Two articles published

23, 2018. One of our graduates, Cleopas Njerekai, has published 2 articles on the Journal of Tourism & Hospitality. You can read both of his in utilizing public revenues for the development of needy community. Especially young adults must review the current stock of public revenue utilization and active participation in parliament and legislature debates of their representatives for the welfare of regions; effective utilization of available resources to reduce exploitation. In this direction political party’s role is vital; because most of the young educated generation is ready to take risk in supporting their beloved leader and trust his vision in creating more employment opportunities through rural entrepreneurship as well as SME’s is one of the cornered area. ... Find more information about his book: https://www. morebooks.de/store/gb/book/ political-and-economic-model/ isbn/978-613-9-82430-4 Dr. Jagadeesha Marigowda completed a Doctorate program in International Business at AIU. articles on the provided links: Staffing and Working Conditions of Employees in Chinese Restaurants in Zimbabwe: Justifiable?: https://www.omicsonline.org/ open-access/staffing-and-working- conditions-of-employees-inchinese- restaurants-inzimbabwejustifiable- 2167-0269-1000341.pdf A Critique of the Methodological Approach to Hotel Guest Green Consumerism Empirical Researches Since 2000: https://www.arcjournals. org/pdfs/ijrth/v4-i1/2.pdf Dr. Cleopas Njerekai completed a Doctorate program in Tourism at Atlantic International University.

6th book published

July 1, 2018. One of our graduates, Jagadeesha Marigowda, has published his 6th book, “Political and Economic Model”. Book Summary: This book is intended to create awareness about political volatility, integrity of elected representatives in utilizing public revenues for the development of needy community. Especially young adults must review the current stock of public revenue utilization and active participation in parliament and legislature debates of their representatives for the welfare of regions; effective utilization of available resources to reduce exploitation. In this direction political party’s role is vital; because most of the young educated generation is ready to take risk in supporting their beloved leader and trust his vision in creating more employment opportunities through rural entrepreneurship as well as SME’s is one of the cornered area. ... Find more information about his book: https://www. morebooks.de/store/gb/book/ political-and-economic-model/ isbn/978-613-9-82430-4 Dr. Jagadeesha Marigowda completed a Doctorate program in International Business at AIU.

Graduated with Honors

July, 2018. These graduate students completed the majority of the requirements to obtain honors, which included a 4.0 GPA, published works, recommendation from their respective advisors, patent a product, etc. Congratulations to all of them!


19TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON Knowledge, Culture, and Change in Organizations

Call for Papers This Conference will be held 21–22 February 2019 at UBC Robson Square, Vancouver, Canada. We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/ interactive sessions, posters/ exhibits, colloquia, focused discussions, innovation showcases, virtual posters, or virtual lightning talks. Theme 1: Management Education Theme 2: Change Management Theme 3: Knowledge Management Theme 4: Organizational Cultures 2019 Special Focus: The New Story of Organizing. Scope and concerns: Organizational Intangibles and their Tangible Value · Knowledge Economy · Knowledge in Organizations · Culture in Organizations · Change in Organizations. Become a Presenter: 1. Submit a proposal 2. Review timeline 3. Register Submit your proposal by 6 August 2018 Early Registration Deadline 21 August 2018 Visit the website: http://organization-studies.com

Recognition for our graduate

july 13, 2018. One of our graduates, Emperador Pérez, has received the recognition "Academician of Honor" by Dr. Otto Von Feigenblatt, Earl of Kobryn, Hon. Ambassador of the Republic of Kosovo, of the European nobility and Baron of Feigenblatt-Miller, of the Academy of Doctors of Spain and of the International Academy of Social Sciences, during an event held at Unicaribe College. Dr. Emperador Pérez has completed a PhD program in Business Economics with honors Suma Cum Laude in AIU.

14TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON Interdisciplinary Social Sciences

Call for Papers This Conference will be held 10–12 July 2019 at Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana in Mexico City, Mexico. We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/ interactive sessions, posters/ exhibits, colloquia, focused discussions, innovation showcases, virtual posters, or virtual lightning talks. Theme 1: Social and Community Studies Theme 2: Civic and Political Studies Theme 3: Cultural Studies Theme 4: Global Studies Theme 5: Environmental Studies Theme 6: Organizational Studies Theme 7: Educational Studies Theme 8: Communication 2019 Special Focus: Global flows, diversified realities. Become a Presenter: 1. Submit a proposal 2. Review timeline 3. Register Advance Registration Deadline 10 October 2018 Visit the website: http://thesocialsciences.com


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Sergio Andres Cavesas
Bachelor of Science
Cyber Security
Argentina
Maria Cristina Coronel
Bachelor of Human Resources
Human Resources
Argentina
Nancy Graciela Elena Savino
Bachelor of Science
Psychology
Argentina
Deri, Angel Dario
Bachelor of Science
Neuroscience
Argentina
María Eugenia Márquez Piazze
Bachelor of Science
Chemical Engineering
Argentina
Stella Marys Peso
Doctor of Education
Neuroeducation
Argentina
           
Ogu Ikpenma Maureen
Bachelor of Social and Human Studies
Psychology
Argentina
Tethloach Domach Ruey
Doctor of Science
International Relations
Australia
Gaolebe Kgatlhego
Bachelor of Business Administration
Banking and Finance
Botswana
Matthews Lebogang Phiri
Doctor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
Botswana
Giovanni Carlos Lorusso Montiel
Doctor of Science
Artificial Intelligence
Canada
Ansu Keifala
Bachelor of Science
Mining Engineering
Canada
           
Fernanda Mendes A. Silva Mascarenhas
Doctor of Philosophy
Project Management
Cape Verde
Cristian Rodrigo Navarro Palma
Bachelor of Architecture
Digital Design
Chile
Verónica Elena Calderón Fuenzalida
Bachelor of Science
Psychology
Chile
Alejandro Gaitán Hurtado
Doctor of Science
Psychology
Colombia
Javier Novoa Cuervo
Master of Civil Engineering
Construction Projects Management
Colombia
Juan Esteban Aguirre Espinosa
Master of Science
Political Science
Colombia
           
Ernesto Gómez Echeverri
Doctor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
Colombia
Kabera Linga Alain
Master of Science
Comp uter Science
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Juan Luis Rafael Guerrero Peralta
Doctor of Legal Studies
International Criminal Justice
Dominican Republic
Sergio Feliz Rubio
Doctor of Sociology
Analysis of Bullying in Schools
Dominican Republic
Yeral Ogando
Bachelor of Education
English as a Second Language
Dominican Republic
Juan Bautista Martinez Morales
Master of Arts
App lied Linguistics for Sec. Lang. Teaching
Dominican Republic
           
Luis Zabdiel De la Cruz Perdomo
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business and Finance
Dominican Republic
Wilson Manuel De Los Santos Matias
Bachelor of Science
Civil Engineering
Dominican Republic
Jorge Vinicio Freire Cervera
Master of Science
Exterior Comm erce
Ecuador
Yvonne Margarita Guerra Rodríguez
Bachelor of Business Administration
Accounting and Auditing
Ecuador
Cristian Andrés Viteri Cervantes
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
Ecuador
Sandra Mariel Toapanta Pazmiño
Doctor of Philosophy
Public Health
Ecuador
           
Rommel Santiago Salazar Carrera
Bachelor of Science
Industrial Design Engineering
Ecuador
Kleber Ramiro Cabezas Rea
Bachelor of Science
Telecomm unications Engineering
Ecuador
Pablo Sebastián Buse Velásquez
Bachelor of Science
Industrial Engineering
Ecuador
Pablo Ntutumu Bacale Ayetebe
Doctor of Science
Food Engineering
Equatorial Guinea
Fernando Ndong Nguema Maye
Master of Business Administration
Marketing and Sales
Equatorial Guinea
Patricio Bakale Mba Medja
Master of Science
Sports Science
Equatorial Guinea
           
Baiza Belinda Abdallah
Doctor of Business Administration
Business and Adm inistration
Ghana
Ayim Kwadwo Evans
Master of Science
Project Management
Ghana
Hector A Duarte
Bachelor of Business Administration
Economics
Guatemala
Calvin Brutus
Post Doctorate of Science
Organizational Developm ent
Guyana
Wilmer Eliezer Díaz González
Doctor of Science
Chemical Engineering
Iraq
Aharon Zaide
Master of Science
Chemistry
Israel
           
Rowena Colleen Lypher
Bachelor of Education
Adult Education
Jamaica
Basem Mohammed Al-lozi
Post Doctorate of Economics
Economics
Jordan
James Kamau Murango
Bachelor of Science
Project Management
Kenya
Sisco Mbindi Mbith
Bachelor of Business and Economics
Logistics & Supp ly Chain Management
Kenya
Marwan Monier Hatoum
Bachelor of Science
Civil Engineering
Lebanon
Raghda Thini Fawaz
Bachelor of Architecture
Architecture
Liberia
           
Christopher Emeka Desmond
Bachelor of Business Administration
Banking and Finance
Luxembourg
Kone Djakalia
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Management
Mali
Varandinho Alberto Ali
Doctor of Philosophy
Public Policy and Adm inistration
Mozambique
Prosper Sinzotuma
Master of Management
Business Management
Mozambique
Mamadou Abdou Gaoh Sani
Doctor of Management
Management
Niger
Justina Obiageli Ohai
Doctor of Philosophy
Educational Psychology
Nigeria
           
Adetokunbo Modupe
Bachelor of Social Science
International Relations
Nigeria
Ochai Ufedo Adejoh
Doctor of Philosophy
Health Care Adm inistration
Nigeria
Aminu N. Mohammed
Master of Science
Finance
Nigeria
Aniefiok Joe Moses
Doctor of Philosophy
Public Health
Nigeria
Stanley Osazuwa Omobude
Master of Science
Business Adm inistration
Nigeria
Roberto Edmundo Angulo Alvarez
Bachelor of Economics
Economics
Peru
           
Mahamah Dango, Abdou
Doctor of Science
Renewable Energy
Senegal
Yayah Kamarakeh
Master of Science
Land Surveying
Sierra Leone
Derrick Cheong Chak Wah
Doctor of Science
Refrigeration & Air-Conditioning Technology
Singapore
James Sia Chee Beng
Doctor of Science
Refrigeration & Air-Conditioning Technology
Singapore
Brian Mupindu
Bachelor of Science
Electrical Engineering
South Africa
Uthayaraj Perumal Reddiar
Doctor of Education
Educational Leadership and Management
Sri Lanka
           
Lilian Ochoo
Bachelor of Arts
Journalism and Media Studies
South Sudan
Elfadil Musa Mohamed Ahmed
Doctor of Philosophy
Project Management
Sudan
Mohamed Turay
Doctor of Business Administration
Health Management Information Systems
Tanzania
Abdi Hussein Saleh
Bachelor of Arts
Journalism
Tanzania

Ahmed Shaker Abdulrahman
Bachelor of Science
Information Technology
UAE

Ammar Imad Wasfi
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
UAE
           
Faris Moh'd R. Abed Rabu
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
UAE
Lailat Salim Hemed
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
UAE
Mayar Ghazal
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
UAE
Sahar Kamal Taleb Naji
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
UAE
Aamna Ikram Abbasi
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
UAE
Mohamed Saif E. Abdel Rahim Ahmed
Bachelor of Business Administration
Business Adm inistration
UAE
           
Magda Dinor Valdez Ruvalcaba
Bachelor of Arts
Spanish Language
USA
Dante Christiam Arroyo Vega
Bachelor of Science
Environmental, Health and Safety
USA
Martha Abdullah
Bachelor of Science
Early Childhood and Education
USA
Jeff Garcia
Master of Science
Psychology and Coaching
USA
Gilbert Chimese Kasongo
Master of Finance
Finance
Zambia
Maria Odete Pedro Filho Melo
Bachelor of Science
Public Health
Zimbabwe
           
Wirimai Chimbongore
Doctor of Accounting
Accounting
Zimbabwe
         
           

Find More Graduates

Gallery: aiu.edu/Graduation/grids/currentgallery.html
Interviews: www.aiu.edu/Graduation/grids/interviews.html
This month we have graduates from: Argentina · Australia · Botswana · Canada · Cape Verde · Chile · Colombia · DR Congo · Dominican Republic · Ecuador · Equatorial Guinea · Ghana · Guatemala · Guyana · Iraq · Israel · Jamaica · Jordan · Kenya · Lebanon · Liberia · Luxembourg · Mali · Mozambique · Niger · Nigeria · Peru · Senegal · Sierra Leone · Singapore · South Africa · Sri Lanka · South Sudan · Sudan · Tanzania · UAE · USA · Zambia · Zimbabwe

Student Testimonials

Lilian Ochoo
Bachelor of Journalism
and Media Studies
July 3, 2018

“Its been a pleasure studying at Atlantic International University. The learning process at AIU has been so unique and manageable. Though it took me extra time than planned to attain my degree due to financial constraint, I must appreciate the academic team at AIU for making this a reality. The team kept me going and motivated towards studies. I remember receiving calls/emails from AIU academic staff with encouragement words towards my education throughout. Even when I felt like ending the process due to lack of finances, AIU kept me on move. Thanks to AIU for the scholarship rendered to me, otherwise, I would have not realized my goal. The other interesting part of my academic journey with AIU has been the accelerated learning process –the process is so encouraging, more so to students with experience in the fields of study. With my degree from AIU, I believe I will be able to move some steps forward in my job and career.
John Tarilanyo Afa
Doctor of Electrical Engineering
January 4, 2012

“If sometimes one lack words to express a situation, my experience in AIU was one. I stumble at this website when my desire for reading for a doctorate was at its peak. I feel quite excited when my submission was approved for the doctorate in Electrical Engineering. While I was on my first phase with my little knowledge of computer, I felt very degusted with so many unanswered questions. At that time the academic department at every mail became a motivator that kept me moving. The day I checked my records (transcript), I found out that these thing I felt not relevant were the foundation. AIU is unique, in that every thing that is done is given the required attention and priority. The acceptance and the motivation became a springboard for my accelerated advancement. I like AIU because they are up to something, very focused and they do exactly what they have laid down. Due to my personal curriculum design, I have known more about my environment. Read full text: https://aiu.edu/Testimonials.aspx?Ite mID=810&rcid=73&pcid=63&cid=73
Senthil Seliyan
Bachelor of Civil Engineering
January 10, 2008

“One of the best decisions I ever made was to become an AIU student. Before joining with AIU graduation was nightmare for me as working and studying together is crucial. AIU makes possible graduation while working. I had well experience with AIU as I was preparing assignment with own pace of study at convenient time. Throughout my educational experience at AIU, I have learned to become more independent in everything I do. It was a very challenging time for me. AIU has changed my life for the better. The academic activities are structured in such a way that I was able to manage my time and at my pace to comfortably complete the program. Atlantic International University, thank you very much of the opportunity that you have granted me and I know that with God’s help I will do and see great things from this day forth.timonials.aspx?Ite mID=1469&rcid=73&pcid=63&cid=73
John Roland Jr.
Bachelor of Resource Recovery
January 13, 2005

“Due to the nature of my work and the hours involved, it has been difficult to attend a conventional university with set hours for classroom instructions. From the very start, I found the staff and advisors at AIU, both cordial and professional in their advisement to assist me in achieving my goal without loosing the past credits and also incorporating my life experiences into credits towards my degree. I found the method of study employed by AIU to be more challenging than that of a conventional classroom. The research involved in writing my final thesis demanded much of my time and energy, yet I feel that it was worth it. I would recommend AIU to anyone seeking a degree because of the above mentioned qualities, but most of all, for the helpful and sincere advice that was given me when I needed help in my endeavor.




Find more testimonials from AIU s tudents here: www.aiu.edu/Testimonials.aspx


Addressing barriers of nursing and midwifery practice autonomy in Ghana

George Yaw Segnitome | Doctor of Community Public Health | Part 2/2



Diminishing opportunities for training, education and professional development The Nurses and Midwifery Board of Australia14 states that nurses in general practice are required to undertake professional development. Midwives too. The accreditation standards of general practices in Australia also require nurses in general practice to be actively participating in continuing professional development and therefore infers a responsibility of the general practice to ensure that this occurs13. The Nursing and Midwifery Council of Ghana stresses continuous professional development (CPD) and this is contingent with the renewal of professional identification numbers (PIN). That notwithstanding the opportunity to go for further training in the area of long programme is dwindling. Informal information reveals that managers of Ghana Health Service (GHS) no longer sponsors nurses and midwives making advances for degree and masters programmes. Some hold the view that the levels do not bring value. Others say funds are not available to support long courses. In the contrary, undertaking education and training and credentialing provide nurses with additional skills to provide wider ranging care and to feel more confident about their role13. Similarly, frameworks for education and career pathways have been found to enhance the development of nurse-led care in the United Kingdom and New Zealand13.

Formal (policy, practice, statutory) barriers limiting services provided by nurses and midwives Regulations concerning whether or not Nurse Practitioners (NPs) can admit, manage, and discharge patients in a hospital are inconsistent and not always clear. Facility policies may interpret the requirements of the law as restricting NPs in independent practice regarding patient admission to, treatment in, and discharge from health care facilities; even though NPs are authorized to perform these functions in a separate portion of the Arizona Administrative Code. Within Yavapai County, Arizona, there are four hospitals –one federal, one rehabilitation, and two acute care hospitals13. Of the four facilities, the federal facility provides the most independent practice environment by far, in that it permits NPs to evaluate and treat patients in the outpatient, inpatient, and emergency room setting. With reference to the latter assertion, it is possible to make policies that will mandate nurses and midwives to evaluate and treat patients in the outpatient and inpatient setting. Where these functions are permitted they are not documented as “extended” roles so as to be considered for recognition. In a survey conducted by Drennan, J. et al16 it was observed that patients and parents were highly satisfied with the care they received from nurse/midwife prescribers and the majority were of the opinion that that nurses and midwives should have prescriptive authority. Non-recognition of Specializations in nursing and midwifery practices hampers the growth of nursing and midwifery. Generally, in Ghana there is no formal or structured recognition for nursing and midwifery specializations. Post basic programmes are available in nursing in Ghana. The basic programme places one at the entry point of a nurse or midwife upon completion of the professional course. An example is the three year programme in nursing or midwifery that enables one become a Registered Nurse or Registered Midwife in the case of Ghana. The post basic programmes have a duration of two (2) years at most. The duration of training might be inadequate for the products to be considered specialist in their field of study. A welcome development is the establishment of the Ghana College of Nurses and Midwives. The College was established and inaugurated on 23rd April 2013 under the provisions of the Specialist Health Training and Plant Medicine and Research Act 833 of 2011 (Part Three) and has a mission to promote specialist education and continuous professional development17. Nurse/Midwives specialist programmes would include paediatric nursing, accident and emergency, palliative care and oncology. The training for residents is for three (3) years full-time. It is hoped the graduates of the specialist programmes would be appropriately recognized by Ministry of Health, Ghana. In other jurisdictions, specialist posts were valued more by National Health Service trusts but also more by the nursing profession itself. The conclusion is that ways need to be found to reward and value the role of the nurse and midwife following specialization so that nursing and midwifery excellence can be recruited, retained and developed at the Ward or clinical level18.

Rurality Areas that create barriers for rural providers may provide opportunities in some ways for independent practice of NPs in rural areas. This is not always the case, and NPs are affected by rural practice issues like distance from support networks, professional isolation, lack of anonymity, spousal employment, long hours, and the requirement to be an ”expert generalist”15. One widely reported effects of practicing in a rural setting is lack of anonymity. The lack of anonymity refers to the lack of separation between personal and professional lives that occurs in rural communities. This lack of anonymity contributes to the trusted and knowledgeable status conferred upon the “old-timer”, or the individual who is known to the community, lived in the community for an extended period, and owns land. Lack of anonymity has been cited as an advantage for the rural nurse practitioner who may interact with patients outside the practice setting raising the question of whether it is a barrier or advantage15. Another significant barrier faced by the rural nurse/ midwife practitioner (NMP) is professional isolation. Isolation has been defined in the literature as “an actual separation from or a deficiency in a resource needed to fulfil professional responsibilities or needs”. Rural professional isolation of the Nurse or midwife is a barrier frequently raised in studies on rural practice. Isolation from continuing education has been an issue for both nursing and medicine and the decrease comfort level of providers in performing complex or infrequently practiced skills may be a quality concern. For the rural nurse/ midwife practitioner, issues of role confusion and workplace barriers compound professional isolation, may make it more difficult to collaborate in interdisciplinary settings. Other effects of isolation are lack of peer support and knowledge decay15. While rural populations tend to be older, poorer, and sicker than urban populations, they have fewer resources available to provide treatment comparable to urban practices15. Clearly the nurse-midwife is the “expert generalist” in the rural setting where they enjoy some level of health services autonomy. The disadvantages encountered in the area far outweigh the advantages. The factors to attract, retain them and sustain their practices need to be addressed. For instance, as part of their social responsibility telecommunication companies should make their services felt at the remotest of communities particularly in localities where health facilities are sited. The government should negotiate for the location of the telecommunication facilities. It has been established that rural people have developed economic and social links beyond their locality due to improved transport and communication means. Transportation, telephone and internet have superimposed communication and travel patterns that allow rural people to shop, utilise services and participate in recreation well beyond the local community19. The telecommunication network will draw the health personnel towards their peers and the rest of the world. In addition, the employer should institute what is known as Herzberg Factor Two (Hygiene Factors) placing premium on achievements, recognition and responsibility and of course, working conditions and remuneration20. It has also been found that financial and non-financial incentives such as better housing and accelerated promotions were moderately effective but preferential access to training and career development opportunities were very powerful nonfinancial strategies in motivating nurses to work in rural and remote areas.




CONCLUSION From the discussions we reckon that teamwork among health providers, opportunity for training, education and professional continuous development, clear policy blue-print, according specialist nurses and midwives the needed recognition, supporting and promoting the Herzberg Factor Two (Hygiene Factor) in the urban as well as the rural settings are essential means by which nursing and midwifery autonomy can be realized. The absence of these factors would make nursing and midwifery autonomy a non-starter.

RECOMMENDATION It is my candid opinion that the following be considered in the promotion of nursing and midwifery autonomy: To ensure that other professionals recognize the worth of nurses and midwives, we should demonstrate competence by designing and implementing models of patient care. The need to revive the Nursing Care Plan and make it user-friend in the clinics and hospital is long overdue. In addition nurses should demonstrate solidarity towards one another and be assertive and supportive of nursing and midwifery agenda. Need to develop Frameworks for education and career pathways to enhance the development of nurse led care. Responsibility lies with NMCG, GRNMA and GCNM. The NMCG and GRNA should collaborate to identify or review and document the expanded and or extended roles of nurses and midwives for determination by the MOH/GHS as policy There is the need to display the roles so identified at facility levels for appreciation by the public. NMCG and GCNM should determine and declare specialty programmes in nursing and midwifery and recommend same for appropriate recognition by the employer so that nursing and midwifery excellence can be recruited, retained and developed. Government should consider financial and nonfinancial incentives such as better working environments and housing as effective strategies for the rural nurses and midwives Accelerated promotions, in-service training and career development opportunities are powerful non-financial strategies in motivating nurses and midwives to work in rural and remote areas MOH/GHS to be responsible. Government should facilitate the provision of telecommunication services at the remotest of communities particularly in localities where health facilities are sited. The End

REFERENCES
1. Merriam Webster Dictionary. | 2. www.collinsdictionary.com. Accessed October 3, 2013. | 3. Wikipedia of the Free Encyclopaedia | 4. An Bord Altranais (2006). Nursing Board Scope of Practice, Supporting a Standard through Interactive Learning (http://www.nursingboard. ie/Scope/default.asp. Accessed on October 5, 2013) | 5. Batey Marjorie V and Lewis Francois (1982). Clarifying Autonomy and Accountability in Nursing Service. Accessed at https://www.researchgate.net on October 6, 2013. | 6. Kathleen A. Russel. Nurse Practice Acts Guide and Govern Nursing Practice. Retrieved at https://www.ncsbn.org/2012_JNR_NPA_ Guide.pdf on October 4, 2013. | 7. American College of Nurse-Midwives www.midwife.org. Retrieved on October 4, 2013. | 8. Nursing and Midwifery Council of Ghana. Functions. Retrieved at http://www.nmcgh.org/operations/ examination/9-featured/3-functions. Accessed on October 4, 2013. | 9. Nurses and Midwives Decree, 1972, National Redemption Council Decree (NRCD) 117, Article 39 subsection ‘h’) | 10. Legislative Instrument (L.I) 683 of the Nurses Regulations, 1971 of the 4th Schedule (Regulation 12 (2) | 11. www.campaignforaction.org/site, Retrieved on October 5, 2013. | 12. Eley D, et al (2012). Outcomes and opportunities: a nurse led model of chronic disease management in Australian general practice. Retrieved at http://espace.curtin.edu.au on October 6, 2013. | 13. Nursing competency standards in primary healthcare: an integrative review http://www.thesandsingpframework.com/documents/MML%20Literature%20 review.pdf. | 14. Nursing and Midwifer Board of Australia (2012). Continuous professional development-Retrieved at www.nursingmidwiferyboard. gov.au/documents/default.aspx?records. Accessed on October 8, 2013 | 15. Michael_MS_Reports www.nursing.arizona.edu/library/091_Frost. Accessed on October 8, 2013. | 16. Drennan J et al (2009) Independent Evaluation of the Nurse and Midwife Prescribing Initiative. University College Dublin, (www.hse.ie/eng/services/Publications/services/./prescribing_ initiative. Accessed on October 12, 2013). | 17. Jemima A. Denis-Antwi (Unpublished). Request for Submission of Candidates for 2014/15 Academic Year. | 18. Royal College Nursing (2009) (http://www.rcn.org. uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/287784/003312.pdf. Accessed on October 12, 2013) | 19. Starting Strong Rural Community Economic Development Planning & Assessment Guide January 2011. Retrieved athttp://www. bankofideas.com.au/Downloads/Rural_Revitalisation Accessed on October 11, 2013. | 20. Herzberg's Motivators and Hygiene Factors. Retrieved at http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTMM_74.htm. Accessed on October 12, 2013.

INCIDENCES OF Interactive Digital Whiteboard IN THE TEACHING PRACTICE

Leidy D. Berroa M. | Post-doctorate in Educational Research


The 21st century confronts its citizens with new choices, opportunities and challenges due to the omnipresent trend of technology in all spheres of life: business and administration, government, education, economy and society itself. The profound changes experienced in the academic field must be seen with thoughts about the possibilities that new technologies imply.

The history of the interactive whiteboard goes back to the year 1990. It was similar to the computer with touch screen and mainly used for commercial presentations. The first plate that used the projection was the Smart Board in 1991 (Benassi, V.A., Overson, C.E., and Hakala, C.M., 2014). The cost of this new presentation device was quite high, so the IWB took several years to pass from use at business meetings to universities and even later to elementary schools. During the last ten years, the number of IWB in schools has increased very rapidly. The first IWB in the Czech school was in 1998 (Neumajer, 2012). By way of illustration, ZŠ Komenského in Trutnov has 17 IWBs at this time, when the first was purchased in 2006 (ZŠ Komenského, 2017).

The traditional paradigms of teaching and learning have been shaken by the impact of the integration of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in educational practices, while teachers and trainers face challenges ranging from the acquisition of skills and literacy in the use of ICT for the delivery of the necessary tools that will lead students to become creators of knowledge and users. Thus, deeply immersed in the knowledge society, a society based on the critical, rational and reflective use of global and distributed information (Badarch, 2013) in which the most outstanding communication media are telematic networks, one of the largest Challenges to be overcome on our way to the 21st century is to train teachers and students to achieve competence and mastery over the use of technology instead of letting them be enslaved by it. The widespread use of ICT in all areas has a direct effect on the way in which the world is perceived. The permanent presence of telematic networks in all areas of life allows unlimited access to information and a relaxation of time and space barriers. ICT has shaken traditional approaches to teaching and learning and poses new challenges to the educational community, challenges that arise along with new teaching and learning environments and modes of instruction, mainly set in virtuality.

A deep integration of new technologies in education as a central means for teaching and learning processes will inevitably require teachers to change attitudes and teaching paradigms, such changes will force them to adapt to new methodological approaches, educational concepts and aspects of management, which will have to be established in technology-rich environments. Therefore, open and flexible teaching and learning processes, especially the use of interactive whiteboards, interactive and bidirectional communication systems, together with the emergence of alternative spaces designed to promote communication generate new needs and expectations that must be met the educators. The use of ICT in education favors interaction and collaboration among participants in the education sector. The focus of this research focuses on three main subjects: on the use and competence of ICT, on the teacher and the school community, and on the learning environment and teaching practices. This research is closely related to the national education policy, which seeks the implementation of ICT in pedagogical practices in all areas and institutional levels.

Start writing your assignment before you study

Edward Lambert | AIU Academic Coordinator


At AIU, a student is required to submit an assignment each month. So how can you start and finish a course in one month? The secret is to start writing your assignment even before you start to study the material. Normally a student will study a course by completing all of the reading before they start to write the assignment. This is not the best way to do an assignment.

The best way is to get an idea of what the assignment will be about, then start writing and preparing the assignment right away before you start to study. You open the template of an assignment for AIU. The template has a cover page, introduction, place for the body of the assignment, a conclusion and a bibliography. You prepare the cover page with your name and title of the course. Then you write a brief introduction to the subject matter that you will study. Your assignment is already partly done. You will write your assignment as you study. What are the advantages of started an assignment before you study? • As you study, you will be able to write as you develop ideas. Normally as you read, you have opinions and reactions fresh in the moment that you are reading. You want to write those ideas immediately into your assignment. Then all you have to do is edit the writing before you submit the essay. The editing part is easy because the ideas are already written. • It forces you to focus your studies in your topic. When you write your assignment as you study, the assignment is actually guiding your studies. As you write, you will think of a topic to write about, then you can focus your reading on that topic. Then you can develop that topic better because you are reading and developing the ideas directly into your assignment.

• You can measure how many pages that you need to write each day in order to finish your essay. Suppose that you want to write an essay of 15 pages. Consequently, you want to write roughly 1 page per day in your assignment. If after 10 days of studying, you have 6 pages written, then you know that you need to write 9 pages in the next 10 days. Or if you have written 12 pages in 13 days, then you know that you need to write 3 pages in the next 7 days. As you see how many pages you need to write, you can better measure the topics that you need to study to complete your assignment. • If you need to write more pages, then you can do more research. If you have completed the reading, but still do not have enough pages written, then you can choose supplemental study material to get more ideas. You can search for another source of material, like another book or video. Then include your thoughts and opinions about the other book or video. You will know earlier in your writing process if you need more material, because you have been writing as you study.

All you need to do is try this for one assignment. Then you will know that this is the best way to write an assignment. Start writing your assignment with a template even before you start studying. It will much easier to finish an assignment each and every month.

Learning

Gentleman's Club

Teacher creates it to teach life lessons to boys.

A teacher is going above and beyond to help young boys in his community become young gentlemen. Every Wednesday nearly 60 students at Memminger Elementary School dress for success and meet for the "Gentlemen's Club." Raymond Nelson is the student support specialist at Memminger Elementary in Downtown Charleston, South Carolina. He works with at-risk children and over winter break thought of an idea to teach his students life lessons. “I was thinking maybe if I have the boys dress for success,” Nelson said to WCSC-TV. “When was the last time you saw someone fighting in a tuxedo?” Nelson started The Gentlemen's Club. Their motto is: “Look good, feel good, do good.” Every Wednesday, dozens of first through fifth graders walk into class in their Sunday's best. “I know a lot of them struggle because a lot of them don't have men at home, so I just want them to grow up and think of the things that I teach them,” Nelson said. “They like the reaction of walking up to classrooms and say, 'Oh, you look so nice and handsome,' they just love it.” Nelson even keeps a stash of donated jackets, vests and ties at school for kids who don't have their own. “A lot of my students perform well when they know someone cares about them,” Nelson said.
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Kids born today...

“ ...will never get to drive a car, expert asserts.

For many, learning how to drive is a rite of passage that teenagers pine for. Getting behind the wheel for the first time, passing drivers ed, getting your license, and buying your first car symbolize your first steps towards independence. But one expert believes it’s a milestone that teens of the future won’t experience. “My own prediction is that kids born today will never get to drive a car,” says Henrik Christensen, who heads UC San Diego’s Contextual Robotics Institute. “Autonomous, driverless cars are 10, 15 years out. All the automotive companies –Daimler, GM, Ford– are saying that within five years they will have autonomous, driverless cars on the road.” By now, we’ve already learned to live with all the downsides of driving. Sitting in traffic is certainly better walking to and from work; wasting time looking for parking is better than elbowing through crowds to get a seat on the subway. But Christensen argues that these activities could soon be a thing of the past. Driverless cars will not only allow us to put twice as many vehicles on the road, with little to no effort to improve current infrastructure, they also give us a chance to be more productive. ...
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The basis of the universe

...may not be energy or matter, but information.

There are lots of theories on what the basis of the universe is. Some physicists say its subatomic particles. Others believe its energy or even spacetime. One of the more radical theories suggests that information is the most basic element of the cosmos. Although this line of thinking emanates from the mid-20th century, it seems to be enjoying a bit of a Renaissance among a sliver of prominent scientists today. Consider that if we knew the exact composition of the universe and all of its properties and had enough energy and know-how to draw upon, theoretically, we could break the universe down into ones and zeroes and using that information, reconstruct it from the bottom up. It’s the information, purveyors of this view say, locked inside any singular component that allows us to manipulate matter any way we choose. Of course, it would take deity-level sophistication, a feat only achievable by a type V civilization on the Kardashev scale. Mid-20th century mathematician and engineer Claude Elwood Shannon, is thought the creator of classical information theory. Though few know of him outside of scientific circles, he’s being hailed today as the “father of the digital age.” Shannon’s spark of genius came in 1940 at MIT, when he noticed a relationship between Boolean algebra and telephone switching circuits. Soon after, he was hired by Bell Labs to devise the most efficient way to transfer information over wires. ...
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New X-Ray technology

Produces striking 3D images in full color.

A new medical imaging device uses technology developed by particle physicists to produce full-color, 3D images of the human body. Phil and Anthony Butler, a father and son team in New Zealand who teach physics and bioengineering, respectively, have been developing the technology for a decade through their company MARS Bioimaging. The scanner uses hybrid-pixel technology called Medipix3, which was initially developed for the Large Hadron Collider. “The original concept of Medipix is that it works like a camera, detecting and counting each individual particle hitting the pixels when its electronic shutter is open,” reads a statement from CERN “This enables high-resolution, high-contrast, very reliable images, making it unique for imaging applications in particular in the medical field.” Traditional X-rays produce a black image when passing through soft tissue and a white image when absorbed by denser bone material. The Medipix3 detector, however, “is able to measure how specific energies of X-rays are being attenuated” and can differentiate between bone, muscle, metal, fats and liquid. This level of sensitivity enables the technology to produce a strikingly realistic representation of the internal body. ...
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Birds in flight



Syntopia is the latest haute couture collection from Dutch fashion designer Iris van Herpen. The line of beautifully pleated garments explores the increasing convergence of our organic bodies and inorganic elements of technology, while also incorporating designs inspired by birds in flight. “As a former dancer, the transformation within movement has hypnotized me,” explained van Herpen. “For this collection I looked closely at the minutiae of bird flight and the intricate echoing forms within avian motion.”
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Super suit



As the global population ages, many more people will experience challenges with mobility. One solution? Clothing that actually helps the wearer move. Electronics that can be worn on the body are about more than personal convenience. A new kind of wearable technology may help. A lightweight, comfortable ‘super suit’ designed by Seismic –a wearable robotics spin-off from the non-profit research centre SRI International– works with the user’s muscles to help boost their power. The suit’s ‘electric muscles', powered by tiny motors, contract in a way that mimics human muscle. These electric muscles are integrated into the clothing around the joints of the body and attached via grips in the clothing. These grips function like tendons in the human body.
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Appetite

How your age affects it.

We all need food every day, but our changing relationship with it through the years can have a big impact on our health. While hunger –our body’s way of making us desire food when it needs feeding– is a part of appetite, it is not the only factor. Our appetite is also not fixed, it changes across our lifespan as we age. As Shakespeare might have put it, there are seven ages of appetite, and a better understanding of these phases could help us to develop new ways of tackling under-eating and overconsumption, along with the health effects, such as obesity, that follow. In early childhood, the body goes through rapid growth and dietary behaviour built up in early life can extend into adulthood, leading a fat child to become a fat adult. In the teenage years, a growth in appetite and stature driven by hormones, signals the arrival of puberty. How a teenager approaches food during this critical period will shape their lifestyle choices in later years. As young adults, lifestyle changes such as going to college, getting married or living with a partner, and parenthood can promote weight gain. Adult working life brings other challenges beyond a rumbling stomach, but also the effects of stress, which has been shown to prompt changes in appetite and eating habits in 80% of the population ...
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How does brain process speech?

Now we know the answer, and it’s fascinating.

Neuroscientists have known that speech is processed in the auditory cortex for some time, along with some curious activity within the motor cortex. How this last cortex is involved though, has been something of a mystery, until now. A new study by two NYU scientists reveals one of the last holdouts to a process of discovery which started over a century and a half ago. In 1861, French neurologist Pierre Paul Broca identified what would come to be known as “Broca’s area.” This is a region in the posterior inferior frontal gyrus. This area is responsible for processing and comprehending speech, as well as producing it. Interestingly, a fellow scientist, whom Broca had to operate on, was post-op missing Broca’s area entirely. Yet, he was still able to speak. He couldn’t initially make complex sentences, however, but in time regained all speaking abilities. This meant another region had pitched in, and a certain amount of neuroplasticity was involved. In 1871, German neurologist Carl Wernicke discovered another area responsible for processing speech through hearing, this time in the superior posterior temporal lobe. It’s now called Wernicke’s area. ... Read full text:

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Surf and turf

Trying to reduce gas emissions from cows, scientists are looking to the ocean.



Scientists think they can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by tweaking the food that cows eat. A recent experiment from the University of California, Davis suggests that adding seaweed to cattle feed can dramatically decrease their emissions of the potent gas methane. Livestock is a major source of greenhouse gases worldwide. About quarter of the methane emissions due to human activity in the U.S. can be chalked up to gas released from these animals, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. There's a pen at the University of California, Davis, where scientists were closely observing 12 research cows on a recent morning. Each animal is known by a four digit number —except for the friendliest one. “We just call her Ginger, she's the only one with a name,” laughs graduate student Breanna Roque. On this morning, Roque is mixing up breakfast for the research cows. She's pulling out dark, gooey clumps of a seaweed species called Asparagopsis armata. “I'll sprinkle it in, I'll kind of rub it together with the hay, mix it around, and then we actually come through and pitchfork the whole ration,” she says. ... Read full text:

Palm oil alternatives

Would they do more harm than good?

We need action on palm oil, that is absolutely not open for debate. But, a new report suggests that the alternatives we have to this environmentally damaging edible oil actually might do more harm than good. This alarming report comes from the respected International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), perhaps most familiar to animal lovers as the organization that composes the endangered wildlife list, the Red List. The IUCN report, “Oil Palms and Biodiversity“, takes an impartial look at current palm oil forestry practices and compares them with other crops that could substitute for palm oil. The report found that palm oil’s impact on threatened species is as terrible as other reports have also suggested. In fact, the forest-clearing required to grow and harvest palm oil currently impacts 193 threatened species on the IUCN Red List. Those are just its endangered animals and does not necessarily cover species that are currently faring okay but may be vulnerable in the future. Orangutans and tigers are among the most severely at risk from oil palm cultivation and harvesting. ...
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New tiny house village

It is in Seattle, for women only.

Atiny, new community is taking shape within Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood with the aim of helping homeless women return to sheltered living. The homes in what’s called Whittier Heights Village, north of 80th Street, are part of a growing trend in Seattle of using 100-square-foot structures to provide housing, security and stability to unsheltered people. This tiny house village —funded through public and private donations— will be the eighth of its kind in Seattle but the first that will serve exclusively one gender. “It’s a need in the community. There’s a lot of homeless women. Some of them feel more comfortable in a single-sex environment,” said Sharon Lee, executive director of the Low Income Housing Institute, an affordable housing developer that manages the city’s tiny house villages. Lee said the village will welcome women who are mothers or are pregnant, seniors, veterans and same-sex female couples. Whittier Heights Village should be completed by the end of this month, Lee said. Some of the first residents are already lined up. Not only is the new tiny house community for women, it’s being built predominantly by women, too. Weekend work parties have drawn dozens of female volunteers skilled in trades —carpenters, electricians, plumbers, painters and more, Lee said. ...
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Starving wolf saved

Group finds it with its head trapped in a plastic container.

An endangered Indian wolf was spotted in a lake area in Nagpur, central India, by a group of amateur nature photographers, and their images show the state of the starving animal. It is thought the wolf would have been looking for food inside the container, and ended up getting stuck, becoming more and more malnourished over time. Tanay Panpalia, a 26-year-old accountant from Nagpur, spotted the wolf while out taking photos with his friends, and the group embarked on a rescue mission. After calling the Nagpur Forest Department, they spent two hours tracking the wolf until a rescue team arrived and were able to cut the container off. Mr Panpalia said: “It was a plastic container ... I and two friends had ventured to the lake in order to take photos of birds, but we were also hoping to capture some images of wolves. When we saw a pack of them we were so excited and decided to follow them for a while to take photos when we suddenly found a young wolf whose head was stuck in a plastic container. The other wolves watched us from a distance –we were scared as there were only three of us and ten of them. ... Thankfully, the plastic container had holes in it which was allowing him to breathe and drink water –it's probably what kept him alive. ... I documented the whole story so that it might make people more aware of how their rubbish affects wildlife.”
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Campus

5 essential philosophical schools

For understanding (and loving) existence.

1 PESSIMISM. Pessimism invites a consideration of the negativity of existence and reflection on it. It’s no secret that life presents pain, suffering, illness, death and similar situations and emotions. Do we do well to evade them? Pessimistic philosophers would say no, that to do so is to amputate life itself, to take away something that is its own and, even, that these things are necessary for the experience of life in its fullness. What to read? Arthur Schopenhauer (The Wisdom of Life, The World as Will and Representation), Friedrich Nietzsche (The Gay Science and Ecce Homo).

2 NIHILISM. Nihil means “nothing” in Latin. The “nothingness” to which the philosophical current refers might be compared to the primordial nothing hypothetically preceding the beginning of the Universe. Practically everything surrounding us is the result of change and accident. Morals, customs, social institutions, ideas, and all of our most common practices: everything can also not be, and therefore, everything is also susceptible to change. What to read? Friedrich Nietzsche (Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Twilight of the Idols).

3 EXISTENTIALISM. If philosophy was in itself intended as a discipline for the examination of human life, it might be said that the roots of existentialism extend from the days of Plato’s Symposium to contemporary discussions of Byung Chul-Han. But don’t think that this makes it ambiguous. Perhaps our species is the only one able to make an enigma of itself, and perhaps we’re the only ones who need to understand our lives in order to live them. What to read? Albert Camus (The Myth of Sisyphus) and Jean-Paul Sartre above all. But their ramifications are a little more vast and diverse. Søren Kierkegaard (Repetition) was an avant la lettre existentialist, and some consider Tolstoy’s essays and even Dostoevsky’s novels (House of the Dead) as true explorations of the human soul. Also read Miguel de Unamuno and José Ortega y Gasset.

4 STOICISM. Especially popular in the days of the Roman Empire. It might be said that the essence of Stoicism is a reminder that life is a continual opportunity to be virtuous, fortune and misfortune, happiness and pain, daily tasks and pleasures. Virtue is the compass allowing us to navigate these seas of existence without losing our direction or forgetting the heights of our mission. What to read? The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, the Moral Epistles of Lucilius or De Brevitate Vitae (On the Shortness of Life) by Seneca the Younger, and The Discourses by Epictetus.

5 HEDONISM. A philosophy of life and reflection with pleasure as its guiding principle. Although it sounds like a life of sensuality, parties, and banquets, the truth is that, philosophically, pleasure is also a category that needs to be examined to be exercised. Would you be happy if you ate what you like every day? Is the pleasure you feel for any activity genuine? Or is it merely that you learned to enjoy what you were taught? What to read? A fresh and luminous approach to the subject can be found in a contemporary French thinker, Michel Onfray. His book Theorie Du Corps Amoureux (Theory of the Body in Love) is a scholarly, intelligent review of the ways philosophy and society have approached sexual pleasure. The book also includes a passionate defense of the ideas of Epicurus (the greatest of the hedonists). Source:

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Apogee.

Moon nightlight lamp. Two color modes: Warm yellow and Lunar white. Easy and convenient USB charging. faradayscienceshop.com

Pumpkin coin purse.

Inspired by Yayoi Kusama’s iconic pumpkin sculptures, this small leather coin purse features a charming retro design. Made in Japan, the purse has a purple grosgrain lining.
store.moma.org

Dialogue of book lovers.

Metal Bookends. Show the hit parade of your favourite books on a shelf or desk. One can never underestimate the meaning of reading in our lives. By DesignAtelierArticle. www.etsy.com

–Chief Phil Lane Jr. (1944–).

“The human soul has no gender, race, ethnicity or class.”

–Chief Phil Lane Jr. (1944–). An internationally recognized indigenous leader in human and community development.

Neil Gaiman's 8 rules for writing

1. Write. 2. Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down. 3. Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it. 4. Put it aside. Read it pretending you’ve never read it before. Show it to friends whose opinion you respect and who like the kind of thing that this is. 5. Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong. To be continued
Source:


Bachelor of Agricultural Economics

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

The Bachelor of Agrictultural Economics degree unites economic analysis with the practical aspects of agriculture. The program is intended to specialize students for careers in research, teaching, analysis, business administration and similar fields of agricultural economics. We will guide you to be successful in the field and to raise awareness of the social and environmental responsibilities of agriculture. The Agrictultural Economics program is designed to advance the professional development of experienced economics graduates and professionals in the economics arena by extending their knowledge and equipping them with broad research and process economics skills, enabling them to make a key leadership contribution to their chosen fields. AIU’s Bachelor's degree in Agricultural Economics goes one step further by allowing students to study and research multiple key areas of computer science to develop a unique foundation of practical knowledge and computer science theory. Your AIU Distance Learning Bachelor program in Agricultural Economics will be a custom-made program, designed just for you by you and your advisor. This flexibility to meet your needs is seldom found in other distance learning programs. Our program does not require every student to study the same subjects and use the same books and other learning materials as every other student. Instead our online Bachelor programs are designed just for you. They are individually designed to meet your needs and help you to reach your professional and personal goals.

Important:

Below is an example of the topics or areas you may develop and work on during your studies. By no means is it a complete or required list as AIU programs do not follow a standardized curriculum. It is meant solely as a reference point and example. Want to learn more about the curriculum design at AIU? Go ahead and visit our website, especially the Course and Curriculum section: http://aiu.edu/CourseCurriculum.html

Core Courses and Topics

Efficiency and Productivity Analysis
Deterministic and Stochastic
Approaches
Time Series Analysis: Applications in Agricultural and Food Economics
Theory and models for an integrated analysis of ecosystem services
Household Behavior: Theory and Applications
Topics in Industrial Organization
Risk Analysis and Risk Management in Agriculture
Agent-based Modelling in Agricultural and Resource Economics
Theory, Analysis and Empirical Study of Institutions and Organizations
Advanced Supply Chain Management
The Political Economy of Agriculture in high-income Countries
Introduction to Geographic Information

Orientation Courses

Communication & Investigation (Comprehensive Resume)
Organization Theory (Portfolio)
Experiential Learning (Autobiography)
Academic Evaluation (Questionnaire)
Fundament of Knowledge (Integration Chart)
Fundamental Principles I (Philosophy of Education)
Professional Evaluation (Self Evaluation Matrix)
Development of Graduate Study (Guarantee of an Academic Degree)

Research Project

Bachelor Thesis Project MBM300 Thesis Proposal MBM302 Bachelor Thesis (5000 words)

Contact us to get started

Submit your Online Application, paste your resume and any additional comments/ questions in the area provided.

aiu.edu/apply-online.html

Pioneer Plaza/900 Fort Street Mall 410
Honolulu, HI 96813
800-993-0066 (Toll Free in US)
808-924-9567 (Internationally)

Publication.

Each graduate is encouraged to publish their research papers either online in the public domain or through professional journals and periodicals worldwide.


About Us

Accreditation

Atlantic International University offers distance learning degree programs for adult learners at bachelors, masters, and doctoral level. With self paced program taken online, AIU lifts the obstacles that keep professional adults from completing their educational goals. Programs are available throughout a wide range of majors and areas of study. All of this with a philosophically holistic approach towards education fitting within the balance of your life and acknowledging the key role each individual can play in their community, country, and the world. Atlantic International University is accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Schools, Colleges and Universities (ASIC). ASIC Accreditation is an internationally renowned quality standard for colleges and universities. Visit ASIC’s Directory of Accredited Colleges and Universities. ASIC is a member of CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG) in the USA, an approved accreditation body by the Ministerial Department of the Home Office in the UK, and is listed in the International Directory of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). AIU meets all state and federal laws as a degree-granting institution in the United States and the State of Hawaii. The University was legally established by corporate charter in 1998 and is in good standing.

While National Accreditation is common for traditional U.S. institutions of higher learning utilizing standard teaching methods, every country has its own standards and accrediting organizations. Accreditation is a voluntary process and does not guarantee a worthy education. Rather, it means an institution has submitted its courses, programs, budget, and educational objectives for review. AIU’s Distance Learning Programs are unique, non-traditional and not accredited by the U.S. Department of Education. This may be a determining factor for those individuals interested in pursuing certain disciplines requiring State licensing, (such as law, teaching, or medicine). It is recommended that you consider the importance of National Accreditation for your specific field or profession. Although Atlantic International University’s individualized Distance Learning Degree Programs, are distinct from traditional educational institutions, we are convinced of their value and acceptance worldwide. Non-traditional programs are important because they recognize knowledge gained outside the classroom and incorporate a broader more comprehensive view of the learning experience. Many great institutions are unaccredited. We invite you to compare our programs and philosophy with traditional classroom-based programs to determine which is best suited to your needs and budget. AIU has chosen private accreditation through the Accrediting Commission International (ACI), obtained in 1999. ACI is not regulated or approved by the US Department of Education. ATLANTIC INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY IS NOT ACCREDITED BY AN ACCREDITING AGENCY RECOGNIZED BY THE UNITED

STATES SECRETARY OF EDUCATION. Note: In the U.S., many licensing authorities require accredited degrees as the basis for eligibility for licensing. In some cases, accredited colleges may not accept for transfer courses and degrees completed at unaccredited colleges, and some employers may require an accredited degree as a basis for eligibility for employment. AIU is incorporated in the state of Hawaii. As a University based in the U.S., AIU meets all state and federal laws of the United States.

There is no distinction between the programs offered through AIU and those of traditional campus based programs with regards to the following: your degree, transcript and other graduation documents from AIU follow the same standard used by all U.S. colleges and universities. AIU graduation documents can include an apostille and authentication from the U.S. Department of State to facilitate their use internationally. Authentication from the U.S. Department of State is a process that will ultimately bind a letter signed by the U.S. Secretary of State (permanently with a metal ring) to your graduation documents. If a student outside the U.S. wishes to carry out a particular procedure within a country’s Department of Education regarding their degree earned at AIU, such procedures are to be carried out independently by the student. AIU respects the unique rules and regulations of each country and does not intervene or influence the respective authorities. We recommend prospective students who intend to carry out such procedures outside the U.S. to verify in detail the steps and requirements needed in order to be fully informed.

The AIU Difference

It is acknowledged that the act of learning is endogenous, (from within), rather than exogenous.

This fact is the underlying rationale for “Distance Learning”, in all of the programs offered by AIU. The combination of the underlying principles of student “self instruction”, (with guidance), collaborative development of curriculum unique to each student, and flexibility of time and place of study, provides the ideal learning environment to satisfy individual needs.

AIU is an institution of experiential learning and nontraditional education at a distance. There are no classrooms and attendance is not required.

Mission & Vision

MISSION:

To be a higher learning institution concerned about generating cultural development alternatives likely to be sustained in order to lead to a more efficient administration of the world village and its environment; exerting human and community rights through diversity with the ultimate goal of the satisfaction and evolution of the world.

VISION:

The empowerment of the individual towards the convergence of the world through a sustainable educational design based on andragogy and omniology.

Organizational Structure

Dr. Franklin Valcin
President/Academic Dean

Ricardo González
Chief Operation Officer
Ofelia Hernandez
Director of AIU
Clara Margalef
Dir. of Special Projects of AIU
Juan Pablo Moreno
Director of Operations
Paul Applebaum
IT Director
Nadeem Awan
Chief Programing
Dr. Jack Rosenzweig
Dean of Academic Affairs
Paula Vieria
Admissions Manager
Dr. Edward Lambert
Academic Coordinator
Dr. Ariadna Romero
Academic Coordinator
Maricela Esparza
Administrative Coordinator
Jaime Rotlewicz
Admissions Coordinator
Carlos Aponte
Telecom. Coordinator
Rosie Perez
Finance Coordinator
Nadia Gabaldon
Student Services Supervisor
Dr. José Mercado
Chief Executive Officer

Linda Collazo
Student Services Coordinator
Kingsley Zelee
IT Coordinator
Felipe Gomez
Design Director
Giovanni Castillo
Operations assistant
Liliana Peñaranda
Logistics Coordinator
Amalia Aldrett
Admissions Coordinator
Alba Ochoa
Admissions Coordinator
Sandra Garcia
Admissions Coordinator
Veronica Amuz
Admissions Coordinator
Junko Shimizu
Admissions Coordinator
Roberto Aldrett
Communications Coordinator
Nazma Sultana
Assistant Programming
Jhanzaib Awan
Assistant Programming
Chris Benjamin
Hosting Server
Dr. Ricardo González
Provost

Vivian Calderon
Registrar Office
Daritza Ysla
Accounting Coordinator
Patricia C. Domenech
Human Resources
Irina Ivashuk
Administrative Assistant
Kimberly Diaz
Academic Tutor
Renata Da Silva
Academic Tutor
Lourdes Puentes
Academic Tutor
Rina Lehnhoff
Academic Tutor
Renato Cifuentes
Academic Tutor
Arturo Vejar
Academic Tutor
Arhely Espinoza
Academic Tutor
Luisa Villar
Academic Tutor
Cyndy Dominguez
Academic Tutor
Paulina Garcia
Academic Assistant

School of Business and Economics

The School of Business and Economics allows aspiring and practicing professionals, managers, and entrepreneurs in the private and public sectors to complete a self paced distance learning degree program of the highest academic standard. The ultimate goal is to empower learners and help them take advantage of the enormous array of resources from the world environment in order to eliminate the current continuum of poverty and limitations. Degree programs are designed for those students whose professional experience has been in business, marketing, administration, economics, finance and management.

Areas of Study:

Accounting, Advertising, Banking, Business Administration, Communications, Ecommerce, Finance, Foreign Affairs, Home Economics, Human Resources, International Business, International Finance, Investing, Globalization, Marketing, Management, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Public Administrations, Sustainable Development, Public Relations, Telecommunications, Tourism, Trade.

School of Social and Human Studies

The School of Social and Human Studies is focused on to the development of studies which instill a core commitment to building a society based on social and economic justice and enhancing opportunities for human well being. The founding principles lie on the basic right of education as outlined in the Declaration of Human Rights. We instill in our students a sense of confidence and self reliance in their ability to access the vast opportunities available through information channels, the world wide web, private, public, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organizations in an ever expanding global community. Degree programs are aimed towards those whose professional life has been related to social and human behavior, with the arts, or with cultural studies.

Areas of Study:

Psychology, International Affairs, Sociology, Political Sciences, Architecture, Legal Studies, Public Administration, Literature and languages, Art History, Ministry, African Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Asian Studies, European Studies, Islamic Studies, Religious Studies.

School of Science and Engineering

The School of Science and Engineering seeks to provide dynamic, integrated, and challenging degree programs designed for those whose experience is in industrial research, scientific production, engineering and the general sciences. Our system for research and education will keep us apace with the twenty-first century reach scientific advance in an environmentally and ecologically responsible manner to allow for the sustainability of the human population. We will foster among our students a demand for ethical behavior, an appreciation for diversity, an understanding of scientific investigation,

Areas of Study:

Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics, Communications, Petroleum Science, Information Technology, Telecommunications, Nutrition Science, Agricultural Science, Computer Science, Sports Science, Renewable Energy, Geology, Urban Planning.

Online Library Resources

With access to a global catalog created and maintained collectively by more than 9,000 participating institutions, AIU students have secured excellent research tools for their study programs.

The AIU online library contains over 2 billion records and over 300 million bibliographic records that are increasing day by day. The sources spanning thousands of years and virtually all forms of human expression. There are files of all kinds, from antique inscribed stones to e-books, form wax engravings to MP3s, DVDs and websites. In addition to the archives, the library AIU Online offers electronic access to more than 149,000 e-books, dozens of databases and more than 13 million full-text articles with pictures included. Being able to access 60 databases and 2393 periodicals with more than 18 million items, guarantees the information required to perform the assigned research project. Users will find that many files are enriched with artistic creations on the covers, indexes, reviews, summaries and other information. The records usually have information attached from important libraries. The user can quickly assess the relevance of the information and decide if it is the right source.

Education on the 21st century

AIU is striving to regain the significance of the concept of education, which is rooted into the Latin “educare”, meaning “to pull out”, breaking loose from the paradigm of most 21st century universities with their focus on “digging and placing information” into students’ heads rather than teaching them to think. For AIU, the generation of “clones” that some traditional universities are spreading throughout the real world is one of the most salient reasons for today’s ills. In fact, students trained at those educational institutions never feel a desire to “change the world” or the current status quo; instead, they adjust to the environment, believe everything is fine, and are proud of it all.

In a world where knowledge and mostly information expire just like milk, we must reinvent university as a whole in which each student, as the key player, is UNIQUE within an intertwined environment. This century’s university must generate new knowledge bits although this may entail its separation from both the administrative bureaucracy and the faculty that evolve there as well. AIU thinks that a university should be increasingly integrated into the “real world”, society, the economy, and the holistic human being. As such, it should concentrate on its ultimate goal, which is the student, and get him/her deeply immersed into a daily praxis of paradigm shifts, along with the Internet and research, all these being presently accessible only to a small minority of the world community. AIU students must accomplish their self-learning mission while conceptualizing it as the core of daily life values through the type of experiences that lead to a human being’s progress when information is converted into education. The entire AIU family must think of the university as a setting that values diversity and talent in a way that trains mankind not only for the present but above all for a future that calls everyday for professionals who empower themselves in academic and professional areas highly in demand in our modern society. We shall not forget that, at AIU, students are responsible for discovering their own talents and potential, which they must auto-develop in such a way that the whole finish product opens up as a flower that blossoms every year more openly.

The AIU stance is against the idea of the campus as a getaway from day-to-day pressure since we believe reality is the best potential-enhancer ever; one truly learns through thinking, brainstorming ideas, which leads to new solutions, and ultimately the rebirth of a human being fully integrated in a sustainable world environment. Self-learning is actualized more from within than a top-down vantage point, that is to say, to influence instead of requesting, ideas more than power. We need to create a society where solidarity, culture, life, not political or economic rationalism and more than techno structures, are prioritized. In short, the characteristics of AIU students and alumni remain independence, creativity, self-confidence, and ability to take risk towards new endeavors. This is about people’s worth based not on what they know but on what they do with what they know.

Read more at: www.aiu.edu

AIU Service

AIU offers educational opportunities in the USA to adults from around the world so that they can use their own potential to manage their personal, global cultural development. The foundational axis of our philosophy lies upon self-actualized knowledge and information, with no room for obsoleteness, which is embedded into a DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEM based on ANDRAGOGY and OMNIOLOGY.

The ultimate goal of this paradigm is to empower learners and help them take advantage of the enormous array of resources from the world environment in order to eliminate the current continuum of poverty and limitations.

This will become a crude reality with respect for, and practice of, human and community rights through experiences, investigations, practicum work, and/ or examinations. Everything takes place in a setting that fosters diversity; with advisors and consultants with doctorate degrees and specializations in Human Development monitor learning processes, in addition to a worldwide web of colleagues and associations, so that they can reach the satisfaction and the progress of humanity with peace and harmony.

Contact us to get started

Now, it’s possible to earn your degree in the comfort of your own home. For additional information or to see if you qualify for admissions please contact us.

Pioneer Plaza / 900 Fort Street Mall 410
Honolulu, HI 96813
800-993-0066 (Toll Free in US) [email protected]
808-924-9567 (Internationally) www.aiu.edu

Online application:

www.aiu.edu/apply3_phone.aspx