Selected for reviewing

January 25, 2021. One of our graduates, Dr. Sivarajasingam Mahendran was selected to be a Review Member of the International Journal of Research and Analytical Reviews (IJRAR) on the 30th of October of 2020. Dr. Siva found the quality and standards adopted in their reviews to be high (ISSN and UGC Approved, 5.75 Impact Factor, refereed, peer reviewed and indexed journal). He will therefore be reviewing journal articles from around the world when he receives them from now on. Dr. Siva Mahendran has completed a Doctorate program in Education at Atlantic International University.

Video on child nurturing

February 16, 2021. One of our graduates, Karen Akwuobi, uploaded a YouTube video which is titled, “A Child nurtured in early age”. Description: The efficacy of positive parenting function at an early age. Parenting and it’s scientific correlation. Children whose mothers nurtured them early in life have brains with a larger hippocampus; (a key brain structure important to learning, memory and stress response). Find he video here: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=oc9h9b0Vw7A Karen Akwuobi has completed a Doctorate program in Clinical Psychology at Atlantic International University.

Seminar on iron bridges

January 27, 2021. One of our students, Nicanor Williams Pacheco Huamán, participated in a Conference with the company Stela Group where he presented his seminar “Puentes en Acero” where he speaks about his projects, curriculum, and more. The seminar is available to watch on YouTube. Find the link to his seminar here: https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=OgCGtR_ ZlTg&feature=youtu.be Nicanor Williams Pacheco Huamán is completing a Doctorate program in Mechanical Engineering in Atlantic International University.

Corporate member

February 12, 2021. One of our graduates, Osbert Grey, gained full registration to practice Architectural Engineering on account of: 1) His vast experience. 2) Validation by way of Degrees from AIU. He is also now a Corporate Member of the Jamaica Institution of Engineers (MJIE). Osbert Grey has completed a Master's program in Civil Engineering at Atlantic International University.

FIND MORE NEWS FROM AIU FAMILY
Latest News: www.aiu.edu/news.aspx
News Archive: aiu.edu/aiu2016/DownloadCenter.html

AIU students & Graduates
BREAKING PARADIGMS

AIU is proud to share with you some videos about members of our family. May you enjoy and be inspired by them

Dr. Emperador Pérez
Graduate
https://atlanticinternationaluniversity. screencasthost. com/watch/crVbbn9QoI

Dr. Jose Vicente Chang
Graduate
https://atlanticinternationaluniversity. scree

Martina Fabricci
Graduate
https://atlanticinternationaluniversity. screencasthost.com/ watch/crVwrKR3qc

Dr. Patricia Ikiriko
Graduate
https://atlanticinternationaluniversity. screencasthost. com/watch/crV3YL9kQO

Dr. Joel Ramos Leyva
Graduate
https://atlanticinternationaluniversity. screencasthost. com/watch/cYQeqjH0gi

Two articles published

February 9, 2021. One of our graduates, James Komolafe, has published two articles with Nature News–Nurturing a Living Environment. 1. “Leveraging Nature To Create The Atmosphere You Desire In 2021 And Beyond”. Abstract: As we approach the New Year, emphasis must be placed on leveraging the facilities of nature to create the atmosphere of choice and not just to settle for anything available. Nature cooperates with the natives who know! So, let begin by ascertaining what an atmosphere contains, conveys and connect in order to construct the ideal from the obvious. Know and master these 30 fundamentals about the atmosphere and harmonize with nature. ... Find this first article here: https://naturenews.africa/leveragingnature- to-create-the-atmosphereyou- desire-in-2021-and-beyond/ 2. “Native with nature: How to harmonize ‘nativity with nature’ for optimal productivity”. Abstract: Nature is what happens in us and around us and for us as natives. Being a native of a place means a biological and physiological existence finding and defining an origin from a certain place. As a matter of priority, we all began from the ground by nature as our origin. ... Find this second article here: https://naturenews.africa/native- with-nature-how-to-harmonizenativity- with-nature-for-optimalproductivity/ James Komolafe has completed a Doctorate program in Behavioral Health at AIU.

New qualification as CHRP

February 5, 2021. The World Academy for Research and Development in partnership with Edu UK informed AIU graduate, Isaac ZK Sasraku, that he was qualified for Certified Human Resource Professional (CHRP). He is now able to use the the title CHRP after his name and they also sent him a digital badge and certificate. Isaac ZK Sasraku completed a Bachelor’s program in Human Resources Management at Atlantic International University and is currently enrolled in a Master’s Program in Diplomacy and International Relations.

18TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social Sustainability

Call for Papers This Conference will be held 26–28 January 2022 at University of Granada (Faculty of Education), Granada, Spain. We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/ interactive sessions, posters/ exhibits, colloquia, focused discussions, innovation showcases, virtual posters, or virtual lightning talks. 2022 Special Focus: “Post-Pandemic Sustainability: Towards a green economic recovery for nature, people and planet” Theme 1: Ecological realities. Theme 2: Participatory process. Theme 3: Economic, social and cultural context. Theme 4: Education, assessment and policy. Become a Presenter: 1. Submit a proposal 2. Review timeline 3. Register Advance proposal deadline 26 Mar 2021 Advance registration deadline 26 Apr 2021 Visit the website: https://onsustainability.com
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Honors

February, 2021. These graduate students completed the majority of the requirements to obtain honors, which included a 4.0 GPA, published works, recommendation from their respective advisors, patent a product, etc. Congratulations to all of them!
SUMMA CUM LAUDE
Cristian Perdomo Hernández
Doctor of Political Science
Electoral Studies

CUM LAUDE
María Cristina Ferrari
Doctor of Science
Public Health
CUM LAUDE
Oscar Alejandro Lopera Calle
Doctor of Education
Education

CUM LAUDE
Mahvell N-L. Charlton-Brown
Doctor of Philosophy
App lied Linguistics

CUM LAUDE
Eric Filor Nagbe
Doctor of Philosophy
Accounting

CUM LAUDE
Arthur T. Johnson
Doctor of Philosophy
Legal Studies
CUM LAUDE
James Komolafe
Doctor of Philosophy
Beh avioral Health

CUM LAUDE
Osvaldo Abiud Díaz Torres
Bachelor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
CUM LAUDE
Roberto Molinar Ríos
Doctor of Accounting
Accounting and Comptroller
CUM LAUDE
Cary Hermo Beatisula
Doctor of Philosophy
Geotechnical Enginee ring




José Caetano Gomes
Bache lor of Science
Public Health
Angola
Nicolau Londe Gomes Miguel
Bache lor of Business Administration
Business Administration
Angola
Joao Arceno Mendes
Bache lor of Science
Industrial Enginee ring
Angola
Lisandro Martínez Bovier
Bache lor of Science
Systems Enginee ring
Argentina
María Cristina Ferrari
Doctor of Science
Public Health
Argentina
Elizabeth Maria Barr Clyde
Bache lor of Business Administration
Business Administration Management
Bahamas
           
Tina Dianna Forbes-Rasmussen
Ass ociate of Science
Public Health and Nutrition
Bahamas
Osmin Kevin Sarceno
Bache lor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Belize
Alejandro Valeriano Ruiz
Bache lor of Science
Electrical Enginee ring
Bolivia
Moanamisi Tawana
Bache lor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Botswana
Abiyah Coretta Esango Epse Mimba
Doctor of Business Administration
Human Resources
Cameroon
Alain J Painchaud
Doctor of Physics
Modern The rmodynamics of Sys. of V. S.
Canada
           
Walter Mauricio Flores Véliz
Bache lor of Science
Geology
Chile
Chestin Tatiana Carstens Vásquez
Doctor of Education
Education
Chile
Maribel Diaz Isaza
Bache lor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Colombia
Oscar Alejandro Lopera Calle
Doctor of Education
Education
Colombia
Yhonatan Estiben Batero Agudelo
Bache lor of Science
Mechanical Enginee ring
Colombia
Dominique Bagula Burume Matière
Bache lor of Business Administration
Business and Management
Democratic Rep ublic of Congo
           
Andy Numbi Ngoy
Doctor of Science
Microbiology
Democratic Rep ublic of Congo
Kasongo Nguba Joseph
Doctor of Philosoph y
Project and Financial Management
Democratic Rep ublic of Congo
Kiwa Wane Papy
Doctor of Philosoph y
Project and Financial Management
Democratic Rep ublic of Congo
Daniel Elías Robles Robinson
Bache lor of Computer Science
Information Security
Dominican Rep ublic
Ángela del Carmen Espinal Veras
Doctor of Human Res ources
Human Resources
Dominican Rep ublic
Angel Gilberto Peña de la Rosa
Bache lor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Dominican Rep ublic
           
Roque Juan Nuñez
Bache lor of Education
Educational Psychology
Dominican Rep ublic
Cristian Perdomo Hernández
Doctor of Political Science
Electoral Studies
Dominican Rep ublic
Juan Fabrizio Tirry
Doctor of Education
Scientific Investigation Methodology
Dominican Rep ublic
Ana Manuela Palma Avellán
Doctor of Business Administration
Business Administration
Ecuador
Jose Antonio Huerta Nivelo
Bache lor of Science
Animal Science
Ecuador
Ester Carolina Robles Veliz
Bache lor of Science
Nutrition, Diet and Aesthe tics
Ecuador
           
Juan José Owono Okiri Nkoho
Master of Science
Public Health
Equatorial Guinea
Javier Nguema Onguene
Bache lor of International Relations
International Relations
Equatorial Guinea
Mark Yaw Taylor
Master of Business Administration
Business Administration
France
Mayra Elizabeth Santizo Galdamez
Bache lor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Guatemala
Pedro Luis Flette Eastsan
Bache lor of Physics
Physics
Guatemala
Amadita Pinzón Almendra
Bache lor of Science
Psychology
Guatemala
           
Juan Carlos Valdez Sandoval
Post-Doctorate of Business Administration
Business Administration
Guatemala
Harouna Traore
Certificate
Certificate of Management
Guinea
Nadine McIntosh-Ramsarran
Doctor of Philosoph y
Clinical Psychology
Guyana
Rocheny Sifrain
Doctor of Philosoph y
Finance
Haiti
Pierre Bernadin Jean Laurent
Bache lor of Communications
Communications
Haiti
Rosa Elena España Portillo
Bache lor of Science
Information Technology
Honduras
           
Malcom Josue Bonilla Reyes
Bache lor of Science
Psychology
Honduras
Eva Celestina Fernandez Rodriguez
Bache lor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Honduras
V.V.L.N. Sastry
Post-Doctorate of Economics
Economics
India
Isaac Devakumar
Doctor of Philosoph y
Mathe matics
India
Claudia P. Barrientos Cámbara de Pérez
Master of Intl. Business Management
Economic Development Coope ration
Italy
Mahvell Neisha-Lois Charlton-Brown
Doctor of Philosoph y
App lied Linguistics
Jamaica
           
Dennis Gachamba
Bache lor of Science
Information Technology
Kenya
Stella Adhiambo Agara
Bache lor of Science
International Relations and Diplomacy
Kenya
Mark Mungai Ng'ang'a
Doctor of Philosoph y
Educational Administration
Kenya
Badriya AlGhanim
Bache lor of Accounting
Accounting
Kuwait
Norma Hajj
Bache lor of Education
Education
Kuwait
Eric Filor Nagbe
Doctor of Philosoph y
Accounting
Liberia
           
Mohamed Bah
Bache lor of Business Administration
Business Administration
Liberia
Trokon Rockefeller Jackson
Doctor of Philosoph y
Education Leadership Management
Liberia
Arthur T. Johnson
Doctor of Philosoph y
Legal Studies
Liberia
Aaron Austin Phiri
Master of Science
Public Health
Malawi
Kone Djakalia
Bache lor of Business Administration
Business Management
Mali
Harouna Traore
Master of International Relations
Business and Economics
Mali
           
Víctor M. Leonardo Gudiño González
Doctor of Architecture
Urbanism
Mexico
Ramón Alejandro Orozco Meráz
Master of Social and Human Studies
Spirituality
Mexico
María Lourdes Díaz González Borja
Doctor of Education
Education
Mexico
Shittu Sheriff Bamidele
Bache lor of Science
Industrial Enginee ring
Nigeria
Joseph Magaji Azi
Doctor of Business Administration
Public Financial Management
Nigeria
Nwose, Raymond Chukwuneku
Bache lor of Science
Electrical Enginee ring
Nigeria
           
Adepoju Adeyinka Adebayo
Master of Science
Mechanical Enginee ring
Nigeria
Onazi Enyi Moses
Doctor of Philosoph y
International Health
Nigeria
James Iorchir Demenongu Demshakwa
Doctor of Science
Architecture
Nigeria
Essien, Essien Lawrence
Master of Science
Public Health
Nigeria
Silvia Osaigbovo Tagbo-Okeke
Doctor of Philosoph y
Project Management
Nigeria
Matthew Omovidolor Ebireri
Doctor of Safety and Risk Management
Safety and Risk Management
Nigeria
           
Anju Ganglani
Master of Education
Educational Psychology
Nigeria
Obaroh, Rebbecca Yemi
Bache lor of Human Res ources
Human Resources
Nigeria
Emmanuel Iornenge Chenge
Doctor of Human Res ources
Human Resources
Nigeria
James Komolafe
Doctor of Philosoph y
Beh avioral Health
Nigeria
Chukwu Raymond Emeka
Doctor of Business Management
Business Management
Nigeria
Bashir Abdulmumin
Ass ociate of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Nigeria
           
Folasade Adunni Coker
Doctor of Taxation
Taxation
Nigeria
Ogbuti Godfrey Emeka
Doctor of Philosoph y
Criminology
Nigeria
Adedoyin Adeola Olubunmi
Doctor of Science
Telecommunications
Nigeria
Ysahaq Gebrechristos
Bache lor of Science
Computer Science
Norway
Osvaldo Abiud Díaz Torres
Bache lor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Panama
Emiliano Ríos Vega
Doctor of Tourism
Tourism
Panama
           
Roberto Molinar Ríos
Doctor of Accounting
Accounting and Comptroller
Panama
Alphonse Kee Domki Ali
Master of Economics
Strategic Management
Papua New Guinea
Ramiro Concha Lopez
Bache lor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Peru
Santos Ricardo Tarazona Maza
Master of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Peru
Harold Edward Arce Espinoza
Bache lor of Business Administration
Business Administration
Peru
Cary Hermo Beatisula
Doctor of Philosoph y
Geotechnical Enginee ring
Philipp ines
           
Theresa McDermott Santiago
Master of Human Res ources
Human Resources
Puerto Rico
Theresa McDermott Santiago
Doctor of Philosoph y
Gerontology
Puerto Rico
Sheila Montes Peña
Doctor of Education
Educational Administration
Puerto Rico
Luis Mariano Crespo Ortiz
Doctor of Education
Education
Puerto Rico
Edil G. Trabal Lebrón
Doctor of Science
Public Health
Puerto Rico
Elizabeth Torres Alvarado
Doctor of Business Administration
International Business
Puerto Rico
           
Peter Echesirim Anozie
Doctor of Arts
Sociology
Russ ia
Felix Ideva
Bache lor of Business Administration
Project Management
Senegal
Michelle Louise Parkin
Doctor of Science
Nutrition
South Africa
Lungani Philemon Khwetshube
Certificate of Social and Human Studies
Legal Studies
South Africa
Jaqueline Koning
Doctor of Business and Economics
International Human Rights
South Africa
Robert Regnard
Bache lor of Arts
Business Management
South Africa
           
Nadine Badenhorst
Bache lor of Science
International Trade
South Africa
James Ajuong Arou
Doctor of Science
Business Administration and Management
South Sudan
Bastiyan K. A. Manisha Sweene Rodrigo
Doctor of Philosoph y
Business Administration
Sri Lanka
Navin Riteshkumar Ruben Samoedj
Doctor of Human Res ource Management
Human Resource Management
Suriname
Shalinie Ramotar
Bache lor of Science
Che mical Enginee ring
Suriname
Ijeoma Lauretha Madumere
Bache lor of Business Administration
Business Management
Switzerland
           
Shaban Ramadhani
Bache lor of Proje ct Management
Project Management
Tanzania
Ayse Serra Yücel
Bache lor of Science
Nutrition Science
Turkey
Hussein Omar Hussein
Bache lor of Management
Project Management
Uganda
Muleebwa Joseph
Bache lor of Science
Public Health
Uganda
Norbert Hakisimana Atanyo Konga
Doctor of Legal Studies
Social Sciences
United Kingdom
Sharderzer Harper
Bache lor of Legal Studies
Legal Studies
USA
           
Leonardo C. L. Dias
Bache lor of Business Administration
International Business Management
USA
Mark Jose Gonzales
Doctor of Business Administration
Business Administration
USA
Franco Egbe
Master of Science
Civil Enginee ring
USA
Luis Miguel Gonzalez Lugo
Bache lor of Science
Information Technology
Venezuela
Christine Lubasi Mwanambuyu
Doctor of Philosoph y
Linguistics
Zambia
Mathews Allan Chilapa
Bache lor of Science
Electrical Enginee ring
Zambia
           
Itai Andrew Mawonde
Master of Business Administration
Business Administration
Zimbabwe
Gabriel Kabanda
Post-Doctorate of Science
Computer Science
Zimbabwe
       
           

Find More Graduates

Gallery: aiu.edu/Graduation/grids/currentgallery.html
Interviews: www.aiu.edu/Graduation/grids/interviews.html
This month we have graduates from: Angola · Argentina · Bahamas · Belize · Bolivia · Botswana · Cameroon · Canada · Chile · Colombia · DRC · Dominican Republic · Ecuador · Equatorial Guin France · Guatemala · Guinea · Guyana · Haiti · Honduras · India · Italy · Jamaica · Kenya · Kuwait · Liberia · Malawi · Mali · Mexico · Nigeria · Norway · Panama · Papua New Guinea · Peru · Philippines · Puer to Rico · Russia · Senegal · South Africa · South Sudan · Sri Lanka · Suriname · Switzerland · Tanzania · Turkey · Uganda · United Kingdom · USA · Venezuela · Zambia · Zimbabwe


EDUCATION A fundamental global priority

Emmanuel W. Kofa | Master of Legal Studies



Introduction Basic research and excellent academic presentation will always be the work of contemporary scholars as it enables them to properly critique and possibly analyzed past and present issues of complexity and thus, provide amicable solutions to critical issues to save the incoming generations. When people opt for change, it is obvious that such change is aimed at correcting the wrongs of the past. In ancient past, generation upon generation did not experience technological skill and advancement as modern epoch does. This is due to the level of advance education we have today.

According to Wikipedia, Education is however the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include teaching, training, storytelling, discussion and directed research. Education frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, however learners can also educate themselves. Education can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational. A right to education has been recognized by some governments and the United Nations. In most regions, education is compulsory up to a certain age. There is a movement for education reform, and in particular for evidencebased education with global initiatives aimed at achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 4, which promotes quality education for all. Education began in prehistory, as adults trained the young in the knowledge and skills deemed necessary in their society. In pre-literate societies, this was achieved orally and through imitation. Story-telling passed knowledge, values, and skills from one generation to the next. As cultures began to extend their knowledge beyond skills that could be readily learned through imitation, formal education developed. Schools existed in Egypt at the time of the Middle Kingdom.

Plato founded the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in Europe. The city of Alexandria in Egypt, established in 330 BCE, became the successor to Athens as the intellectual cradle of Ancient Greece. There, the great Library of Alexandria was built in the 3rd century BCE. European civilizations suffered a collapse of literacy and organization following the fall of Rome in CE 476.

In China, Confucius (551–479 BCE), of the State of Lu, was the country’s most influential ancient philosopher, whose educational outlook continues to influence the societies of China and neighboring Korea, Japan, and Vietnam. Confucius gathered disciples and searched in vain for a ruler who would adopt his ideals for good governance, but his Analects were written down by followers and have continued to influence education in East Asia into the modern era. The Aztecs also had a welldeveloped theory about education, which has an equivalent word in Nahuatl called tlacahuapahualiztli. It means “the art of raising or educating a person”, or “the art of strengthening or bringing up men”. This was a broad conceptualization of education, which prescribed that it begins at home, supported by formal schooling, and reinforced by community living. Historians cite that formal education was mandatory for everyone regardless of social class and gender. There was also the word neixtlamachiliztli, which means “the act of giving wisdom to the face”. In essence, these concepts underscore a complex set of educational practices, which was oriented towards communicating to the next generation the experience and intellectual heritage of the past for the purpose of individual development and his integration into the community.

In the quest to foster and direct the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms toward individual integration into the community, a means to promote national and global coherence, the document on the Universal Declaration of Human right was adopted on Friday, December 10, 1948 in Paris, France. This which means all men are equal and must have freedom to exercise their inherent and inalienable rights. The right to live, to peace including the human right to education.

Upon this backdropped, this article derives from a more concern with the contemporary global situation of education as a human right that should be considered a fundamental global priority. It places major emphasis on the human right to education, a means to derive a healthy planet as enshrined in the charter of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It delves into the past only because otherwise, it would be highly impossible to understand how the present came into being and what the trends are like for the near future. In the search for an understanding of what is education and what makes it a fundamental human right, the limits of enquiry had to be fixed as far back at the 3rd century BCE on the one hand, and the twenty first century on the other hand.

Background According to Wikipedia, Education is however the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include teaching, training, storytelling, discussion and directed research. Education frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, however learners can also educate themselves. Education can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational. A right to education has been recognized by some governments and the United Nations. In most regions, education is compulsory up to a certain age. There is a movement for education reform, and in particular for evidence-based education with global initiatives aimed at achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 4, which promotes quality education for all.

Education began in prehistory, as adults trained the young in the knowledge and skills deemed necessary in their society. In pre-literate societies, this was achieved orally and through imitation. Story-telling passed knowledge, values, and skills from one generation to the next. As cultures began to extend their knowledge beyond skills that could be readily learned through imitation, formal education developed. Schools existed in Egypt at the time of the Middle Kingdom.

Plato founded the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in Europe. The city of Alexandria in Egypt, established in 330 BCE, became the successor to Athens as the intellectual cradle of Ancient Greece. There, the great Library of Alexandria was built in the 3rd century BCE. European civilizations suffered a collapse of literacy and organization following the fall of Rome in CE 476.

In China, Confucius (551–479 BCE), of the State of Lu, was the country’s most influential ancient philosopher, whose educational outlook continues to influence the societies of China and neighboring Korea, Japan, and Vietnam. Confucius gathered disciples and searched in vain for a ruler who would adopt his ideals for good governance, but his Analects were written down by followers and have continued to influence education in East Asia into the modern era.

After the Fall of Rome, the Catholic Church became the sole preserver of literate scholarship in Western Europe. The church established cathedral schools in the Early Middle Ages as centres of advanced education. Some of these establishments ultimately evolved into medieval universities and forebears of many of Europe’s modern universities. During the High Middle Ages, Chartres Cathedral operated the famous and influential Chartres Cathedral School. The medieval universities of Western Christendom were well-integrated across all of Western Europe, encouraged freedom of inquiry, and produced a great variety of fine scholars and natural philosophers, including Thomas Aquinas of the University of Naples, Robert Grosseteste of the University of Oxford, an early expositor of a systematic method of scientific experimentation, and Saint Albert the Great, a pioneer of biological field research. Founded in 1088, the University of Bologne is considered the first, and the oldest continually operating university. Elsewhere during the Middle Ages, Islamic science and mathematics flourished under the Islamic caliphate which was established across the Middle East, extending from the Iberian Peninsula in the west to the Indus in the east and to the Almoravid Dynasty and Mali Empire in the south. In most countries today, full-time education, whether at school or otherwise, is compulsory for all children up to a certain age. Due to this the proliferation of compulsory education, combined with population growth, UNESCO has calculated that in the next 30 years more people will receive formal education than in all of human history thus far.

Formal education occurs in a structured environment whose explicit purpose is teaching students. Usually, formal education takes place in a school environment with classrooms of multiple students learning together with a trained, certified teacher of the subject. The International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) was created by UNESCO as a statistical base to compare education systems. In 1997, it defined 7 levels of education and 25 fields, though the fields were later separated out to form a different project. Modern educational program begins from the early childhood level, primary, secondary and higher education as well as vocational education1.

Content of the right to education Indeed, the right to education encompasses both entitlements and freedoms, including the following: • Right to free and compulsory primary education. • Right to available and accessible secondary education (including technical and vocational education and training), made progressively free. • Right to equal access to higher education on the basis of capacity made progressively free. • Right to fundamental education for those who have not received or completed primary education. • Right to quality education both in public and private schools. • Freedom of parents to choose schools for their children which are in conformity with their religious and moral convictions. • Freedom of individuals and bodies to establish and direct education institutions in conformity with minimum standards established by the state. • Academic freedom of teachers and students2. There were 4As developed by the first UN Special Rapporteur on the right to education, and adopted by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in its General Comment 13 on the right to education (1999, para.6). These 4As indicate that education should be available, accessible, acceptable and adaptable. To be a meaningful right, education in all its forms and at all levels shall exhibit these interrelated and essential features:

Available– Education is free and there is adequate infrastructure and trained teachers able to support the delivery of education. Accessible– The education system is non-discriminatory and accessible to all, and positive steps are taken to include the most marginalized. Acceptable– The content of education is relevant, nondiscriminatory and culturally appropriate, and of quality; schools are safe, and teachers are professional. Adaptable– Education evolves with the changing needs of society and challenges inequalities, such as gender discrimination; education adapts to suit locally specific needs and contexts Obligation of states to education as a human right: States are therefore under obligations to respect, protect, and fulfil this right. To respect means to refrain from interfering with the enjoyment of the right (e.g., the state must respect the liberty of parents to choose schools for their children. To protect means to prevent others from interfering with the enjoyment of the right usually through regulation and legal guarantees (e.g., the state must ensure that third parties, including parents, do not prevent girls from going to school). To fulfil means to adopt appropriate measures towards the full realization of the right to education (e.g., the state must take positive measures to ensure that education is culturally appropriate for minorities and indigenous peoples, and of good quality for all). However, no matter how limited resources are, all states have immediate obligations to implement the following aspects of right to education: 1. Ensure minimum core obligations to meet the essential levels of the right to education, which includes prohibiting discrimination in access to and in education, ensuring free and compulsory primary education for all, respecting the liberty of parents to choose schools for their children other than those established by public authorities, protecting the liberty of individuals and bodies to establish and direct educational institutions. 2. Take appropriate steps towards the full realization of the right to education to the maximum of its available resources. A lack of resources cannot justify inaction or indefinite postponement of measures to implement the right to education. States must demonstrate they are making every effort to improve the enjoyment of the right to education, even when resources are scarce. 3. Not take retrogressive measures. This means that the state should not take backwards steps or adopt measures that will repeal existing guarantees of the right to education. For instance, introducing school fees in secondary education when it had formerly been free of charge would constitute a retrogressive measure4.

Education is not a privilege. Human Rights Day is observed on December 10 of each year in recognition of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which set outs fundamental human rights, including education, to be universally protected. It was on Friday, December 10, 1948 that the United Nations General Assembly adopted the declaration that proclaimed the inalienable rights which everyone is inherently entitled to as a human being, regardless of race, religion, sex, language, political opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status5. Referencing the above declaration that seems to be one of the most translated documents in the world —available in more than 500 language—, means education is a human right and not a privilege. Education as a human right means: • The right to education is legally guaranteed for all without any discrimination. • States have the obligation to protect, respect, and fulfil the right to education. • There are ways to hold states accountable for violations or deprivations of the right to education.

Education as a human right Today, human rights are inherent to all human beings, regardless of nationality, sex, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, language, or any other status. They cannot be given or taken away. Human rights are the foundation for freedom, justice and peace in the world. They are formally and universally recognized by all countries in the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (1948, UDHR). Since the adoption of the UDHR, many treaties have been adopted by states to reaffirm and guarantee these rights legally. International human rights law sets out the obligations of states to respect, protect, and fulfil human rights for all. These obligations impose specific duties upon states, regardless of their political, economic, and cultural systems. All human rights are universal, indivisible, interdependent, and interrelated (Vienna Declaration and Program of Action, 1993, para. 5). Equality and nondiscrimination are foundational and cross-cutting principles in international human rights law. This means that all human rights apply to everyone.

Education is paramount to the existence of all men. This is why in the wisdom of the crafters of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, they indicated in that sacred document as in article 26, section one to three that: 1. Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit. 2. Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace. 3. Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

This simply supports the fact that Education is considered a fundamental human right because it allows individuals to exercise all their rights especially the right to read, write, comprehend and confront issues of complexity thereby deriving amicable solutions. Being illiterate means not being able to find directions to take a bus, understand the label on a medication bottle, help your child with homework, read programs of political candidates and cast an informed vote etc., but being educated gives the creates the ambiance to positively attend or affect these duties. A basic education is important to ensure that all individuals are aware of their rights. Without an education it is less likely to get a good-paying job and decent housing, participate in the democratic process or value education for future generations. There is evidence that educated citizens care more about the environment, they are more tolerant of others who are not like them, and are more likely to strive for gender equality. In furtherance, education is therefore a fundamental human right because: > It is important in the creation of any democratic society. As Franklin D. Roosevelt puts it that, “Democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely. The real safeguard of democracy, therefore, is education.” People need a good education if they want a good democracy. > It is needed to make a society geopolitically stable. Without a proper educational system available to everyone, terrorists could use free education as a way to radicalize people. In other words, geopolitical stability is one of education’s most powerful effects on society. > It leads to economic prosperity in the global marketplace. This means that, one of the most important effects education has on society is giving the people who live in a society the skills they need to compete in the global marketplace, and the skills they need to produce technological goods that can be sold on the open market. That is why the Athenian Philosopher, Socrates best expressed this idea when he stated that: “Prefer knowledge to wealth, for the one is transitory, the other perpetual.” > It gives people the knowledge they need to elect capable leaders. Plato was never wronged when he stated that, “In politics we presume that everyone who knows how to get votes knows how to administer a city or a state. When we are ill… we do not ask for the handsomest physician, or the most eloquent one.” Education helps the members of society see through the manipulations used by politicians to get votes so that the members of the society can vote for the leader who is best able to run the society. > It helps promote tolerance in a society and helps reduce common conflicts between diverse populations in an urban setting. In the words of Helen Keller “The highest result of education is tolerance.” Educating members of society about other people who either live in the society or its neighboring states have the power to reduce many conflicts.

> It has the propensity to help societies, and the world in general, change for the better. In the wisdom of the greatest African freedom fighter Nelson Mandela, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. Malcolm X says that: “Education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today.” Education is a powerful tool that can be used to make the world a better place to live in. > It helps members in a society learn from the mistakes of the past. That was the reason for which the ancient Greek Philosopher Plato has stated that geopolitical stability cannot be created by forming a democratic government; if the government is established by force or because of overthrowing an old regime, the new government could transform from a government that encourages peace and democracy into a new government that uses force to maintain power. > It reduces violence and crime in societies. Teaching people to read has been shown to prevent people from engaging in crime. In fact, the Melissa Institute for Violence Prevention and Treatment is a charity group that uses education to combat violence and crime. > It creates hope for the future. In reality, providing people the hope that they can improve their lot in life is one of the more powerful effects education has on a society. As postulated by the former United States President, John F. Kennedy when he best expressed the power of a good education system thereby saying, “Let us think of education as the means of developing our greatest abilities, because in each of us there is a private hope and dream which, fulfilled, can be translated into benefit for everyone and greater strength for our nation.” These words of John F. Kennedy about America apply to every society on Earth today. > It closes the gender gap. For many years, women were not allowed to attend school or obtain an education. Because of this, there is a large gender gap, which only creates further problems. Women who gain an education are working toward minimizing the gap to further the abilities of women around the world. An education often prevents young girls from being married off into a potentially limiting, harmful situation. Additionally, women with an education are able to make better, informed decisions for themselves. They often wait longer to have children than those who do not have an education. This ensures that the woman is ready to have children, rather than just being pressured into it by her husband or society. Women with an education have on average three children, while uneducated women have on average seven children to ten children from my country’s (Liberia) perspective6.

Education should be considered a fundamental global priority Both individuals and society benefit from the right to education. It is fundamental for human, social, and economic development and a key element to achieving lasting peace and sustainable development. It is a powerful tool in developing the full potential of everyone and ensuring human dignity, and in promoting individual and collective wellbeing. It is therefore an empowerment right that lifts marginalized groups out of poverty. It is an indispensable means of realizing other rights as it contributes to the full development of the human personality7.

Recommendation: To maintain the continuous flow of education as a fundamental human right, and to further realize and promote the right to education, I am pleased to posit the following recommendations to national and world governing bodies. That: • National and international partners or leaders should persist on raising awareness on the right to education. If individuals know their rights they are empowered to claim them. • Educators world-wide, should advocate and campaign for the full implementation of the right to education, thereby holding the state accountable. • National and global leaders monitor the implementation of the right to education and report regularly on deprivations and violations. • National and global leaders seek remedies or consider serious measures against those who violate the right to education, a fundamental human right. • Women be greatly empowered as their male counterpart in obtaining educational opportunities. • The right to education should be frequently reaffirmed in other treaties covering specific groups (women and girls, persons with disabilities, migrants, refugees, Indigenous Peoples, etc.) and contexts (education during armed conflicts) as it has already been incorporated into various regional treaties and enshrined as a right in the vast majority of national constitutions. • Education becomes meaningfully affordable to all regardless of race, religion, sex, language, political opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. • The Declaration proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on Friday, 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations, be implemented to the fullest by all stakeholders clothed with the authority to disseminate the culture of education throughout the universe and to all men.

BIBLIOGRAPHY. Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in its General Comment 13 on the right to education (1999, para.6) | Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights' General Comment 13 on the right to education (1999, para. 1). | History on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights-Wikipedia. | Human rights obligations: making education available, accessible, acceptable and adaptable (RTE, Katarina Tomaševski, 2001) | Human rights education. | https: www.right-to-education. org. | Index of education articles – Wikipedia index

Working on feeling better

By Dr. Rosa Hilda Lora M. Advisor at AIU | [email protected]


Feel better! Feel happy! These are expressions that are part of our life. Everybody wants to feel that way. We are witnessing a stage of our planet Earth that seems to be far from that “feeling good”. We have a pandemic that doesn’t seem to go away and will be with us for another year. Where is “feeling better”? Where is “feeling happy”? In order to feel happy the first thing is to have life and with it health. If we aren’t healthy we can’t do all the activities we would like. The first gift of existence is health. For health we have to have a balance between: who we are and the environment that surrounds us. We have to achieve a balance of who we are and the nutrients our body needs. We live in a society where what we need to exist physically we have to produce and buy.

Let’s continue with what we are. What we are continues with that producing and acquiring. For that production we have to know how to do something to sell it on the job market. Knowing how to do something implies studying to have an opportunity and acquire the goods we need. You have to pay for services such as: water, electricity, medical insurance or having the resources to pay when you need assistance of that nature. We live in a society we call organized and those activities make life. We also live on a planet that provides us with the resources to live. We think: but what has happened to the lives of human beings and to every being that lives with us? Yes, we say there is a pandemic; yes, we say that vaccines are already being developed but it seems that there is no solution to the situation. It seems that we carry a problem of living satisfied from before. It seems that reaching the goals for a satisfied life are getting further and further away. Everywhere, everyone is protesting. The States have been exceeded in the attention to the population. It is not seen: where or when, peace come back in this world. What is going on? It seems that it is not just the pandemic. We are living in a society where commerce is done at a faster speed every day and more products are also appearing. We know that life has stages and stages: life is in continuous change. We see that change grow; for periods it seems that we stop and then we feel that we are moving forward. There are stages in which it seems that we don’t do anything and there are others in which we put all our effort to achieve new goals. The objectives by periods refer to physical objects and by periods to personal development goals, such as acquiring more skills to ... or acquire knowledge in this or that area. It seems that we are at a stage in human history when there are many goods to buy. What is happening in our world? What is the relationship between that marketing career and feeling good in our lives? As human beings we have a tendency to seek the satisfaction of our needs; we do not remain calm and that they resolve themselves. There is an area of Psychology called Humanist that provides us with an explanation of what the life of human beings is in the search for its fulfillment. We have an American Psychologist, Abraham Maslow (New York 1908 - California 1970) who did good jobs in Humanistic Psychology.

Abraham Maslow PhD Philosophy: Cornell University Master Psychology (1931): University of Wisconsin PhD Psychology (1934): University of Wisconsin He worked with Edward Thorndike and Alfred Adler at Columbia University. According to Maslow the human being has a tendency towards the search for mental health. Maslow explains this process of the search for mental health and the realization of human beings with a model that is a pyramid.

With this model he explains his theory of satisfaction of needs and is called Maslow’s Pyramid of Needs. With an unsatisfied level you can’t reach the next level. We are born with the level of basic needs. The basic needs also have the function of giving rise to the highest. In the Maslow model, he explains that the satisfaction of the low level is what allows us to reach the next level. Physiological: feeding, rest Security: protection Social: affection, belonging Recognition: success, trust Self-actualization: creativity, spontaneity We are in the world of marketing, in the world of a pandemic, in a world in which many are very upset and in a world where States have been overtaken by the pandemic. If we approach Maslow’s theory we can know the following. Human beings seek mental health but now almost all governments bring us in that: Q We have more infected Q These 15 days we will have more severe confinement. Q We are going to get out of the pandemic because we already have vaccines —there are problems with vaccines. Q The economy in a year will be fine —every day there are more unemployed. Q Every day we are further away from satisfying our basic needs. Q When the pandemic wasn’t here, we had the marketing. Q You have to have this product.

Q You have to live in this area. The pyramid of our lives, for a long time, we have not been able to reach the highest level; every day they give us more elements to achieve it. Don’t let governments and marketing build the pyramid of realization of your life. Build your own pyramid so you can get where you want. Forget about the marketing and the governments because those are the levels they want to reach. Build your levels of satisfaction and be happy with them.

BIBLIOGRAPHY. Maslow, A. (2016). El hombre autorrealizado. Hacia una psicología del Ser. España: Kairos | Maslow, A. y otros. (2005). El Management según Maslow. Una visión Humanista para la Empresa de Hoy. España: Paidós

Learning

Summer of play

Let pupils recover from Covid-19 stress.

Experts in child development are calling on the government to support a “summer of play” to help pupils in England recover from the stress of lockdown and a year of Covid upheaval. Instead of extra lessons, catch-up summer schools and longer school days, they said children should be encouraged to spend the coming months outdoors, being physically active and having fun with their friends. Psychologists have reported behavioural changes in some children following the first lockdown last year. After months of isolation from friends, some struggled to share and play together, teachers reported more fights and fallings-out, and Ofsted observed a worrying drop in physical fitness. As the government draws up its latest education catch-up plans, to be unveiled in the coming weeks, a group of academics calling themselves Play- FirstUK have written to the education secretary, Gavin Williamson, appealing for a new emphasis on play, mental health and wellbeing as children emerge from lockdown. “This spring and summer should not be filled with extra lessons,” the letter says. “Children, teachers and parents need time and space to recover from the stress that the past year has placed on them. ... It continues: “Social connection and play offer myriad learning opportunities ... Read full text:

Sia’s new film

How autistic people actually feel about it.

When the trailer for Sia’s ... movie “Music” was released in November, she faced intense backlash from people in the autistic community. ... The Autisticats, a group of autistic people ... explained: “This performance is a caricature of autistic body language. It’s unsettling, and insincere. And it is deeply reminiscent of the exaggerated mannerisms non-autistic people often employ when bullying autistic & developmentally disabled people for the ways we move. ... Full text: https://www. upworthy.com/autistic-reviewers-respond-to-sia-film In one scene, Zu [Kate Hudson] is taught how to hold down Music through prone restraint (face-down to the ground) when she has a meltdown in the park. ... prone restraint has led to a number of deaths in children at youth homes and schools in real-life, and is a frowned upon practice in the community. ... Full text: https://junkee.com/ sia-music-autistic-response/287963 What really got me was how Music was used as a prop to advance everyone’s lives but her own. I really don’t know why the movie is named after her because so little screen time is given to her character’s development. Full text by Niko Boskovic: https://www.ocdd.org/ february-2021-blog-post/ To learn more about autism from actually autistic people, visit The music media kit from NeuroClastic people: https://neuroclastic.com/music/ Read full text:


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Photophoresis

Researchers levitated a small tray using nothing but light.

In the basement of a University of Pennsylvania engineering building, Mohsen Azadi and his labmates huddled around a set of blinding LEDs set beneath an acrylic vacuum chamber. They stared at the lights, their cameras, and what they hoped would soon be some action from the two tiny plastic plates sitting inside the enclosure. “We didn’t know what we were expecting to see,” says Azadi, a mechanical engineering PhD candidate. “But we hoped to see something.” Let’s put it this way: They wanted to see if those plates would levitate, lofted solely by the power of light. Lightinduced flow, or photophoresis, isn’t a breakthrough on its own. Researchers have used this physical phenomenon to float invisible aerosols and sort particles in microfluidic devices. But they have never before moved an object big enough to grasp —much less lifted anything that can carry objects itself. And it worked. “When the two samples lifted,” Azadi says, “there was this gasp between all of us.” The Mylar plates, each as wide as a pencil’s diameter, hovered thanks to nothing but the energy from the light below, according to a paper published today in Science Advances. Energy from the LEDs heats up the Mylar’s specially-coated underbelly, energizing air particles under the plastic and propelling the plates away with a tiny, but ...
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A hitchhiker’s guide

...to an ancient geomagnetic disruption.

A shift in Earth’s poles 42,000 years ago may have drastically altered the planet’s climate, scientists have found —and they’re naming the period [Adams Event] after the author Douglas Adams. Earth’s magnetic field collapsed. Ice sheets surged across North America, Australasia and the Andes. Wind belts shifted across the Pacific and Southern Oceans. Prolonged drought hit Australia; that continent’s biggest mammals went extinct. Humans took to caves to make ochre-color art. Neanderthals died off for good. Through it all, one giant kauri tree stood tall —until, after nearly two millenniums, it died and fell in a swamp, where the chemical records embedded in its flesh were immaculately preserved. That tree, unearthed a few years ago near Ngawha Springs in northern New Zealand, finally allowed researchers to fit a tight timeline to what before had seemed like an intriguing but only vaguely correlated series of events. What if, the researchers posited, the crash of the magnetic field spawned the climatic changes of that era? And to think that the Ngawha kauri tree had borne witness to the whole thing. “It must have seemed like the end of days,” said Chris S.M. Turney, a geoscientist ... part of a large team that described the findings in a study published in Science. “And this tree ...
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MIS-C

Covid-linked syndrome in children is growing.

The condition, which usually emerges several weeks after infection, is still rare, but can be dangerous. “A higher percentage of them are really critically ill,” one doctor said. Doctors across the country have been seeing a striking increase in the number of young people with the condition... which is called Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children or MIS-C. Even more worrisome, they say, is that more patients are now very sick than during the first wave of cases, which alarmed doctors and parents around the world last spring. “We’re now getting more of these MIS-C kids, but this time, it just seems that a higher percentage of them are really critically ill,” said Dr. Roberta DeBiasi, chief of infectious diseases at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C. During the hospital’s first wave, about half the patients needed treatment in the intensive care unit, she said, but now 80 to 90 percent do. ... So far, there’s no evidence that recent coronavirus variants are responsible, and experts say it is too early to speculate about any impact of variants on the syndrome. The condition remains rare. The latest numbers from the CDCP show 2,060 cases in 48 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, including 30 deaths. The median age was 9, but infants to 20-year-olds have been ... Read full text: Read full text:

Disabled people

Account for six in 10 deaths by Covid-19 in England last year.

Some 30,296 of the 50,888 deaths between January and November 2020 were people with a disability, Office for National Statistics (ONS) data shows. It also suggests the risk of death is three times greater for more severely disabled people. Charities have called for urgent government action, describing the data as “horrifying and tragic”. The ONS figures suggest disabled people were disproportionately affected by the pandemic —accounting for 17.2% of the study population but nearly 60% of coronavirus deaths. Among women, the risk of death involving coronavirus was 3.5 times greater for more-disabled women - defined as having their day-to-day activities “limited a lot” by their health — compared with non-disabled women. For less-disabled women, defined as having their day-to-day activities “limited a little”, the risk was two times greater. Compared to nondisabled men, the data showed that the risk was 3.1 times greater for moredisabled men, and 1.9 times greater for less-disabled men. Looking at people with a medically diagnosed learning disability, the risk of death involving Covid was 3.7 times greater for both men and women compared with people who did not have a learning disability. The ONS said an “important part” of the increased risk was because disabled people ...
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Adaptive fashion

Seven brands to follow.

When some people hear the words “adaptive clothing,” their minds may instantly jump to images of sweatsuits and velcro closures. But, in actuality, adaptive clothing— a term used to describe clothing for people with disabilities and medical conditions that make getting dressed challenging—is super chic and stylish thanks to a handful of designers who are raising the bar. Because why should using a wheelchair or medical device mean you have to sacrifice style? The following are seven designers and their adaptive brands: Izzy Camilleri, IZ Adaptive • Marta Elena, Abilitee • Sophie Ternest and Debbie Provoost, So Yes • Marie Pier Fortin, Mode Ézé Plus • Tommy Hilfiger, Tommy Adaptive • Heidi McKenzie, Alter Ur Ego • Tobie Hatfield, Nike ...
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Iris Van Herpen

Creates haute couture dress from ocean plastic.



Fashion designer Iris van Herpen has unveiled a haute couture dress constructed from ocean plastic fabric produced by Parley for the Oceans, which was cut into trilateral pieces to form a tessellated, translucent garment. The dress forms part of Van Herpen’s Roots of Rebirth Spring/ Summer 2021 collection, which referenced “the intricacy of funghi” and the interconnectedness of mushrooms and especially mycelium, the tubular filaments that funghi use to grow. Van Herpen used a variety of different materials when designing the collection, which consisted entirely of dresses. For the sixth look on the catwalk, the Holobiont dress, Van Herpen used Parley for the Oceans’ trademarked Ocean Plastic fabric. The material is made from upcycled marine waste, sourced from the estimated eight million tons of plastic waste that end up in our oceans every year. Parley for the Oceans collects plastic debris from shores and oceans, which is shredded and reworked into yarn. Implementing these kinds of sustainable and recyclable materials into the collections is an ongoing development in her atelier, Van Herpen told Dezeen. “We do a lot of material development in-house and we also collaborate with companies and institutes globally, like Parley for the Oceans,” she said. ...
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TIGER X-1

Unlike most four-wheel drives



, TIGER X-1 [TIGER being short for Transforming Intelligent Ground Excursion Robot] has motorized and bendable limbs to cross over obstacles in geographic terrains hard to reach by wheels. Each wheel is attached with a leg that, upon being confronted with a difficult area, straightens up or bends and steps over the obstacle. Sensors are installed to detect possible complications or uneven ground. No driver is needed, as the miniaturized TIGER X-1 is fully autonomous. The car thus has the advantage of being able to carry cargo to “extreme, remote” terrain. Depending on the type of location, it can either serve as a four-wheeled vehicle or “a four-legged walking machine,” Hyundai describes in a press release, and its ability to travel in all directions —whether via wheels or legs— means it can really go places. ...
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Microbial ecosystems

...in the mouth and gut are linked to many ills.

“I think it’s unlikely that any condition in the body is one where the microbiome isn’t involved.” That is the considered opinion of Iain Chapple ... who was, until 2020, head of dentistry at Birmingham University, in Britain, and is still an active researcher in the field. ... Even a healthy mouth is inhabited by lots of bugs. Meanwhile, at the other end of the alimentary canal, the large intestine contains so many microbes that they probably outnumber the cells of the human body. Both bacterial populations have coevolved with their hosts for millions of years, so Dr Chapple is almost certainly right about the intimate connection between them and the body. ... Dr Chapple has been seeking a link between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In periodontitis, to give gum disease its proper name, the number of bacteria in the crevice between a tooth and its surroundings rises from thousands to millions. The gums being well supplied with blood vessels, such bacteria can hitch a ride to the rest of the body. This fact has been linked ... also with diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and, according to Purnima Kumar of Ohio State University, who helped to organise the session in question, over 50 other conditions. ...
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Less biased judgments

Research indicates that ambivalent people make more of them.

People who tend to experience mixed feelings are less likely to fall prey to two common cognitive biases, according to new research published in the British Journal of Social Psychology. The findings indicate that being able to simultaneously see both the positive and negative sides of things has some psychological benefits. “I think we live in a time where there is a lot of emphasis on ‘strong’ opinions and people who are very ‘certain’ about their stances, leading to division and polarization,” said author Iris K. Schneider, a professor of social and economic cognition at the University of Cologne. “There seems to be very little room for the fact that many important issues are actually multi-faceted, with both positive and negative sides to them. Indeed, there is a little bit of bias against being ambivalent because it is seen as indecisive and uncertain. I believe that this is not justified and that there are benefits to being ambivalent because it provides a broader, more realistic view of the world.” In four studies, Schneider and her colleagues examined the relationship between ambivalence and two cognitive biases. Two studies examined correspondence bias, also known as the fundamental attribution error, which describes the tendency to over-emphasize personality-based rather than situational ...
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Bitcoin mining

Now uses more electricity than Argentina.

Bitcoin is a digital cryptocurrency craze that has taken over the internet, requiring no physical form or bank to be used, created through a process called mining. Mining is essentially using powerful computer components –particularly graphics cards– to verify bitcoin transactions, a process that then creates bitcoins for the user. Due to a recent surge in the price of Bitcoin, miners from around the world are hooking up power-hungry computing rigs to create the encrypted currency, which has a limited supply before no more can be created. The Cambridge Bitcoin Electricity Consumption Index was set up to track the energy draw of this process globally. It is a “best-guess estimate”, which is then taken and compared to other electricity uses to demonstrate the huge impact of cryptocurrency. The most recent update suggests ... Bitcoin now consumes 121.36 terawatthours worth of electricity every single year, a number that is higher than Argentina’s energy consumption and hot on the heels of Norway. When Bitcoin is classed as a country, it ranks 30th in the world, consuming almost 0.5% of the world’s energy production. Currently sitting at $47,700, Bitcoin continues to rise in price. As supply dwindles, big names ... are investing, with Tesla purchasing $1.5 billion of Bitcoin despite critics slamming the company for the environmental impact of the transaction. ... Read full text:
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Norway + UK + Canada

They are not climate champions. They are climate hypocrites.

In Oslo, the street lamps are powered by renewables. To conserve energy, the smart lights dim when nobody is around. The Norwegian capital, like the rest of the country, is proud of its exceptional green credentials. Its public transportation system too is powered entirely by renewable energy. Two thirds of new cars sold in the city are electric. There’s even a highway for bees. There’s just one problem. Much of the environmental innovation that Norway is so proud of is financed by its oil money. Because Norway, apart from being a forward-thinking climate champion, is also a major fossil fuels exporter. And it plans to keep it that way for a long time to come. Norway isn’t the only country preaching sustainability while simultaneously cashing in on the very thing that is causing climate change. The UK is hosting a major climate summit later this year. At the same time, it is contemplating opening a new coal mine. Canada, a self-proclaimed climate leader, is pouring tax dollars into a doomed oil pipeline project. Many countries produce fossil fuels despite committing to combat climate change. But Canada, Norway ... Read full text

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Disha Ravi

Indian climate activist becomes symbol of crackdown on dissent.

A 22-year-old climate activist has emerged as a symbol of the Indian government’s crackdown on dissent as the country confronts a growing crisis after months of protests from furious farmers. Disha Ravi was arrested last weekend and charged with sedition, with a Delhi court on Friday granting a police request to extend her detention for three more days. Her lawyers say she was arrested illegally. Ravi’s arrest prompted protests throughout the country and renewed concerns of an authoritarian backlash to the farmers’ protests that have rocked the country. She is accused of helping to create and share an online “toolkit” that listed peaceful ways the public could support the protests. The document was later shared online by the Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg as she joined a litany of global celebrities leading support for the movement. Since November, tens of thousands of farmers have been camping out in the capital to protest new agricultural laws that they say could destroy their livelihoods and leave them open to exploitation by large corporations. Ravi fervently backed the cause, tweeting her support for the farmers as they pose a rare and major challenge to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s authority. Farmers are the most influential voting ... Read full text:

Sharks and rays

Extinction seems imminent for them.

Marine scientists knew sharks were in trouble, but the results of a new Nature study show just how grim things really are. The devastating documents show a 71% decline of oceanic shark and ray populations over the past 50 years –and it’s primarily due to overfishing. The study confirms fears that high levels of decline in pelagic sharks and rays are happening on a worldwide scale. For all 31 oceanic shark and ray species assessed in the study, the risk of extinction has increased substantially since 1980 and now 75% of them qualify as threatened with extinction under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species ™ criteria. Even more alarmingly, half (16 of 31) of the oceanic shark and ray species assessed are considered Critically Endangered. “Oceanic sharks and rays often suffer most severely from anthropogenic threats. Their preferred pelagic habitat is out of sight and out of mind,” says contributing author Dr. Andrea Marshall from the Marine Megafauna Foundation’s (MMF) “Unregulated or unsustainable fishing pressure is difficult to control in international waters, so it is no surprise that their populations are crashing globally. To reverse these trends we will need to figure out how to create ... Read full text and watch video:

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Campus

Escape the confines of time and space

The intrigue revolves around a classified 1983 CIA report on a technique called the Gateway Experience, which is a training system designed to focus brainwave output to alter consciousness and ultimately escape the restrictions of time and space. The CIA was interested in all sorts of psychic research at the time, ... The documents have since been declassified and are available to view. This is a comprehensive excavation of The Gateway Process report. ...

Personnel The author of The Gateway Process report is Lieutenant Colonel Wayne M. McDonnell, hereon referred to as Wayne. ... A scientific approach From the outset of the report, Wayne states his intent to employ an objective scientific method in order to understand the Gateway process. The various scientific avenues he takes include: • A biomedical inquiry to understand the physical aspects of the process. • Information on quantum mechanics to describe the nature and functioning of human consciousness. • Theoretical physics to explain the time-space dimension and means by which expanded human consciousness transcends it. • Classical physics to bring the whole phenomenon of out-of-body states into the language of physical science (and remove the stigma of an occult connotation).

Methodological frames of reference Before diving into the Gateway Experience, Wayne develops a frame of reference by dissecting three discrete consciousness-altering methodologies. He’s basically saying, there’s no way you’re going to get through The Gateway without a solid grounding in the brain-altering techniques that came before it. 1) Hypnosis ... 2) Transcendental meditation ... 3) Biofeedback ...

The Gateway mechanics With that, Wayne takes a first stab at the Gateway process. He classifies it as a “training system designed to bring enhanced strength, focus and coherence to the amplitude and frequency of brainwave output between the left and right hemispheres so as to alter consciousness.” What distinguishes the Gateway process from hypnosis, TM, and biofeedback, is that it requires achieving a state of consciousness in which the electrical brain patterns of both hemispheres are equal in amplitude and frequency. This is called Hemi-Sync. Lamentably, and perhaps conveniently, we cannot as humans achieve this state on our own. The audio techniques developed by Bob Monroe and his Institute (which comprise a series of tapes), claim to induce and sustain Hemi-Sync. Here, the document shifts to the usage of quotes and other reports to describe the powers of Hemi-Sync. Wayne employs the analogy of a lamp versus a laser. Left to its own devices the human mind expends energy like a lamp, in a chaotic and incoherent way, achieving lots of diffusion but relatively little depth.

Under Hemi-Sync though, the mind produces a “disciplined stream of light.” So, once the frequency and amplitude of the brain are rendered coherent it can then synchronize with the rarified energy levels of the universe. With this connection intact, the brain begins to receive symbols and display astonishing flashes of holistic intuition. The Hemi-Sync technique takes advantage of a Frequency Following Response (FFR). It works like this: an external frequency emulating a recognized one will cause the brain to mimic it. So if a subject hears a frequency at the Theta level, it will shift from its resting Beta level. To achieve these unnatural levels, Hemi-Sync puts a single frequency in the left ear and a contrasting frequency in the right. The brain then experiences the Delta frequency, also known as the beat frequency. It’s more familiarly referred to these days as binaural music. With the FFR and beat frequency phenomena firmly in place, The Gateway Process introduces a series of frequencies at marginally audible, subliminal levels. With the left brain relaxed and the body in a virtual sleep state, the conditions are ideal to promote brainwave outputs of higher and higher amplitude and frequency. Alongside subliminal suggestions from Bob Monroe (naturally), the subject can then alter their consciousness. The Gateway system only works when the audio, which is introduced through headphones, is accompanied by a physical quietude comparable to other forms of meditation. This increases the subject’s internal resonance to the body’s sound frequencies, for example the heart. This eliminates the “bifurcation echo”, in which the heartbeat moves up and down the body seven times a second. By placing the body in a sleep-like state, The Gateway Tapes, like meditation, lessen the force and frequency of the heartbeat pushing blood into the aorta. The result is a rhythmic sine wave that in turn amplifies the sound volume of the heart three times. This then amplifies the frequency of brainwave output. The film surrounding the brain —the dura— and fluid between that film and the skull, eventually begin to move up and down, by .0005 and .010 mm. The body, based on its own micro-motions, then functions as a tuned vibrational system. The report claims that the entire body eventually transfers energy at between 6.8 and 7.5 Hz, which matches Earth’s own energy (7 - 7.5 Hz). The resulting wavelengths are long, about 40,000 km, which also happens to be the perimeter of the planet. According to Bentov, the signal can move around the world’s electrostatic field in 1/7th of a second. ...

A psycho-quantum level deeper Wayne then turns to the very nature of matter and energy. More materially (or less if you will), solid matter in the strict construction of the term, he explains, doesn’t exist. The atomic structure is composed of oscillating energy grids surrounded by other oscillating energy grids at tremendous speeds. These oscillation rates vary —the nucleus of an atom vibrates at 10 to the power of 22, a molecule vibrates at 10 to the power of 9, a human cell vibrates at 10 to the power of 3. The point is that the entire universe is one complex system of energy fields. States of matter in this conception then are merely variations in the state of energy. The result of all these moving energies, bouncing off of energy at rest, projects a 3D mode, a pattern, called a hologram, A.K.A our reality as we experience it. It’s best to think of it as a 3D photograph. There’s a whole rabbit hole to go down here. Suffice it to say, the hologram that is our experience is incredibly good at depicting and recording all the various energies bouncing around creating matter. So good, in fact, that we buy into it hook, line, and sinker, going so far as to call it our “life.” Consciousness then can be envisaged as a 3D grid system superimposed over all energy patterns, Wayne writes. Using mathematics, each plane of the grid system can then reduce the data to a 2D form. Our binary (go/no go) minds can then process the data and compare it to other historical data saved in our memory. Our reality is then formed by comparisons. The right hemisphere of the brain acts as the primary matrix or receptor for this holographic input. The left hemisphere then compares it to other data, reducing it to its 2D form. In keeping with our species’ commitment to exceptionalism, as far as we know humans are uniquely capable of achieving this level of consciousness. Simply, humans not only know, but we know that we know. This bestows upon us the ability to duplicate aspects of our own hologram, project them out, perceive that projection, run it through a comparison with our own memory of the hologram, measure the differences using 3D geometry, then run it through our binary system to yield verbal cognition of the self.

The click-out phase Wayne then shows his cards as a true punisher, issuing, “Up to this point our discussion of the Gateway process has been relatively simple and easy to follow. Now the fun begins.” Shots fired, Wayne. What he’s preparing the commander reading this heady report for is the reveal —how we can use the Gateway to transcend the dimension of spacetime. Time is a measurement of energy or force in motion; it is a measurement of change. This is really important. For energy to be classified as in motion, it must be confined within a vibratory pattern that can contain its motion, keeping it still. Energy not ...
Read full text by Zaria Gorvett:

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Pleats please knapsack.

Issey Miyake’s signature design bags printed with the MoMA logo rendered in a bold graphic derived from Katakana. The cords allow you to adjust the height of the bag. store.moma.org

Toilet paper holder with shelf.

A minimalist design for your bathroom, this metal holder includes a thoughtfully incorporated shelf that’s perfect for a small plant or a scented candle. store.moma.org

Vestaboard.

Inspire others, display lists, menus, quotes, patterns and more with the Vestaboard, a split-flap smart messaging display that uses 132 bits. Each bit has 64 matte-printed characters including the alphabet, numbers, punctuation and colors. store.moma.org

Lierre Keith. (1964—)

“There is no place left for the buffalo to roam. There’s only corn, wheat, and soy. About the only animals that escaped the biotic cleansing of the agriculturalists are small animals like mice and rabbits, and billions of them are killed by the harvesting equipment every year. Unless you’re out there with a scythe, don’t forget to add them to the death toll of your vegetarian meal. They count, and they died for your dinner, along with all the animals that have dwindled past the point of genetic feasibility.”

Lierre Keith. (1964—) American writer, feminist, food activist, and radical environmentalist.

Good Advice

9. DON'T TRY TO IMPRESS EVERYONE.
The unhappiest people are those who care the most about what other people think. Source: www.inc.com


Bachelor's of Music

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL AND HUMAN STUDIES

The Bachelor of Music (BA) program help students develop an aptitude and self confidence while building the real-life skills needed to succeed as a professional musician by providing a strong foundation in music fundamentals, including harmony, sight reading, and repertoire. The Bachelor of Music (BA) program is offered online via distance learning. After evaluating both academic record and life experience, AIU staff working in conjunction with Faculty and Academic Advisors will assist students in setting up a custom-made program, designed on an individual basis. This flexibility to meet student needs is seldom found in other distance learning programs. Our online program does not require all students to take the same subjects/courses, use the same books, or learning materials. Instead, the online Bachelor of Music (BA) curriculum is designed individually by the student and academic advisor. It specifically addresses strengths and weaknesses with respect to market opportunities in the student’s major and intended field of work. Understanding that industry and geographic factors should influence the content of the curriculum instead of a standardized one-fits-all design is the hallmark of AIU’s unique approach to adult education. This philosophy addresses the dynamic and constantly changing environment of working professionals by helping adult students in reaching their professional and personal goals within the scope of the degree program.

Important:

Below is an example of the topics or areas you may develop and work on during your studies. By no means is it a complete or required list as AIU programs do not follow a standardized curriculum. It is meant solely as a reference point and example. Want to learn more about the curriculum design at AIU? Go ahead and visit our website, especially the Course and Curriculum section: http://aiu.edu/CourseCurriculum.html

Orientation Courses:

Communication & Investigation (Comprehensive Resume)
Organization Theory (Portfolio)
Experiential Learning (Autobiography)
Seminar Administrative Development (Book Summary)
Seminar Cultural Development (Practical Experience)
Seminar International Development (Publications)

Core Courses and Topics

Ensembles
Various reading
Various instrument study
Performance
Theory
Marketing & promotion in the music industry
Ear training
Styles survey
Music history
Contemporary arranging
Studio recording
Topics in contemporary music
Keyboard proficiency
Diction
Music contracts
Business writing for the music industry
Music publishing
Personal management in the music industry
Networking in the music business
Independent artist marketing

Research Project

Bachelor Thesis Project
MBM300 Thesis Proposal
MBM302 Bachelor Thesis (5,000 words)

Contact us to get started

Each graduate is encouraged to publish their research papers either online in the public domain or through professional journals and periodicals worldwide

aiu.edu/apply-online.html

Pioneer Plaza/900 Fort Street Mall 410
Honolulu, HI 96813
800-993-0066 (Toll Free in US)
808-924-9567 (Internationally)

Publication.

Each Bachelor graduate is encouraged to publish their research papers either online in the public domain or through professional journals and periodicals worldwide.


About Us

Accreditation

Atlantic International University offers distance learning degree programs for adult learners at bachelors, masters, and doctoral level. With self paced program taken online, AIU lifts the obstacles that keep professional adults from completing their educational goals. Programs are available throughout a wide range of majors and areas of study. All of this with a philosophically holistic approach towards education fitting within the balance of your life and acknowledging the key role each individual can play in their community, country, and the world. Atlantic International University is accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Schools, Colleges and Universities (ASIC). ASIC Accreditation is an internationally renowned quality standard for colleges and universities. Visit ASIC’s Directory of Accredited Colleges and Universities. ASIC is a member of CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG) in the USA, an approved accreditation body by the Ministerial Department of the Home Office in the UK, and is listed in the International Directory of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). The University is based in the United States and was established by corporate charter in 1998.

Our founding principles are based on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights; per article 26, AIU believes that Higher Education is a Human Right. The University has implemented a paradigm shifting educational model for its academic programs that have allowed it to move closer to this goal through the self-empowerment of its students, decentralization of the learning process, personalized open curriculum design, a sustainable learning model, developing 11 core elements of the Human Condition within MYAIU, and utilizing the quasi-infinite knowledge through the use of information technology combined with our own capacity to find solutions to all types of global issues, dynamic problems, and those of individuals and multidisciplinary teams. Due to these differentiations and the university’s mission, only a reputable accrediting agency with the vision and plasticity to integrate and adapt its processes around AIU’s proven and successful innovative programs could be selected. Unfortunately, the vast majority of accrediting agencies adhere to and follow obsolete processes and requirements that have outlived their usefulness and are in direct conflict with the university’s mission of offering a unique, dynamic, affordable, quality higher education to the nontraditional student (one who must work, study what he really needs for professional advancement, attend family issues, etc.). We believe that adopting outdated requirements and processes would impose increased financial burdens on students while severely limiting their opportunities to earn their degree and advance in all aspects. Thus, in selecting the ASIC as its accrediting agency, AIU ensured that its unique programs would not be transformed into a copy or clone of those offered by the 10,000+ colleges and universities around the world. Since ASIC is an international accrediting agency based outside the United States, we are required by statute HRS446E to place the following disclaimer: ATLANTIC INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY IS NOT ACCREDITED BY AN ACCREDITING AGENCY RECOGNIZED BY THE UNITED STATES SECRETARY OF EDUCATION. Note: In the United States and abroad, many licensing authorities require accredited degrees as the basis for eligibility for licensing.

In some cases, accredited colleges may not accept for transfer courses and degrees completed at unaccredited colleges, and some employers may require an accredited degree as a basis for eligibility for employment. Potential students should consider how the above may affect their interests, AIU respects the unique rules and regulations of each country and does not seek to influence the respective authorities. In the event that a prospective student wishes to carry out any government review or process in regards to his university degree, we recommend that the requirements of such are explored in detail with the relevant authorities by the prospective student as the university does not intervene in such processes. AIU students can be found in over 180 countries, they actively participate and volunteer in their communities as part of their academic program and have allocated thousands of service hours to diverse causes and initiatives. AIU programs follow the standards commonly used by colleges and universities in the United States with regards to the following: academic program structure, degree issued, transcript, and other graduation documents. AIU graduation documents can include an apostille and authentication from the US Department of State to facilitate their use internationally.

The AIU Difference

It is acknowledged that the act of learning is endogenous, (from within), rather than exogenous.

This fact is the underlying rationale for “Distance Learning”, in all of the programs offered by AIU. The combination of the underlying principles of student “self instruction”, (with guidance), collaborative development of curriculum unique to each student, and flexibility of time and place of study, provides the ideal learning environment to satisfy individual needs.

AIU is an institution of experiential learning and nontraditional education at a distance. There are no classrooms and attendance is not required.

Mission & Vision

MISSION:

To be a higher learning institution concerned about generating cultural development alternatives likely to be sustained in order to lead to a more efficient administration of the world village and its environment; exerting human and community rights through diversity with the ultimate goal of the satisfaction and evolution of the world.

VISION:

The empowerment of the individual towards the convergence of the world through a sustainable educational design based on andragogy and omniology.

Organizational Structure

Dr. Franklin Valcin
President/Academic Dean
Dr. José Mercado
Chief Executive Officer
Chairman of the Board of Trustees
Ricardo González, PhD
Provost
     
Dr. Ricardo Gonzalez
Chief Operation Officer
and MKT Director
Linda Collazo
Logistics Coordinator
Dr. Silvia Restorff
Academic Advisor
     
Dr. Miriam Garibaldi
Viceprovost for Research
Irina Ivashuk
Alumni Association
Coordinator
Dr. Prakash Menon
Academic Advisor
     
Dr. Ofelia Miller
Director of AIU
Clara Margalef
Director of Special Projects
of AIU
Carlos Aponte
Telecommunications
Coordinator
     
Juan Pablo Moreno
Director of Operations
David Jung
Corporate/Legal Counsel
Dr. Nilani Ljunggren De Silva
Academic Advisor
     
Paula Viera
Director of
Intelligence Systems
Bruce Kim
Advisor/Consultant
Dr. Scott Wilson
Academic Advisor
     
Felipe Gomez
Design Director / IT Supervisor
Thomas Kim
Corporate/
Accounting Counsel
Dr. Mohammad Shaidul Islam
Academic Advisor
     
Daritza Ysla
IT Coordinator
Camila Correa
Quality Assurance Coordinator
Dr. Edgar Colon
Academic Advisor
     
Nadeem Awan
Chief Programming Officer
Maricela Esparza
Administrative Coordinator
Deborah Rodriguez
Academic Tutor Coordinator
     
Dr. Jack Rosenzweig
Dean of Academic Affairs
Chris Benjamin
IT and Hosting Support
Cyndy Dominguez
Academic Tutor Coordinator
     
Dr. Edward Lambert
Academic Director
Mayra Bolivar
Accounting Coordinator
Kinmberly Diaz
Admissions Support Tutor
     
Dr. Ariadna Romero
Advisor Coordinator
Roberto Aldrett
Communications Coordinator
Amalia Aldrett
Admissions Coordinator
     
Nadia Gabaldon
Academic Coordinator
Giovanni Castillo
IT Support
Sandra Garcia
Admissions Coordinator
     
Jhanzaib Awan
Senior Programmer
Jaime Rotlewicz
Dean of Admissions
Jose Neuhaus
Admissions Support
     
Leonardo Salas
Human Resource Manager
Dr. Mario Rios
Academic Advisor
Junko Shimizu
Admissions Coordinator
     
Benjamin Joseph
IT and Technology Support
Michael Phillips
Registrar’s Office
Veronica Amuz
Admissions Coordinator
     
Rosie Perez
Finance Coordinator
Rene Cordon
Admissions Support
Alba Ochoa
Admissions Coordinator
     
Chris Soto
Admissions Counselor
Jenis Garcia
Admissions Counselor
 
     

FACULTY AND STAFF PAGE: www.aiu.edu/FacultyStaff.html


School of Business and Economics

The School of Business and Economics allows aspiring and practicing professionals, managers, and entrepreneurs in the private and public sectors to complete a self paced distance learning degree program of the highest academic standard. The ultimate goal is to empower learners and help them take advantage of the enormous array of resources from the world environment in order to eliminate the current continuum of poverty and limitations. Degree programs are designed for those students whose professional experience has been in business, marketing, administration, economics, finance and management.

Areas of Study:

Accounting, Advertising, Banking, Business Administration, Communications, Ecommerce, Finance, Foreign Affairs, Home Economics, Human Resources, International Business, International Finance, Investing, Globalization, Marketing, Management, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Public Administrations, Sustainable Development, Public Relations, Telecommunications, Tourism, Trade.

School of Social and Human Studies

The School of Social and Human Studies is focused on to the development of studies which instill a core commitment to building a society based on social and economic justice and enhancing opportunities for human well being. The founding principles lie on the basic right of education as outlined in the Declaration of Human Rights. We instill in our students a sense of confidence and self reliance in their ability to access the vast opportunities available through information channels, the world wide web, private, public, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organizations in an ever expanding global community. Degree programs are aimed towards those whose professional life has been related to social and human behavior, with the arts, or with cultural studies.

Areas of Study:

Psychology, International Affairs, Sociology, Political Sciences, Architecture, Legal Studies, Public Administration, Literature and languages, Art History, Ministry, African Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Asian Studies, European Studies, Islamic Studies, Religious Studies.

School of Science and Engineering

The School of Science and Engineering seeks to provide dynamic, integrated, and challenging degree programs designed for those whose experience is in industrial research, scientific production, engineering and the general sciences. Our system for research and education will keep us apace with the twenty-first century reach scientific advance in an environmentally and ecologically responsible manner to allow for the sustainability of the human population. We will foster among our students a demand for ethical behavior, an appreciation for diversity, an understanding of scientific investigation, knowledge of design innovation, a critical appreciation for the importance of technology and technological change for the advancement of humanity.

Areas of Study:

Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics, Communications, Petroleum Science, Information Technology, Telecommunications, Nutrition Science, Agricultural Science, Computer Science, Sports Science, Renewable Energy, Geology, Urban Planning.

Online Library Resources

With access to a global catalog created and maintained collectively by more than 9,000 participating institutions, AIU students have secured excellent research tools for their study programs.

The AIU online library contains over 2 billion records and over 300 million bibliographic records that are increasing day by day. The sources spanning thousands of years and virtually all forms of human expression. There are files of all kinds, from antique inscribed stones to e-books, form wax engravings to MP3s, DVDs and websites. In addition to the archives, the library AIU Online offers electronic access to more than 149,000 e-books, dozens of databases and more than 13 million full-text articles with pictures included. Being able to access 60 databases and 2393 periodicals with more than 18 million items, guarantees the information required to perform the assigned research project. Users will find that many files are enriched with artistic creations on the covers, indexes, reviews, summaries and other information.

The records usually have information attached from important libraries. The user can quickly assess the relevance of the information and decide if it is the right source.

Education on the 21st century

AIU is striving to regain the significance of the concept of education, which is rooted into the Latin “educare”, meaning “to pull out”, breaking loose from the paradigm of most 21st century universities with their focus on “digging and placing information” into students’ heads rather than teaching them to think. For AIU, the generation of “clones” that some traditional universities are spreading throughout the real world is one of the most salient reasons for today’s ills. In fact, students trained at those educational institutions never feel a desire to “change the world” or the current status quo; instead, they adjust to the environment, believe everything is fine, and are proud of it all.

IN A WORLD where knowledge and mostly information expire just like milk, we must reinvent university as a whole in which each student, as the key player, is UNIQUE within an intertwined environment. This century’s university must generate new knowledge bits although this may entail its separation from both the administrative bureaucracy and the faculty that evolve there as well. AIU thinks that a university should be increasingly integrated into the “real world”, society, the economy, and the holistic human being. As such, it should concentrate on its ultimate goal, which is the student, and get him/her deeply immersed into a daily praxis of paradigm shifts, along with the Internet and research, all these being presently accessible only to a small minority of the world community. AIU students must accomplish their self-learning mission while conceptualizing it as the core of daily life values through the type of experiences that lead to a human being’s progress when information is converted into education. The entire AIU family must think of the university as a setting that values diversity and talent in a way that trains mankind not only for the present but above all for a future that calls everyday for professionals who empower themselves in academic and professional areas highly in demand in our modern society. We shall not forget that, at AIU, students are responsible for discovering their own talents and potential, which they must auto-develop in such a way that the whole finish product opens up as a flower that blossoms every year more openly.

THE AIU STANCE is against the idea of the campus as a getaway from day-to-day pressure since we believe reality is the best potential-enhancer ever; one truly learns through thinking, brainstorming ideas, which leads to new solutions, and ultimately the rebirth of a human being fully integrated in a sustainable world environment. Self-learning is actualized more from within than a top-down vantage point, that is to say, to influence instead of requesting, ideas more than power. We need to create a society where solidarity, culture, life, not political or economic rationalism and more than techno structures, are prioritized. In short, the characteristics of AIU students and alumni remain independence, creativity, self-confidence, and ability to take risk towards new endeavors. This is about people’s worth based not on what they know but on what they do with what they know.

Read more at: www.aiu.edu

AIU Service

AIU offers educational opportunities in the USA to adults from around the world so that they can use their own potential to manage their personal, global cultural development. The foundational axis of our philosophy lies upon self-actualized knowledge and information, with no room for obsoleteness, which is embedded into a DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEM based on ANDRAGOGY and OMNIOLOGY. The ultimate goal of this paradigm is to empower learners and help them take advantage of the enormous array of resources from the world environment in order to eliminate the current continuum of poverty and limitations.

This will become a crude reality with respect for, and practice of, human and community rights through experiences, investigations, practicum work, and/ or examinations. Everything takes place in a setting that fosters diversity; with advisors and consultants with doctorate degrees and specializations in Human Development monitor learning processes, in addition to a worldwide web of colleagues and associations, so that they can reach the satisfaction and the progress of humanity with peace and harmony.

Contact us to get started

Now, it’s possible to earn your degree in the comfort of your own home. For additional information or to see if you qualify for admissions please contact us.

Pioneer Plaza / 900 Fort Street Mall 410 Honolulu, HI 96813
800-993-0066 (Toll Free in US) [email protected]
808-924-9567 (Internationally) www.aiu.edu

Online application:

https://www.aiu.edu/apply3_phone.aspx