with memory and learning, difficulty performing challenging tasks, and even stiffening of blood vessels and other cardiovascular diseases. According to the WHO, noise exposure and its secondary outcomes such as hypertension and reduced cognitive performance are estimated to account for an astounding number of years lost due to ill health, disability, or early death. ... A straightforward way to reduce noise is to use sound-isolating earplugs. Most are made of foam, and their one-size-fits-most design can work well ... Read full text:

The five foundations

...for neurodivergent people.

It is important to design accommodations in areas of impairment for neurodivergent children [ADHD, Autism, Dyspraxia, Dyslexia] because of the lack of consistent and supportive accommodations in their environment. When children interact with a world that is not designed for them, there is bound to be some struggle. By making accommodations we can reduce struggle and increase confidence, autonomy and self-determination. 1. Sensory Regulation. The ways that people’s brains process sensory input. ND people may process this information differently. This may be from not receiving or being bombarded with sensory information. ... 2. Emotional Regulation. How we process and respond to our environments through our emotions. ND children’s classrooms and homes may not be equipped to support a complex and deep level of emotional response. ... 3. Socialization. The ways in which we form connections with others. For ND children, it can look different. Some schools offer to reprogram their natural ways, which is not desirable ... 4. Communication. The way that people exchange information. Often times, ND children are forced to have verbal communication ... 5. Executive Function. The processes by which we manage and execute actions like packing a backpack, switching from working to listening ... Read full text:


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Eel River dam

Its removal will create California’s longest free-flowing river.

On April 14, PG&E’s 50-year license for the Eel River Dams expired, with the company opting against renewing the costly Potter Valley Project (PVP). ... Before the dam, the Eel hosted some of the most dramatic salmon and steelhead runs in California. The few remaining fish are now listed as threatened under the Federal Endangered Species Act. Because the dam prevents the normal, seasonal flushing of sediments in the river, the water is considered “impaired” under the Clean Water Act. ... Dams degrade water quality. They also block the rich nutrients brought into the habitat by spawning anadromous fish. The salmon and steelhead using our rivers for spawning have traveled and fed in thousands of miles of ocean water from as far away as Canada, Alaska or even Russia. When they die after spawning these exotic nutrients supercharge the ecosystem benefiting all forms of life. ... Dam removal is about much more than restoring endangered fish populations. ... Once streams are returned to their natural states, they are able to cleanse themselves, wash out all the sediments that smother aquatic plants, insects and fish. Improved water quality also impacts everything from associated wetlands to coastal beaches and estuaries. ... Not all dams are good candidates for removal, but enough of them are to feed a growing national movement to come up with win-win scenarios for fish, ecosystems and human ...
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Biocentrism

The unfolding miracle of life.

The term biocentrism encompasses all environmental ethics that “extend the status of moral object from human beings to all living things in nature”. Biocentric ethics calls for a rethinking of the relationship between humans and nature. It states that nature does not exist simply to be used or consumed by humans, but that humans are simply one species amongst many, and that because we are part of an ecosystem, any actions which negatively affect the living systems of which we are a part adversely affect us as well, whether or not we maintain a biocentric worldview. Biocentrists observe that all species have inherent value, and that humans are not “superior” to other species in a moral or ethical sense. The four main pillars of a biocentric outlook are: 1. Humans and all other species are members of Earth’s community. 2. All species are part of a system of interdependence. 3. All living organisms pursue their own “good” in their own ways. 4. Human beings are not inherently superior to other living things. Moment to moment, the world is kept alive only by the bacteria doing the basic work of life, which no one else can do, and by maintaining relationships more complex than any we could ever understand. We are all here only because of other beings. ... Read full text:

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Aid the living

...by finding out who died, in low-income countries.

Mr. [Augustine] Alpha and three colleagues will, over a few days, gather the details of every death that took place in the village of Funkoya [Sierra Leone] since 2020, using a process called an electronic verbal autopsy. The data they collect goes to the project’s head office at Njala University, in the town of Bo. There, a physician reviews the symptoms and description and classifies each death according to its cause. It is an extraordinarily labor-intensive way of establishing who has died, and how, but it’s necessary here because only a quarter of deaths in Sierra Leone are reported to a national vital statistics registry system, and none of the deaths have a cause assigned. Life expectancy here is just 54 years, and the vast majority of people die from preventable or treatable causes. But because there is no data about the deaths of its citizens, the government plans its programs and health care budget based on models and projections that are, ultimately, only best guesses. ... Vital statistics collection across the developing world is weak. ...nearly half of the people who die around the world each year do not have their deaths recorded. “There is no incentive in death registration,” said Prabhat Jha. He pioneered these kinds of efforts two decades ago in India; doing it now in Sierra Leone has shown that the model will work anywhere, and has helped bolster a government eager to root its policies in evidence and hard facts. ...
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Dolphin slaughters

...should end in Faroe Islands

The international animal rights group Sea Shepherd said it hopes that pressure will build from within the Faroe Islands to end its traditional drive of sea mammals into shallow water, where they are slaughtered for their meat and blubber. A local activist published gruesome video footage of Sunday’s slaughter of 1,428 white-sided dolphins on the central Faroese island of Eysturoy in the North Atlantic archipelago [September 12, 2021, see photo]. The number of dolphins was so large —much higher than in previous years— that it appears participants may not have been able to follow regulations to minimize the suffering of the mammals. “It was a complete disaster, completely unprecedented in fact, it could even be the largest single hunt of cetaceans in documented history anywhere in the world,” said Robert Read, campaign director for the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. Environmental activists have long claimed the practice is cruel. But this year even people on the Faroes who defend the four-century-old practice have spoken out amid fears that this year’s slaughter will draw unwanted attention. “We must admit that things did not go as we would like to,” said Hans Jacob Hermansen, the former chairman of the Faroese association behind the drives. “We are going to evaluate if anything went wrong ...
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Campus

Disabled is not a bad word

I’m a 41-year-old Disabled woman. I write it with a capital “D” because it’s something that I now identify as, and I identify as Disabled proudly too, but this wasn’t always the case. I was born with Spina Bifida in 1980. I met all the usual milestones like crawling and walking, just a little later than my toddling peers. And you wouldn’t have known I had a disability unless you saw the large lump on my lower back.

I was four years old when another child saw the lump and loudly exclaimed, “Ewwww, what’s that?” It’s funny, I can barely remember what I had for dinner yesterday, but the memory of someone pointing out that a part of me was somehow “wrong” has always stuck with me. My teenage years saw my Spina Bifida begin to appear in ways it hadn’t before. Spina Bifida causes the nerves in the spine to be a little tangled sometimes. Teenage years with their significant periods of growth can often exacerbate this. So, bladder weakness got worse for me, I began to develop random ulcers on my feet that wouldn’t heal, and we realised after much poking and prodding that I had minimal sensation in my legs. This led to frequent infections and hospital stays —stints on crutches and in a wheelchair, as well as some orthopedic shoes. God, I hated those shoes. When you’re 14, all you want to do is fit in and be cool. I was not into my regular and huge wide massive boot that I rocked for a bit. It’s funny. I wouldn’t care a carrot now, but teenage me, who didn’t have the greatest set of friends anyway, didn’t want to give anyone cause to laugh at her. I tried to balance it out by impressing people with my party trick —Kicking the wall as hard as I could because I couldn’t feel it. Yes, I ended up breaking my foot. As I got older, left school, moved out of my parents’ house, and became more autonomous, I often continued rejecting the idea that I was disabled… to my health’s detriment. I wouldn’t rest; I’d be discharged from hospital and go straight down the pub. And I once got my mate to help me cut the plaster cast off another broken foot so I could go out dancing. What an absolute menace. I claimed disability benefits, had a disabled parking badge, used mobility aids on and off but still couldn’t identify with being Disabled. I knew how people viewed disability, the pity, the awkwardness, the mocking. I didn’t want that for me. I didn’t want people to know I had Spina Bifida, to know that I was disabled. So, I kept it hidden as much as possible until a mobility aid became a permanent fixture in my life. My ableism still told me disabled was a “bad thing” to be, so I called myself “differently-abled,” which looking back on it now makes me want to vomit.

Two big things changed everything for me, and they both happened around the same time like a gorgeous gift from the universe. The first was discovering the Disabled community on Instagram. People proudly calling themselves Disabled, people rocking and looking fabulous with their mobility aids —the ones that I had always kept hidden in pictures because, you know, they made me “look disabled.” People sharing their stories, people calling out inaccessibility, people advocating for themselves, and people advocating for others in the community. People creating beautiful art, people supporting and validating each other. I found my community, and in doing so, I embraced a part of myself that I had always thought was wrong. The second event that changed everything was finding the Social Model of Disability; it allowed me to undo years of internalised ableism. It was like the moment after a terrible breakup when you realise it wasn’t you; it was them all along. I’d always thought my Spina Bifida was “bad.” Being disabled was “bad.” And somehow, being disabled was my fault or that I was an inconvenience and a burden. The Social Model disagrees. In contrast to the Medical Model, the Social Model states that, yes, I have a medical condition, but it’s the world that disables me. Now don’t get me wrong, that’s not to say that my Spina Bifida doesn’t come with pain and challenges. However, the societal challenges I face often disable me more than my actual disability. Put me in an accessible shopping center where my wheelchair can zoom around, and I won’t feel disabled in the same way that I do when I can’t physically get in somewhere because it doesn’t have a ramp. Or the ramp is so steep that I need help getting up and down it. I can’t walk, but my wheelchair solves this problem. It’s inaccessibility that’s the disabling thing. Inaccessibility isn’t just for wheelchair users either. Disabled people face a lack of access to adequate health care or a lack of access to communication like braille and captions, as just a couple of examples. There is a lack of quiet places, quiet times, or adequate seating in many busy public spaces. Think of how varied our disabilities are, yet most Disabled people have all probably come across people’s weird at best —hateful at worst— attitudes. These things cause me more hurt, inconvenience, and frustration than not walking ever does. If we had the same access to work, education, and social lives… If we were paid the same not less than our nondisabled counterparts, if we weren’t penalised for getting married, weren’t the subject of hate crimes, were fairly represented in the world of TV and media, if we all had access to decent health care, access to decent fare and livable social security, then maybe the word disabled wouldn’t even exist? That’s the thing, though. That’s where the Disabled community stems from. That’s the shared Disabled experience. Our conditions can be miles apart, yet we all understand without question what ableism is and the access barriers that come with it. When we deny Disability, when we try to soften it somehow by using terms like “differently- abled” and “handicapable,” we’re erasing the acknowledgment of societal barriers that Disabled people face. It erases an identity, erasing a community of diverse, brilliant people. I remember answering the tired old question of “What’s wrong with you?” with a “Nothing I’m Disabled” only to be met with a well-meaning yet icky “You’re definitely more abled than disabled.” Considering I can’t get into 50% of my local shops, I’d say that definitely isn’t true, Graham. I’ve found it’s often nondisabled people who are uncomfortable with the word “Disabled.” Considering how “disabled” is the subject of many an ableist slur to insult people, I’m not that surprised. Also, considering when disability is discussed in the mainstream, it’s often not Disabled voices; it’s usually someone who is disability adjacent —doctors or caregivers, etc. For example, “differentlyabled” and “special needs” are commonplace terms amongst parents and teachers of Disabled kids. So I’m also not surprised that many nondisabled people don’t know or can’t imagine that many Disabled people identify with being Disabled and that a thriving, diverse Disabled community even exists at all. Now, of course, Disabled people are not a monolith; the majority of my Disabled peers prefer identity-first language. When you slog for years undoing all the internalised ableism that told you that being disabled was a “bad thing,” you don’t want people to erase that. But of course, not everyone feels this way. Different disabilities and cultures can all impact whether we prefer identity or person-first language. And I would never question how someone chooses to identify themselves.

The idea behind using person-first language was to see the human behind the disability or the person before the disability. However, I would argue that I am still human with my disability. I would argue that my disability runs through all of me, every area of my life, in both positive and more challenging ways. I do not wish to separate myself from my disability because my disability is a neutral thing. My Disabled community isn’t a neutral thing, though. It’s bloody glorious. So, suppose you’re asking for a clear answer on which terminology (person-first language vs. identity-first language) is right or wrong. In that case, the answer is that there is no right or wrong answer. The exception is when nondisabled people decide that “disabled” is a bad word on behalf of the community. I’ve seen this often; to be inclusive, the term “disabled” is replaced with a gross little euphemism, and the Disabled people who try and educate around this are then completely ignored. Never do that.

The question presented is: How are businesses, companies, and organizations supposed to address Disabled people? I don’t think it’s very complicated —“Disabled people/ People with disabilities.” Use both —easy peasy lemon squeezy. And in the event you need to refer to someone as “being disabled” or “having a disability,” and you’re not sure which to use, ask. “Do you prefer Disabled or Person with a disability?” Amongst my peers, the majority of Disabled people are not uncomfortable with the word Disabled. Still, when you avoid it or try to somehow sugar coat it, it shows us that you are uncomfortable with it, and surely that means that actually, you’re uncomfortable with us?
Read full text by Nina Tame in collaboration with Disability Content Consulting:

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Adversarial T-Shirt.

Avoid detection with this t-shirt that make you invisible to most person detection and human surveillance systems. By el-em-cee. www.redbubble.com

Breezy Dome.

Cat backpack carrier. Ventilated, heat dissipated and sweatproof. Built-in lamp, fan, and mesh. Smart ventilation. petkit.com

Wishful thinking / Eye candy.

Dresses made of 100% cotton kitenge, left sourced in East Africa, right in Kenya. With functional pockets, button fastening through front. Airy fit, cut to be worn loose and stand away from the body. Mid-weight, nonstretchy fabric. Machine wash cold with like colors. www.shopzuri.com

Max Wilbert

“Many of you say ‘we’re not ready.’ Revolutions have been led by self-taught amateurs, by the poor and working people, by passionate individuals from all walks of life. Who is ever ready?”

Max Wilbert. Organizer, writer, and wilderness guide. Co-producer of a podcast called The Green Flame.

Good Advice

23. LEARN SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY
Have the mindset of a student. Never think you are too old to ask questions or know too much to learn something new. Source: www.inc.com


Bachelor's of Business Communication

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL AND HUMAN STUDIES

The Bachelor of Business Communication (BA) program objective is to help students develop an expert knowledge of the complexity and importance of communication processes, and an awareness of cultural and environmental issues. This program is offered online via distance learning. After evaluating both academic record and life experience, AIU staff working in conjunction with Faculty and Academic Advisors will assist students in setting up a custom-made program, designed on an individual basis. This flexibility to meet student needs is seldom found in other distance learning programs. Our online program does not require all students to take the same subjects/ courses, use the same books, or learning materials. Instead, the online Bachelor of Business Communication (BA) curriculum is designed individually by the student and academic advisor. It specifically addresses strengths and weaknesses with respect to market opportunities in the student’s major and intended field of work. Understanding that industry and geographic factors should influence the content of the curriculum instead of a standardized one-fits-all design is the hallmark of AIU’s unique approach to adult education. This philosophy addresses the dynamic and constantly changing environment of working professionals by helping adult students in reaching their professional and personal goals within the scope of the degree program.

Important:

Below is an example of the topics or areas you may develop and work on during your studies. By no means is it a complete or required list as AIU programs do not follow a standardized curriculum. It is meant solely as a reference point and example. Want to learn more about the curriculum design at AIU? Go ahead and visit our website, especially the Course and Curriculum section: http://aiu.edu/CourseCurriculum.html

Orientation Courses:

Communication & Investigation (Comprehensive Resume)
Organization Theory (Portfolio)
Experiential Learning (Autobiography)
Seminar Administrative Development (Book Summary)
Seminar Cultural Development (Practical Experience)
Seminar International Development (Publications)

Core Courses and Topics

Fundamentals of management
Legal environment of business
Business communication
Management information systems
Production and operations
Fundamentals of business finance
Strategic management
Business policy
Business presentations
Organizational communication
Fundamentals of business writing
Business communication contexts
Intercultural communication
Team communication
Intercultural Communications
Public Relations
Visual communications
Professional communication
Social media
Integrated marketing
Crisis communications
Communication for the creative
professional

Research Project

Bachelor Thesis Project
MBM300 Thesis Proposal
MBM302 Bachelor Thesis (5,000 words)

Publication

Each Bachelor graduate is encouraged to publish their research papers either online in the public domain or through professional journals and periodicals worldwide.

Contact us to get started

Each graduate is encouraged to publish their research papers either online in the public domain or through professional journals and periodicals worldwide

aiu.edu/apply-online.html

Pioneer Plaza/900 Fort Street Mall 410
Honolulu, HI 96813
800-993-0066 (Toll Free in US)
808-924-9567 (Internationally)


About Us

Accreditation

Atlantic International University offers distance learning degree programs for adult learners at bachelors, masters, and doctoral level. With self paced program taken online, AIU lifts the obstacles that keep professional adults from completing their educational goals. Programs are available throughout a wide range of majors and areas of study. All of this with a philosophically holistic approach towards education fitting within the balance of your life and acknowledging the key role each individual can play in their community, country, and the world. Atlantic International University is accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Schools, Colleges and Universities (ASIC). ASIC Accreditation is an internationally renowned quality standard for colleges and universities. Visit ASIC’s Directory of Accredited Colleges and Universities. ASIC is a member of CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG) in the USA, an approved accreditation body by the Ministerial Department of the Home Office in the UK, and is listed in the International Directory of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). The University is based in the United States and was established by corporate charter in 1998.

Our founding principles are based on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights; per article 26, AIU believes that Higher Education is a Human Right. The University has implemented a paradigm shifting educational model for its academic programs that have allowed it to move closer to this goal through the self-empowerment of its students, decentralization of the learning process, personalized open curriculum design, a sustainable learning model, developing 11 core elements of the Human Condition within MYAIU, and utilizing the quasi-infinite knowledge through the use of information technology combined with our own capacity to find solutions to all types of global issues, dynamic problems, and those of individuals and multidisciplinary teams. Due to these differentiations and the university’s mission, only a reputable accrediting agency with the vision and plasticity to integrate and adapt its processes around AIU’s proven and successful innovative programs could be selected. Unfortunately, the vast majority of accrediting agencies adhere to and follow obsolete processes and requirements that have outlived their usefulness and are in direct conflict with the university’s mission of offering a unique, dynamic, affordable, quality higher education to the nontraditional student (one who must work, study what he really needs for professional advancement, attend family issues, etc.). We believe that adopting outdated requirements and processes would impose increased financial burdens on students while severely limiting their opportunities to earn their degree and advance in all aspects. Thus, in selecting the ASIC as its accrediting agency, AIU ensured that its unique programs would not be transformed into a copy or clone of those offered by the 10,000+ colleges and universities around the world. Since ASIC is an international accrediting agency based outside the United States, we are required by statute HRS446E to place the following disclaimer: ATLANTIC INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY IS NOT ACCREDITED BY AN ACCREDITING AGENCY RECOGNIZED BY THE UNITED STATES SECRETARY OF EDUCATION. Note: In the United States and abroad, many licensing authorities require accredited degrees as the basis for eligibility for licensing.

In some cases, accredited colleges may not accept for transfer courses and degrees completed at unaccredited colleges, and some employers may require an accredited degree as a basis for eligibility for employment. Potential students should consider how the above may affect their interests, AIU respects the unique rules and regulations of each country and does not seek to influence the respective authorities. In the event that a prospective student wishes to carry out any government review or process in regards to his university degree, we recommend that the requirements of such are explored in detail with the relevant authorities by the prospective student as the university does not intervene in such processes. AIU students can be found in over 180 countries, they actively participate and volunteer in their communities as part of their academic program and have allocated thousands of service hours to diverse causes and initiatives. AIU programs follow the standards commonly used by colleges and universities in the United States with regards to the following: academic program structure, degree issued, transcript, and other graduation documents. AIU graduation documents can include an apostille and authentication from the US Department of State to facilitate their use internationally.

The AIU Difference

It is acknowledged that the act of learning is endogenous, (from within), rather than exogenous.

This fact is the underlying rationale for “Distance Learning”, in all of the programs offered by AIU. The combination of the underlying principles of student “self instruction”, (with guidance), collaborative development of curriculum unique to each student, and flexibility of time and place of study, provides the ideal learning environment to satisfy individual needs.

AIU is an institution of experiential learning and nontraditional education at a distance. There are no classrooms and attendance is not required.

Mission & Vision

MISSION:

To be a higher learning institution concerned about generating cultural development alternatives likely to be sustained in order to lead to a more efficient administration of the world village and its environment; exerting human and community rights through diversity with the ultimate goal of the satisfaction and evolution of the world.

VISION:

The empowerment of the individual towards the convergence of the world through a sustainable educational design based on andragogy and omniology.

Organizational Structure

Dr. Franklin Valcin
President/Academic Dean
Dr. José Mercado
Chief Executive Officer
Chairman of the Board of Trustees
Ricardo González, PhD
Provost
     
Dr. Ricardo Gonzalez
Chief Operation Officer
and MKT Director
Linda Collazo
Logistics Coordinator
Dr. Silvia Restorff
Academic Advisor
     
Dr. Miriam Garibaldi
Viceprovost for Research
Irina Ivashuk
Alumni Association
Coordinator
Dr. Prakash Menon
Academic Advisor
     
Dr. Ofelia Miller
Director of AIU
Clara Margalef
Director of Special Projects
of AIU
Carlos Aponte
Telecommunications
Coordinator
     
Juan Pablo Moreno
Director of Operations
David Jung
Corporate/Legal Counsel
Dr. Nilani Ljunggren De Silva
Academic Advisor
     
Paula Viera
Director of
Intelligence Systems
Bruce Kim
Advisor/Consultant
Dr. Scott Wilson
Academic Advisor
     
Felipe Gomez
Design Director / IT Supervisor
Thomas Kim
Corporate/
Accounting Counsel
Dr. Mohammad Shaidul Islam
Academic Advisor
     
Daritza Ysla
IT Coordinator
Camila Correa
Quality Assurance Coordinator
Dr. Edgar Colon
Academic Advisor
     
Nadeem Awan
Chief Programming Officer
Maricela Esparza
Administrative Coordinator
Deborah Rodriguez
Academic Tutor Coordinator
     
Dr. Jack Rosenzweig
Dean of Academic Affairs
Chris Benjamin
IT and Hosting Support
Cyndy Dominguez
Academic Tutor Coordinator
     
Dr. Edward Lambert
Academic Director
Mayra Bolivar
Accounting Coordinator
Kinmberly Diaz
Admissions Support Tutor
     
Dr. Ariadna Romero
Advisor Coordinator
Roberto Aldrett
Communications Coordinator
Amalia Aldrett
Admissions Coordinator
     
Nadia Gabaldon
Academic Coordinator
Giovanni Castillo
IT Support
Sandra Garcia
Admissions Coordinator
     
Jhanzaib Awan
Senior Programmer
Jaime Rotlewicz
Dean of Admissions
Jose Neuhaus
Admissions Support
     
Leonardo Salas
Human Resource Manager
Dr. Mario Rios
Academic Advisor
Junko Shimizu
Admissions Coordinator
     
Benjamin Joseph
IT and Technology Support
Michael Phillips
Registrar’s Office
Veronica Amuz
Admissions Coordinator
     
Rosie Perez
Finance Coordinator
Rene Cordon
Admissions Support
Alba Ochoa
Admissions Coordinator
     
Chris Soto
Admissions Counselor
Jenis Garcia
Admissions Counselor
 
     

FACULTY AND STAFF PAGE: www.aiu.edu/FacultyStaff.html


School of Business and Economics

The School of Business and Economics allows aspiring and practicing professionals, managers, and entrepreneurs in the private and public sectors to complete a self paced distance learning degree program of the highest academic standard. The ultimate goal is to empower learners and help them take advantage of the enormous array of resources from the world environment in order to eliminate the current continuum of poverty and limitations. Degree programs are designed for those students whose professional experience has been in business, marketing, administration, economics, finance and management.

Areas of Study:

Accounting, Advertising, Banking, Business Administration, Communications, Ecommerce, Finance, Foreign Affairs, Home Economics, Human Resources, International Business, International Finance, Investing, Globalization, Marketing, Management, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Public Administrations, Sustainable Development, Public Relations, Telecommunications, Tourism, Trade.

School of Social and Human Studies

The School of Social and Human Studies is focused on to the development of studies which instill a core commitment to building a society based on social and economic justice and enhancing opportunities for human well being. The founding principles lie on the basic right of education as outlined in the Declaration of Human Rights. We instill in our students a sense of confidence and self reliance in their ability to access the vast opportunities available through information channels, the world wide web, private, public, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organizations in an ever expanding global community. Degree programs are aimed towards those whose professional life has been related to social and human behavior, with the arts, or with cultural studies.

Areas of Study:

Psychology, International Affairs, Sociology, Political Sciences, Architecture, Legal Studies, Public Administration, Literature and languages, Art History, Ministry, African Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Asian Studies, European Studies, Islamic Studies, Religious Studies.

School of Science and Engineering

The School of Science and Engineering seeks to provide dynamic, integrated, and challenging degree programs designed for those whose experience is in industrial research, scientific production, engineering and the general sciences. Our system for research and education will keep us apace with the twenty-first century reach scientific advance in an environmentally and ecologically responsible manner to allow for the sustainability of the human population. We will foster among our students a demand for ethical behavior, an appreciation for diversity, an understanding of scientific investigation, knowledge of design innovation, a critical appreciation for the importance of technology and technological change for the advancement of humanity.

Areas of Study:

Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics, Communications, Petroleum Science, Information Technology, Telecommunications, Nutrition Science, Agricultural Science, Computer Science, Sports Science, Renewable Energy, Geology, Urban Planning.

Online Library Resources

With access to a global catalog created and maintained collectively by more than 9,000 participating institutions, AIU students have secured excellent research tools for their study programs.

The AIU online library contains over 2 billion records and over 300 million bibliographic records that are increasing day by day. The sources spanning thousands of years and virtually all forms of human expression. There are files of all kinds, from antique inscribed stones to e-books, form wax engravings to MP3s, DVDs and websites. In addition to the archives, the library AIU Online offers electronic access to more than 149,000 e-books, dozens of databases and more than 13 million full-text articles with pictures included. Being able to access 60 databases and 2393 periodicals with more than 18 million items, guarantees the information required to perform the assigned research project. Users will find that many files are enriched with artistic creations on the covers, indexes, reviews, summaries and other information.

The records usually have information attached from important libraries. The user can quickly assess the relevance of the information and decide if it is the right source.

Education on the 21st century

AIU is striving to regain the significance of the concept of education, which is rooted into the Latin “educare”, meaning “to pull out”, breaking loose from the paradigm of most 21st century universities with their focus on “digging and placing information” into students’ heads rather than teaching them to think. For AIU, the generation of “clones” that some traditional universities are spreading throughout the real world is one of the most salient reasons for today’s ills. In fact, students trained at those educational institutions never feel a desire to “change the world” or the current status quo; instead, they adjust to the environment, believe everything is fine, and are proud of it all.

IN A WORLD where knowledge and mostly information expire just like milk, we must reinvent university as a whole in which each student, as the key player, is UNIQUE within an intertwined environment. This century’s university must generate new knowledge bits although this may entail its separation from both the administrative bureaucracy and the faculty that evolve there as well. AIU thinks that a university should be increasingly integrated into the “real world”, society, the economy, and the holistic human being. As such, it should concentrate on its ultimate goal, which is the student, and get him/her deeply immersed into a daily praxis of paradigm shifts, along with the Internet and research, all these being presently accessible only to a small minority of the world community. AIU students must accomplish their self-learning mission while conceptualizing it as the core of daily life values through the type of experiences that lead to a human being’s progress when information is converted into education. The entire AIU family must think of the university as a setting that values diversity and talent in a way that trains mankind not only for the present but above all for a future that calls everyday for professionals who empower themselves in academic and professional areas highly in demand in our modern society. We shall not forget that, at AIU, students are responsible for discovering their own talents and potential, which they must auto-develop in such a way that the whole finish product opens up as a flower that blossoms every year more openly.

THE AIU STANCE is against the idea of the campus as a getaway from day-to-day pressure since we believe reality is the best potential-enhancer ever; one truly learns through thinking, brainstorming ideas, which leads to new solutions, and ultimately the rebirth of a human being fully integrated in a sustainable world environment. Self-learning is actualized more from within than a top-down vantage point, that is to say, to influence instead of requesting, ideas more than power. We need to create a society where solidarity, culture, life, not political or economic rationalism and more than techno structures, are prioritized. In short, the characteristics of AIU students and alumni remain independence, creativity, self-confidence, and ability to take risk towards new endeavors. This is about people’s worth based not on what they know but on what they do with what they know.

Read more at: www.aiu.edu

AIU Service

AIU offers educational opportunities in the USA to adults from around the world so that they can use their own potential to manage their personal, global cultural development. The foundational axis of our philosophy lies upon self-actualized knowledge and information, with no room for obsoleteness, which is embedded into a DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEM based on ANDRAGOGY and OMNIOLOGY. The ultimate goal of this paradigm is to empower learners and help them take advantage of the enormous array of resources from the world environment in order to eliminate the current continuum of poverty and limitations.

This will become a crude reality with respect for, and practice of, human and community rights through experiences, investigations, practicum work, and/ or examinations. Everything takes place in a setting that fosters diversity; with advisors and consultants with doctorate degrees and specializations in Human Development monitor learning processes, in addition to a worldwide web of colleagues and associations, so that they can reach the satisfaction and the progress of humanity with peace and harmony.

Contact us to get started

Now, it’s possible to earn your degree in the comfort of your own home. For additional information or to see if you qualify for admissions please contact us.

Pioneer Plaza / 900 Fort Street Mall 410 Honolulu, HI 96813
800-993-0066 (Toll Free in US) [email protected]
808-924-9567 (Internationally) www.aiu.edu

Online application:

https://www.aiu.edu/apply3_phone.aspx