Three articles

January 18, 2018. One of our graduates, Kwasi Kyere, has January 25, 2018. One of our Academic Advisors and Atlantic published three articles in the Durreesamin Journal. Kwasi has recently completed a Doctorate program in Finance at AIU.

Read the articles in the following links: • Consolidation of Microfinance Institutions in Ghana; Needs or Challenges.
• What Supervisory Roles Should The Apex Bodies Play to Ensure The Survival of Microfinance Institutions in Ghana?
• Microfinance, Poverty Reduction and Equal Rights; Perspective from Ghana.

Text published

January 25, 2018. One of our Academic Advisors and Atlantic International University graduate, Dr. Mohammad Shahidul Islam, has published a 2-page article in the Current Trends in Biomedical Engineering & Biosciences Journal, Volume 11, Issue 1.
Read the article here: Bioester in bioscience discipline –past, present and future trends.

Book recently published

February, 2018. One of our graduates, Serge Caleb Mbula Musasa, wrote the book titled “Le Changement climatique: une sensibilisation pour une prise de conscience” about climate change, and it has been published through Edilivre. Serge Caleb Mbula Musasa completed a Doctorate program in Science with a major in Geology at Atlantic International University.

Latest News: Find his book here:

Graduated with Honors

February, 2018. These graduate students completed the majority of the requirements to obtain honors, which included a 4.0 GPA, published works, recommendation from their respective advisors, patent a product, etc. Congratulations to all of them!

Paper published

February 20,2018. One of our graduates, Saad Masood Butt, has published online the research paper “Using Community Heuristics for Crowdsourcing Platforms Interface Evaluation” in IJSER, an open access international journal. Here is an abstract: “Crowdsourcing is growing rapidly in both industry and academia, introducing new ways of conducting work and improving our understanding of how to utilize the potential of crowds. Related research has emphasized on how to improve crowdsourcing platforms and related practices to foster collaboration, motivation, trust, quality and creativity.” Saad has completed a Doctorate program in Computer Science at AIU. Read the article in the following link: https://www.ijser. org/onlineResearchPaper- Viewer.aspx?Using-Community- Heuristics-for-Crowdsourcing- Platforms-Interface- Evaluation.pdf


Thesis published

February, 2018. One of our graduates, Angel Rafael Barreiro, wrote his thesis on: “The Validation of an Integrative Health Approach for Alzheimer’s Disease” and it has been published. Angel completed a Doctorate program of Integrative Health Sciences at AIU.
You can read the thesis here: https://drive.google.com/ file/d/1FJivQD1YKwQZEE2I3-gEcJgjh1Ed7o5y/view

Appointed Professor

February 16, 2018. Professor Itamar Rogovsky, Ph.D. Summa Cum Laude and academic advisor of AIU, has been appointed professor at the Faculty of Economic Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires, in the field of Organizational Biomimetics. Professor Itamar Rogovsky has completed in Atlantic International University a Post-Doctorate program in Business Administration with honors Suma Cum Laude.

8TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON Food Studies

Call for Papers This Conference will be held 25-26 October 2018 at the University of British Columbia —Robson Square, in Vancouver, Canada. The Conference on Food Studies will feature plenary sessions by some of the world’s leading thinkers and innovators in the field. We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/ interactive sessions, posters/ exhibits, colloquia, innovation showcases, virtual posters, or virtual lightning talks. 2018 Special Focus: Digital Food Cultures. Theme 1: Food Production and Sustainability Theme 2: Food, Nutrition and Health Theme 3: Food Politics, Policies and Cultures Become a Presenter: 1. Submit a proposal 2. Review timeline 3. Register Submit your proposal by 20 March 2018 Early Registration Deadline 25 April 2018 Visit the website: food-studies.com

Latest News: www.aiu.edu/news.aspx
News Archive: aiu.edu/DownloadCenter.html



Ritasha Radhika Raj
Bachelor of Science
Nutrition Science
American Samoa
Adalberto João Francisco
Doctor of Business Management
Harbor and Port Management
Angola
Arrim T. Nunes Rodrigues Cruz da Paixão
Bachelor of Science
Environmental Science
Angola
Leonel Adrián Moresino
Bachelor of Sports Science
Sports Science
Argentina
Juan Ramón Recalde Bayon
Bachelor of Science
Mechanical Enginee ring
Argentina
Ricardo Raul Rodriguez
Master of Anthropology
Human Behavior
Argentina
           
Sona Mammadova
Bachelor of Management
Hotel Management
Azerbaijan
Steeven Gleny Apaza Hinojosa
Doctor of Business Adm inistration
Business Administration
Bolivia
Tjiliga Bolatotswe Letsholo
Bachelor of Science
Land Surveying
Botswana
Dorcas Basetsana Maripe-Perera
Doctor of Management
Disaster Management
Botswana
Siaka Millogo
Doctor of Project Management
Project Management
Burkina Faso
Edetson Justin Millo
Master of Science
Construction Management
Cameroon
           
Abed El Maati Hussein
Bachelor of Science
Computer Enginee ring
Canada
Thomas Torok
Doctor of Philosophy
Human Nutrition
Canada
Celliers van der Merwe
Bachelor of Science
Psychology
China
Juliana Uribe Valdivieso
Master of Public Health
Epidemiology
Colombia
Jose Antonio Camen Cardenas
Bachelor of Science
Project Management
Colombia
Elba Lucena Jiménez Cortés
Bachelor of Science
Education
Colombia
           
Armando Arboleda Riascos
Doctor of Science
Education
Colombia
Ariel Gil Martinez
Bachelor of Science
Automotive Enginee ring
Colombia
Muteba M.B De La Haye
Doctor of Philosophy
Coaching and Leadership
Colombia
Miguel Oscar Bolaños Gutierrez
Doctor of Management
Leadership and Talent Management
Colombia
Cristhian Felipe Osorio Ordoñez
Bachelor of Science
Electrical Enginee ring
Colombia
Jose Agustin Solano Redondo
Master of Business Adm inistration
Finance
Colombia
           
Wilson Eduardo Romero Palacios
Doctor of Business Adm inistration
Business Administration
Colombia
Hector Javier Castro Cruz
Doctor of Philosophy
Education
Colombia
Edwin Alexis Calvo Villegas
Master of Public Health
Public Health
Colombia
Cayetano Jiménez Munive
Master of Public Adm inistration
Public Management for Development
Colombia
José María Jiménez Munive
Doctor of Science
Business Administration
Colombia
Ahmed Said Mdahoma
Bachelor of Business Adm inistration
Accounting
Comoros
           
Jose Rafael De Luna Sánchez
Master of Arts
Latin American Literature
Dominican Republic
Nelson Rafael Rosario Cordero
Doctor of Philosophy
Political Science
Dominican Republic
Rosario Ynmaculada Cáceres Tejada
Doctor of Science
Clinical Psychology
Dominican Republic
Aheiry Ariel Sánchez
Bachelor of Business Adm inistration
Business Administration
Dominican Republic
Rafael Augusto Lora De Los Santos
Doctor of Philosophy
Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching
Dominican Republic
Gabriela Hidalgo García
Bachelor of Business Management
Business Management
Ecuador
           
Jesus Alberto Loor Loor
Doctor of Education
Rese arch in Higher Education
Ecuador
Carmen Verónica Bósquez García
Doctor of Science
Environmental Enginee ring
Ecuador
Héctor Antonio Vélez Andrade
Doctor of Science
Environmental Enginee ring
Ecuador
Carlos Fernando Granda Cuaycal
Bachelor of Science
Mechanical Enginee ring
Ecuador
Ximena del Rocio Bustos Zapater
Bachelor of Psychology
Psychology
Ecuador
Jéssica Herrera Salgado
Doctor of Science
Public Health
Ecuador
           
Irving Antonio Iraheta Ortiz
Bachelor of Science
Electronic Enginee ring
El Salvador
Job Antonio Ndong Esono Maye
Doctor of Science
Public Finance
Equatorial Guinea
Dfelipe Ncogo Nsue Mangue
Bachelor of Political Science
Political Science
Equatorial Guinea
Agatha Adhiambo Osiro
Master of Education
Educational Administration
Ethiopia
Grace Araba Abrahams
Bachelor of Science
Nutrition Science
Ghana
Richmond Acheampong
Doctor of Philosophy
Journalism
Ghana
           
Jose Ramiro Martinez Villatoro
Master of Business and Economics
Economics
Guatemala
Claudia Lorena Reyes Castellanos
Bachelor of Science
Biochemistry and Microbiology
Guatemala
Melagreta Pearce
Ass ociate of Comm unication
Communication
Guyana
Juan Pablo Amador Posadas
Master of Business Adm inistration
Business Administration
Honduras
Juan Ramon Castellanos Mayorquin
Bachelor of Business Adm inistration
Accounting and Audit
Honduras
Boakye Abraham
Bachelor of Science
Public Health
Italy
           
Ben Gatungu Mwangi
Bachelor of Science
Electrical Enginee ring
Kenya
Kodikaragama A. Tharindu Nalaka
Master of Business Adm inistration
Business Administration
Kuwait
Jihad Achkar
Doctor of Science
Architecture
Lebanon
Joseph Ruhamya
Bachelor of International Development
International Development
Liberia
Richard Wah Sio Sr.
Master of Public Adm inistration
Public Administration
Liberia
Binala Baziwell Ntchentche
Bachelor of Arts
Theology
Malawi
           
José Antonio Gómez Villa
Doctor of Science
Foreign Trade and Customs
Mexico
Alma Angelina Vidales Cavazos
Master of Philosophy
Philosophy
Mexico
Marco Lambertini Jiménez
Bachelor of Business Adm inistration
International Relations
Mexico
Emanuel de Jesus Neto Bomba
Bachelor of Sociology
Community Development
Mozamb ique
Rafael Luís Fernandes Benny
Doctor of Philosophy
Clinical Psychology
Mozamb ique
Dácia Alzira de Augusto Correia
Doctor of Science
Environmental Science
Mozamb ique
           
Virgilio Rommel Silva Munguía
Doctor of Business Adm inistration
Business Administration
Nicaragua
Anih Victor Chukwuemeka
Bachelor of Business Adm inistration
Business Administration
Nigeria
Nooraddin Salih Wasman Koshnaw
Doctor of Business Adm inistration
Business Management
Norway
Felix Benjamin Adrianzen Huaman
Master of Science
Transportation and Highway Enginee ring
Peru
Oscar Valerio Almiron Porroa
Bachelor of Science
Mechanical Enginee ring
Peru
Larry Sandhaus Yañez
Bachelor of Science
Industrial Enginee ring
Peru
           
Lucero Cristina E. Schmidt Alvarez
Doctor of Public Health
Public Health
Peru
Edwin Mauricio Zaga
Bachelor of Science
Civil Enginee ring
Peru
Ramiro Paucar Villa
Doctor of Public Health
Public Health
Peru
Nelson Manawag Mejia, Jr.
Doctor of Philosophy
Maritime Affairs
Philippines
Angel Rafael Barreiro
Doctor of Philosophy
Integrative Health Sciences
Puerto Rico
Abigail Cruz Garcia
Doctor of Science
Neuropsychology
Puerto Rico
           
Patrick Ujwiga Anguru
Doctor of Philosophy
Education
Rwanda
Luís Cassandra Pires dos Santos
Doctor of Philosophy
Business Admin. and Strategic Planning
Säo Tomé and Príncipe
Thomas Bernard Aruna
Bachelor of Science
Logistics
Sierra Leone
Mildred Patricia Dors
Master of Science
Business Management
Suriname
Jill Vanessa U Kasanwidjojo
Bachelor of Science
Environmental Sci
Sentumbwe Nakkazi Damalie
Doctor of Education
Economics and Education
Uganda
           
Martin Muhire
Master of Public Health
Public Health
Uganda
Engoku Bernard Nicholas
Bachelor of Public Adm inistration
Public Administration and Management
Uganda
Nadiia Butler
Bachelor of Sports Science
Sports Science Management
UAE
Augusto Muca Valentim
Master of Science
Computer Science
United Kingdom
Maria Magdalena Lorenzo Rio
Doctor of Education
Curriculum Des ign
USA
Nicole Wilhelmina Lockward Mendez
Bachelor of Science
Nutrition and Dietetics
USA
           
Kengue Ndjile Marcelo
Bachelor of Science
Information Systems
USA
Josephine Ocran
Master of Business Adm inistration
Human Res ource Management
USA
Kalu Chika Imaga
Bachelor of Science
Instrumentation Enginee ring
USA
Jose Ignacio Diaz Rettali
Doctor of Philosophy
Finance and Economy
USA
Allan Alberto Canales Almendares
Ass ociate of Science
Electrical Enginee ring
USA
Banda Aaron
Doctor of Philosophy
Health Science Education
Zamb ia

Find More Graduates

Gallery: aiu.edu/Graduation/grids/currentgallery.html
Interviews: www.aiu.edu/Graduation/grids/interviews.html
This month we have graduates from: American Samoa · Angola · Argent ina· Azerbaijan · Bolivia · Botswana · Burkina Faso · Cameroon · Canada · China · Colombia · Comoros · Dominican Republic · Ecuador · El Salva dor · Equato rial Guinea · Ethiopia · Ghana · Guatemala · Guyana · Honduras · Italy · Kenya · Kuwait · Lebanon · Liberia · Malawi · Mexico · Mozambique · Nicaragua · Nigeria · Norway · Peru · Philipinnes · Puer to Rico · Rwanda · Säo Tomé and Príncipe · Sierra Leone · Suriname · Uganda · UAE · United Kingdom · USA · Zambia

Student Testimonials

Prince I. Williams
Bachelor of Sociology
January 16, 2018

“My experience studying Sociology at AIU was valuable. My expectation for this course is to gain the knowledge that I need and apply it to the work I’m already doing in the field of research, Monitoring and Evaluation and or as Social worker. Sociology makes me to understand the basics of social life and focuses on the interaction between human groups and institutions and their influence on each other. Humans are diversified, and so we must learn to coexist in a peaceful environment. AIU on-line degree program gives me the flexibility to take courses and complete the work on my schedule. I have a very busy schedule and it is hard to commit to being in class on a specified date and time. AIU makes it possible for me to earn a degree in the comfort of my home and still have time for family, work and myself. I do think that AIU is more suitable for the working adult learner. My tutor and advisors, for example Edward Lambert, has been very helpful and responsive to all my concerns. ...
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Christopher Licata
Bachelor of Facilities Engineering
Management January 22, 2018

“My experience at AIU was nothing short of a worldclass education. I have researched numerous educational institutions with hopes of finding a learning model that is both efficient and highly effective; AIU was the clear choice, providing higher-education though a modern andragogical approach. As a middle-aged professional already working in the Facilities Engineering field, it was critical to me to have the opportunity to custom tailor a curriculum that is aligned with the latest, most advanced methods, and cutting-edge technologies. All too often, degree programs are centered around textbooks that were published decades ago; only with subtle annual revisions made to keep them “current.” At AIU, I had unlimited access to their enormous online library, scholarly search engines, as well an open invitation to participate in optional courses outside my curriculum, at no additional expense. At AIU, I was surrounded, virtually...
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Dacia Alzira de Augusto Correia
Doctor of Environmental Science
January 30, 2018

“A pleasant and encouraging education surprise: In few words this is how I can characterize my experience at AIU. I am a University lecturer and until I got registered at AIU I had never got in touch with the Andragogic system of study; coming from a classic way of education and having to be almost 100 percent in charge of my education process it was really something very challenging and very good. Preparing the assignments of Phase 1 made me go back and look careful to who I am in an integrated approach (academic/social/culture/professional, etc.) and it was something very motivating and I realized that I have been through a lot and have learned a lot all over the way: in short I can say that I discovered a new Dacia with huge social and professional potential that need to be explored further more. I am really grateful to AIU, because beyond the Doctorate degree it valued all my previous knowledge which is very rewarding for anyone. Last, I can say that AIU is giving me one more...
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Samuel Sule Ajanson
Bachelor of Public Health
February 7, 2018

“Have you ever been at sea in a dense fog, when it seemed as if a tangible white darkness shut you in and the great ship, tense and anxious, groped her way toward the shore with plummet and sounding-line, and you waited with beating heart for something to happen? I was like that ship before my education began, only I was without compass or sounding line, and no way of knowing how near the harbor was. “Light! Give me light!” was the wordless cry of my soul, and the light of love shone on me in that very hour.” My journey with AIU started almost three (3) years ago but due to financial constraints I could not accomplish my desired aim until finally I got the strength and I said to myself that I must peruse my dream of schooling at AIU. Indeed, I have done a lot of courses online but AIU is unique in every aspect, and ever ready to attend to me without any delay, AIU has given all that I need in life and taught me how to be independent and it has helped me a lot. ...
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Find more testimonials from AIU s tudents here: www.aiu.edu/Testimonials.aspx


Global security: the number one dilemma of the world community

Abstract | Jean Cédric Obame Emane | Doctorate’s degree in International Relations



This paper is an attempt to deconstruct the concept of security which has been by tradition exclusively confined to the military realm. We make evident that security takes into consideration a number of fields and that its major concern is the human person. In addressing security in this work, we do not only refer to the security of states –the concept of national security–, but also to that of individuals –human security–. Governments should integrate in their security agendas not only their own security, but also the security of their nationals. Accordingly, this implies that they should protect their citizens against any threat to human life. In other words, governments or the people they rule do not merely face military threats from other states; they are as well endangered by other threats to their security, these threats are debated in this research paper. We do not mean that military issues are not to be conceptualized within security frameworks, but we do contend that they are not the unique issues to be securitized. Indeed, this paper displays that other issues should be securitized. Global security is the process that consists of preventing the break-out of military conflicts –with preventive diplomacy–, the mitigation of non-state military violence; it is focused on environmental degradation, arms control issues etc. in order to safeguard global peace and human security. Global security is put in place through diplomatic resolutions, peaceful settlements of armed conflicts, or by sending peacekeeping forces to areas stifled with military conflicts, or even by protecting people against environmental threats. Global security has also something to do with the respect of human rights everywhere in the world and as well the promotion and proliferation of democracy as a political system that guarantees the individual rights of citizens. Another aspect of global security is the global-regional security mechanism between the UN Security Council and regional and sub-regional organizations.

A new understanding of the concept of security has been developing in the 21st century (Nanda, 2009). He contends that the need to redefine the traditional concept of security was eloquently developed in 2003 by the Commission on Human Security, in their report Human Security Now (Nanda, 2009). The writer explains that the Commission co-chaired by Sadako Ogato, former UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and Amartya Sen, Nobel laureate in economics, was launched by the former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan at the 2000 Millennium Summit and was recognized as the initiative of the Japanese government. The new concept of security was different from the traditional one in that it aimed at assuring the security of people. According to Nanda (2000, p.335) the Commission indicated the following: “The security debate has changed dramatically since the inception of state security advocated in the 17th century. According to that traditional idea, the state would monopolize the rights and means to protect its citizens. But in the 21st century, both the challenges to security and its protectors have become more complex. The state remains the fundamental purveyor. Yet it often fails to fulfill its security obligations—and at times has even become a source of threat to its own people. That is why attention must now shift from the security of the state to the security of the people —to human security.” The Commission’s emphasis is on the enablement of people, which can help get them ready against severe present and future dangers, both societal and natural. The Commission sustains that the traditional view of state security has expanded in the 21st century to also encompass human security (Nanda, 2009). The emphasis on human security is to make sure that adequate focus is directed to address the real causes of insecurity from several individuals around the world who suffer. Nuclear weapons represent a serious cause of people’s insecurity, and weapons of mass destruction (WMD) –chemical, biological and nuclear– are apparently among the main dangers to state security (Nanda, 2009). The possession of nuclear weapons has basically three goals: (1) deterrence of intended nuclear attack; (2) deterrence of most important conventional war; and (3) compensation for possible inadequacies in nonnuclear forces, including deterrence or response to attacks with chemical or biological weapons (Watkinson, 1999).

Neither China nor Russia would currently consider reducing their nuclear weapons, while they would like the United States to do it (Watkinson, 1999). Accordingly, the author believed that it would be wiser for the United States to keep up a strong military deterrent. An example can be provided, when the Iraqi government in the Gulf War attributed their decision not to use bioweapons and chemical agents against the United States for the reason that they knew they could undergo a nuclear counter-attack by the USA (Watkinson, 1999). According to the author’s views, it seems to us that possessing nuclear technology if not nuclear weapons is overwhelmingly crucial in this new context of international affairs. The acquisition of nuclear arsenals seems to be significantly important for the reasons of deterrence because a state can decide to attack another state when it knows that it cannot fear any threatening reprisals. Today possessing nuclear weapons is somewhat a certain guarantee of security not to attack but to retaliate. Therefore, it might be argued that conventional weapons are good but not enough to ensure some total protection if an attack is carried out. However, it is not documented that a nuclearweapon state (NWS) ever used preemptive measures against a non-nuclear weapon-states (NNWS). In other words, a nuclear war has never been waged; this is why states are making efforts to avoid such a disaster because as Gorbarchev said in 1988, a nuclear war would have no winner, nor looser, it will have as only outcome the annihilation of mankind (Ó Tuathail et al., 1998, p.98). In the meantime, states with nuclear arsenals know that it would be a mistake to eliminate all their nuclear weapons. The point at this stage is to have dominant nuclear deterrent to dissuade other states to attack them as in the above mentioned case of the United States. For example, North Korea has a nuclear arsenal but is aware that if it ever launches a nuclear warhead to the United States, it will witness a tremendous military response from America. In addition, deterrence is a good strategy to ensure that a nuclear war is unlikely to wage.

Rinn (2013) contends that there are several issues that influence the decision of a state to develop nuclear weapons, but generally speaking, today there are basically two types of nuclear-weapon states: global political actors and issue-specific possessors, that is, the five NPT nuclearweapon states (NWS) and those owning nuclear weapons and are not parties to the NPT (Non-Proliferation Treaty on Nuclear Disarmament). (See Table 1) By tradition, the questions of global security have basically been centered on the military and national security issues. This means that governments based their security agendas on the protection of their territory in ensuring the integrity of their land, the protection of civilians against any foreign military aggression. What we mean is that dealing with international security is huge and that traditionally, dealing with it would be about the military and issues related to territorial integrity (military viability), the ability for states to ensure one’s sovereignty. However, we come to discover that any single threat to human life represents a problem of security. We think about water scarcity that is becoming gradually serious. We have to mention as well the problem of population pressures that is a threat as more people on the planet will pose a problem to agriculture, which might result in food scarcity. Accordingly, we cannot solve problems of global security –climate change, environmental threat, terrorism, peace building etc.– with isolationism because of the so-called national security interests. A good example on that matter has been COP 21 on global warming, a climate change conference held in Paris between November and December 2015. Buzan (1991) talked about the five sectors defining security, which are political, military, economic, societal and environmental. As Buzan pointed out, these five fields of security do not work in isolation from one another. Each addresses a specific domain comprised within a security problématique, but all of them are intertwined together with a strong connection. We come to the realization that security is not just about military issues, but also comprises other fields like economic security, environmental security, health security, food security, community security, political security and physical security (Bosold and Werthes, 2005).

Terrorism is also a mounting issue in international affairs and an aspect of security that requires military attention as two basic doctrines to fight terrorism are usually considered: counterterrorism and terrorism preemption. There are also other approaches such as appeasement, but no matter the doctrine that we choose to address the issue of terrorism, we need a deep involvement of the military, to some extent, the police. A number of possibilities are explored to combat terrorism in the United States: they can stress the significance of law enforcement function, the crucial role of the intelligence community, the employment of diplomacy or the prerequisite to engage in military actions against nonstate violence and the sponsors of terrorist groups abroad (Sloan, 2000). The reluctance to employ the military option to reactive missions, much less in preemptive actions, is the combination of an essential omission in enhancing an important capability to attack terrorists abroad (Sloan, 2000). The writer pointed out the following question: is terrorism an act of war or an act of criminality? The answer to this question will determine the doctrine that will be developed to address it (Sloan, 2000). To deal with global security has brought us to consider peace and conflict resolution. What is peace? For the common people peace is the absence of warfare, or violent conflict. This definitional approach to peace is not bad, but is limited. In effect, the concept of peace goes beyond that common perception. Peace can also be considered as the absence of every forms of violence. These categorizations of peace have a label in international relations (IR): negative and positive peace. These terms were first coined by Galtung, in the Editorial to the primary edition of the Journal of Peace Research in the year 1964, (Grewal, 2003). The history associated with the distinction between positive and negative peace stems from the 1950s wherein peace research was too deeply dedicated towards direct violence, such as warfare and assault and was dominated by North Americans. The Peace Research Institute of Oslo and the Journal of Peace Research were a source of fresh understanding in peace theory (Grewal, 2003).

Galtung’s chief argument is that an adequate understanding of violence is a prerequisite in order to understand and define peace. Peace is not simply an absence of immediate violence (negative peace) but as well absence of structural violence (positive peace). Structural violence originates from violence in the structure of society, rather than direct violence, that is generated by coercion (Grewal, 2003). In this perspective, to discuss peace journalism and peace education brings us to consider along with Galtung that to argue something about peace journalism, something has to be argued about peace. To argue something about peace, something has to be argued about conflict and its resolution. To argue about conflict resolution, something has to be argued about the United States’ profound participation in numerous international conflicts (Galtung, 2015).

Conflict resolution is a major field in IR as the world has turned out to be drowned in a range of conflicts which constitutes a significant challenge for the world community. Now, what is international conflict resolution? Wanis-St. John and Ghais (2014) define international conflict resolution as that body of knowledge, practices, rules and organizations that strive to prevent, reduce and transform potential or actual violent conflict within and between states. In short, we contend that global security is the major dilemma of the world community. A number of challenges are faced by the world community in actuality; we debate these challenges. We discuss five main fields of security: (I) Armament and Disarmament, (II) Environmental Security, (III) Global and Regional Security, (IV) Military Strategies and Terrorism, and (V) Peace and Conflict Resolution.

REFERENCES.
Bosold, D. and Werthes, S. (2005). Human Security in Practice: Canadian and Japanese Experiences. Internationale Politik und Gesellschaft, retrieved from: www.library.fes.de. | Buzan, B. (1991).”New Patterns of Global Security in the Twenty-first Century”. International Affairs, 67.3, p. 432-433. | Galtung, J. (2015). “Peace Journalism and Reporting on the United States”. The Brown Journal of World Affairs, Vol. 22 (1), p. 321-332. | Grewal, B.S. (2003). “Johan Galtung: Positive and Negative Peace”. Retrieved from: www.activeforpeace.org. | Nanda, V.P. (2009). “Nuclear Weapons, Human Security, and International Law”. Denver Journal of International Law Policy Vol. 37 No3, p.331-350. | Ó Tuathail, G., Dalby, S. & Routledge, P. (1998). The Geopolitics Reader. London and New York: Routledge. | Rinn, A.S. (2013). “A Behavioral Economic Approach to Nuclear Disarmament Advocacy”. Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law [VOL 46: p. 969-1002]. | Sloan, S. (2000). Beating International Terrorism: An Action Strategy for Preemption and Punishment. Alabama: Revise Edition, Air University Press, Maxwell Air Force Base. | Wanis-St. John, A. and Ghais, S. (2014). The Handbook of Conflict Resolution. Washington, D.C.: American University. | Watkinson, K. (1999). The Post-Cold War Era and the Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy. Retrieved from: http:// web.stanford.edu/class/e297c/war_peace/atomic/hnuclear.html.

Study Tips How to write essays more easily

Edward Lambert | AIU Academic Coordinator


There are times when a student has a hard time writing an essay, because the ideas just do not flow from the mind. The student does not know what to write. So what can a student do to fill the mind with lots of ideas to write about?

It is important to realize first that the mind processes what we study at night, while we are sleeping. So it is very helpful to study every day, even if it is 10 minutes. When we study every day, the mind is making many more connections between what we study and the life we live. Therefore, it is much easier to talk and write about what we study because it is more a part of our life. There are 3 simple things that help a student to easily write essays.... 1 Study at least 10 minutes per day. It is like giving little snacks of knowledge to your mind. Then, it will be easier to write the assignments because your mind assimilates and develops new ideas at night, when you are sleeping.

2 Talk about what you are studying with another person, you can talk with a friend, a relative, a neighbor, or even a person in a store. The moment you try to explain what you are studying; your mind is stimulated to produce and organize thoughts and ideas. All of a sudden, your mind will have the ideas ready to write in your essay. Then you can write your essay faster. So whenever you get stuck and do not know what to write, the simplest and best solution is to talk with someone about what you are trying to write about.

3 One easy way to study at least 10 minutes per day is to watch videos on the internet about your course, like from Youtube.com. Videos are a great way to keep your mind active on the study material. You can watch one 10-minute video each day related to your field of study. You can prepare assignments based on videos too. Keep studying every day and try to explain what you are studying to another person. You will find essays easier to write, because your mind is continually organizing the ideas.

Assessment criteria

By Dr. Rosa Hilda Lora M. Advisor at AIU | [email protected]


When we talk about evaluation, the moments when we were able to obtain the recognition of what we were doing come to our mind. We also think about the less fortunate moments and we get all the reflections of what was good and what shouldn’t be from the school system, to who was good teacher or our mistakes.

The evaluation is still a difficult dish to digest because it always involves the unknown, it is always the search in our thinking for a response that may not be well structured and we must be able to answer what is part of knowledge or what is part of our know about experiences. We always ask ourselves when we have to do to study something: why the evaluation must be anguish of the unforeseen. The answer is something is malfunctioning because it must be an experience like the education system in Finland. In Finland, recognized for its excellent results in education, it happens that the student chooses the subjects when he feels he has the skills to carry out that learning. In the vast majority of countries, the Curriculum is designed so that these or those subjects are taken now; the student can choose certain optional subjects but not the base curriculum. In the twentieth century we already had two schools of thought regarding teaching learning: Behaviorism and Constructivism. Behaviorism is based on the measurement of what the student should know; it focuses on testing and is represented by Educational Technology. Constructivism considers that the student for all learning has prior knowledge that must relate and that education is a function achieved by socialization. Education must be to insert the individual into a society and for him to solve problems of that society or provide solutions to a good coexistence.

Educational technology allowed the massive education that was necessary at a time in our history when the two great wars ended: the First and Second World War to enter the production to all those who had the fortune to return. Nowadays the society is different but there are many who find it easier to evaluate items that to analyze or to structure documents and more still to analyze what the document says because they have to see if the student has a series of skills or not and still more how they’ll achieve them. Regarding Educational Technology says the work of Anijovich: “It is distressing to know that thousands of children and young people have, in the 21st century, their learning legitimated by numerical data, by arithmetic averages, by statistics, and that this is considered (naively) a precise and fair evaluation”. Anijovich and others (2010, p. 78). The traditional beliefs of evaluation where it is regarded as an instrument of information and control, giving great importance to correct and simple answer, have to end. The student knows in the society in which we live that this form of evaluation is not fair but he has no choice but to accept it or he will not do what he wants. Nowadays is considered as the literate, mathematical, scientific, technological and visual domain is a strange mixture an evaluation of questions and short answers or repetition of scientific texts. Knowledge is something more: “...when the new learning of the students is based on previous learning and a network is established that contains the new learning and what they already knew, and between them they enrich each other, when what is taught and learned is interesting and challenging, and when these lessons are perceived as affordable...” Anijovich and others (2010, p.40). Also in the evaluation we have to consider the abilities of each human being, it can’t be the same for all and consider it fair: “...each student, interactively, discovers the world in its own way, different and unique. But he apprehends the world in a richer and more challenging way, with the greater socialization, and the cooperation of the adults who are mediators in his knowledge”. Anijovich and others (2010, p. 78). Piaget and Vygotsky consider the educator as a mediator in the construction of knowledge and emphasize the importance of reciprocal trust between educator and pupil. The graph presented on this page is significant because this is the case with education in many schools, universities and training centers. Here is exemplified with animals but reality overcomes this fiction.

Then there is talk of school failure and governments are doing wonders for students to achieve degrees instead of enriching the education system with what has always been they Achilles heel: the evaluation. For there to be an evaluation that corresponds to the human beings that we are nowadays and to the society that we need to have, we must reform education in terms of the training of teachers and professionals who teach. School failure has many factors that make it up: the economic and social context; the family as a socio-cultural level in terms of dedication and expectations; the educational system and the student in terms of their interest, skills and participation. In Constructivism it is considered that the teacher or professional who exercises as a teacher, the teacher is the companion of the learner, so the evaluation is mediation. In the mediating evaluation the student must receive feedback. When we talk about feedback, we must consider the way to do it: in which way to indicate to the student what should be improved. In schools or educational centers such as universities there is a difference when education is face-to-face or online. In face-to-face relations there is a face-to-face relationship, but in the virtual one, a photo, a telephone does not transmit non-verbal language.

In all education as mediation we must consider that the other person is a human being who deserves respect for what the feedback should consider that aspect. The form of adequate feedback is to say to the student he did this and this is fine but here we can improve it in this way. At Atlantic International University (AIU) we have adult students who may have a long time of not being studying. What happens with mediation? We must consider: 1. The time of accommodation of learning according to Piaget and its socialization in the new society, according to Vygotsky. 2. Current knowledge becomes obsolete every 5 years. 3. The student has to learn the digital language in which he is not literate. Given these factors that occurs in all adults mediation has to consider the emotional aspect a lot. In the mediating evaluation we have the competences, a concept that has received different meanings. We will take the concept as a holistic relationship; here the general attributes such as knowledge, attitudes, values and abilities are united; all attached to the context.

The other forms of competence are: the ability to act in front of a type of situation and as a list of tasks. The training of competences involves a change in the relationship of teachers with knowledge, in their way in the Chair, their identity and their own professional skills. To create a system of evaluation that is competences as a holistic relationship, it is necessary to adopt a flexible form in terms of programming, to privilege the solution of problems and to expand the resources and teachinglearning materials. The skills to consider in a mediating evaluation for holistic competences are the following: 1. Presentation of the work whatever it may be. 2. Scientific concepts handled. 3. Problem presented. 4. Application or solution to some problem. 5. Use of presentation techniques. (There are 5 techniques to present works in science) 6. The use of quotations because the works may not be intentional copies. The student didn’t learn the value of the work of others. Student may not have competencies in terms of presenting papers because he is focused on a banking education, which was what he was given as a skill.

It will cost him to change the type of thought to draw inferences so his accommodation in that aspect is slower, what you would have to see is other skills he probably has. It is convenient to ask him what he likes to do in order to discover his skills and thus increase his self-esteem; remember that he doesn’t have the scaffolding that Vygotsky talks about because he is not together with his peers. All aspects of education, nowadays, can be resolved; the problem of evaluation is dragging on education because it is very difficult for us to learn from Finland and we would need a lot of economic resources for each student to study the subjects when he has the right competences. The online universities solve the problem that we mentioned because we can tell the student you can send this work now or you can send it when you see fit. The open Curriculum of AIU allows a mediating and competency evaluation. Go ahead discover your competitions! Go ahead don’t leave your studies!

BIBLIOGRAPHY. Anijovich, Rebeca y otros (2010). La Evaluación Significativa, Argentina: Paidós. | Ausubel, D. y Joseph Novak (2009). Psicología Educativa, México: Trillas. | Díaz Barriga Arceo, F. y Geraldo Hernández Rojas (2010). Estrategias docentes para un aprendizaje significativo, una interpretación constructivista, México: Trillas.




Learning

New kind of school

Will prioritize happiness and emotional intelligence.

You won’t find the students at Riverbend School near Chennai, India in a traditional classroom —they might be in an ideation laboratory or a meditation room. The school is planning to focus on personal happiness, and turning out children who will give back to the world in a positive way. Designed by architecture studio Kurani, the campus of the Riverbend School was inspired by villages —where, according to anthropologists, personal relationships are strongest. Riverbend School will be a 400-student weekday boarding school dedicated to teaching happiness. The school’s founders, entrepreneurs at SPI Incubator, believe great achievements and lives are built on a foundation of emotional intelligence and personal happiness —which they think are overlooked in traditional education. So they’re starting a school for middle and high school students that will prioritize those ideals. Kurani took the question: “How can architecture foster happiness?” as a launching point, and found in the longest study on happiness in the world that “real happiness comes from our relationships.” And as relationships are strong in villages, they modeled the layout of the campus after a village. “The school centers around a public plaza with spaces for studying, playing, reflecting, living, and farming.
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Musical Instruments made of ice

Learn how to tell tales everyone will love.

While most musicians rely on roadies to tune their instruments, musicians at the Ice Music Festival work with a team of ice carvers to prep their gear. Located in Finse, Norway, the annual event is the only one in the world dedicated to the art of making music using instruments constructed out of ice. But not just any ice will do. For this year’s festival, ice carvers have selected the frozen waters of Lake Finse, located just south of the village, as well as a nearby glacier, as their materials of choice. Armed with chainsaws, chisels and hammers, they’re tasked with the finger-numbing process of fashioning blocks of ice into guitars, woodwinds, keyboard and drums — even the stage is carved out of ice. To ensure that there is enough ice to work with, the festival has been moved to Finse, located about 30 miles from Geilo, where the event debuted in 2005. Over the years the temperature in Geilo has become abnormally warm, making it a challenge for the stage and instruments to stay frozen.
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Odderon, a peculiar quasiparticle

This is the first evidence of its existence.

Particle physicists at CERN have caught the first glimpse of a long-sought-after quasiparticle, which they’ve been hunting since the 1970s. The curious state, called an odderon, is made up of an odd number of gluons, the carriers of a strong nuclear force. This force keeps protons and neutrons together and “glues” the quarks that these particles are composed of together. Protons are smashed into one another in the Large Hadron Collider and peculiar states of matter like quark-gluon plasma can form. The atom smasher can also create bound states, which are the so-called quasiparticles, peculiar objects that are not particles but behave like them nonetheless. Pairs of gluons have been seen forming bound states, but scientists have never seen this happen for an odd number of gluons. However, the latest measurements suggest that this is possible. The findings are submitted for publication and can be read on the CERN preprint server in two papers. “Until now, most models were thinking there was a pair of gluons –always an even number,” team member Professor Christophe Royon, from the University of Kansas, said in a statement. “Now we measure for the first time the higher number of events and properties and at a new energy. We found measurements that are incompatible with this traditional model of assuming an even number of gluons.” ...
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Single atom photographed

Now you can see it with the naked eye.

Oxford University physicist David Nadlinger has won the top prize in the fifth annual Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council’s (EPSRC) national science photography competition for his image ‘Single Atom in an Ion Trap’, which does something incredible: makes a single atom visible to the human eye. Captured on an ordinary digital camera, the image shows an atom of strontium suspended by electric fields emanating from the metal electrodes of an ion trap —those electrodes are about 2mm apart. Nadlinger shot the photo through the window of the ultra-high vacuum chamber that houses the ion trap, which is used to explore the potential of laser-cooled atomic ions in new applications such as highly accurate atomic clocks and sensors, and quantum computing. Strontium is a soft, silvery metal that burns in air and reacts with water. It’s best known for giving fireworks and flares their brilliant red glow, and for being one of the key ingredients in ‘glowin- the-dark’ paints and plastics, as it can absorb light and re-emit it slowly. In the photo caption, Nadlinger explains: “When illuminated by a laser of the right blue-violet color, the atom absorbs and re-emits light particles sufficiently quickly for an ordinary camera to capture it in a long exposure photograph.” ...
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Nora Fok

Ethereal hand-knit jewelry inspired by nature and science. Source: www.thisiscolossal.com

Fok, who is based in southeast England, works in her home studio creating all of her pieces manually, using hand tools, fine nylon microfilament and basic processes like weaving, knitting, braiding, and knotting.
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Babies get strokes, too

Here’s how their brains recover.

Strokes are common in old age, but these devastating events also strike babies. That’s likely because birth is stressful and particularly hard on the body’s blood vessels and circulation. But unlike adults, babies who suffer a stroke in the area of the brain that deals with language retain the ability to communicate. In new work presented at the annual meeting of AAAS, which publishes Science, researchers found that as teenagers, individuals who experienced strokes around the time of birth are able to understand language as well as their healthy siblings. To find out how adults who had strokes as infants compensated for such severe brain damage, the team imaged their brains while they listened to sentences read forward and backward. In healthy adults, the test causes language processing areas on the left side of the brain to light up with activity (pictured above on the left). In the stroke survivors, who had lost brain tissue in this region, the activity had shifted to an area in the right hemisphere that’s the mirror image of the normal language region (above, right). This right hemisphere region is almost never used for understanding language in healthy people, and adults who have had a stroke do not enlist it for speech processing. The researchers suspect that the infants benefit from a unique window during development when the brain is flexible enough...
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Oxytocin, the love hormone

We have some advice to self-generate.

Until a few years ago, oxytocin was believed to only be generated during sex and during childbirth, since at these moments the discharge of the hormone is extremely powerful. We now know that the hormone can be produced in more subtle ways during activities that promote social bonds. The importance of generating oxytocin should not be forgotten. The happiest moments in life are usually flooded with oxytocin and in their repetition they consolidate a healthy life. Oxytocin has been shown to reduce the effect of cortisol in several research studies, the so called “stress hormone”. We know that nowadays, stress is our health’s sworn enemy. Likewise, oxytocin helps us rid ourselves of fear, regulating the amygdala’s actions. Additionally to reducing stress, this allows us to have better socialisation and according to Harvard’s Grant study, intimate relations are the most important factor that will lead to a long and well-lived life. Hugs, caresses and kissing are the most efficient ways to produce oxytocin. Playing with our children, sealing deals with a business partner, playing team sports among other activities in which intimate moments are shared also encourage the production of this neuropeptide.
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Peru creates national park

This protects one of the world’s last great intact forest.



The remote rain forests in Peru’s northeast corner are vast —so vast that the clouds that form above them can influence rainfall in the western United States. The region contains species, especially unusual fish, that are unlike any found elsewhere on Earth. Scientists studying the area’s fauna and flora may gain insights into evolutionary processes and into the ecological health and geological history of the Amazon. Now the area has become home to one of the Western Hemisphere’s newest national parks. Yaguas National Park will protect millions of acres of roadless wilderness —and the indigenous people who rely on it— from development and deforestation. “This is a place where the forest stretches to the horizon,” said Corine Vriesendorp, a conservation ecologist at The Field Museum in Chicago, one of many organizations that worked to win the national park designation, Peru’s highest level of protection. Peru’s new park joins a network of parks and reserves recently created to preserve territory in South American countries, including Ecuador, Chile and Colombia. “Nowadays we’re trying to think big,” said Avecita Chicchón, who leads the Andes-Amazon Initiative, part of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. “You need these large areas to be connected.” Read full text:

8 things you can compost

There’s a lot that can go into a compost bin.



1 Sawdust. As long as the sawdust is free from chemicals, dry material is actually good for your compost. Try to keep a 4:1 ratio of brown (dry) to green (food scraps) material. 2 Egg cartons. Hopefully you’re reusing your egg cartons, but even the most diligent upcycler can get stuck with a few too many. 3 Shredded paper. Looking for a use for all your junk mail? Shred and compost away. 4 Wine. Had a bottle that sat open for too long? If it doesn’t taste good anymore, you don’t have to pour the wine down the sink —you can add it to your compost instead. 5 Toothpicks. It’s easy to toss them in the trash, but you don’t have to. 6 Natural sponges. Sponges from the sea are biodegradable, so once the sponge has run its course, make sure to compost it. 7 Cat and dog hair. If you have an animal, chances are you have some fur that has accumulated in corners. Pop it in the compost to get rid of it. 8 Business cards. As long as they are made of paper, and not the glossy kind, you can put them into the compost bin. Read full text:

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Robotic exoskeletons

Could save disabled children from a life in wheelchairs.

A few years ago, Manmeet Maggu and Trexo Robotics co-founder Rahul Udasi were still undergraduates at the University of Waterloo. That’s when they found out Maggu’s nephew had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy –and that he might never be able to walk as a result. Building robots was already something of an interest they shared. The diagnosis caused them to look around at the robotics market and decide – they ought to build something to help. “When we started looking around, we realized the tremendous negative health effects of being in a wheelchair, especially for a child that’s going to spend their entire life in the wheelchair,” Maggu told BGR. “For us it was something –we started looking for ways to get (his nephew) out of the wheelchair, and pretty soon we realized today there’s no solution out there. There’s no exoskeleton or robotic solution that can help a child get out of the wheelchair and be walking around. That was when we decided to use our robotic experience and background to really build something for him.” It started off as a project, a kind of side hustle, before getting formalized into what would become Trexo, a Toronto- based startup. The company was launched in 2016, and it’s been moving forward incrementally since then.
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Birth of wolf cubs in Mexico

Raises hopes for endangered species.

Mexican zoo officials are drooling over the birth of seven cubs of a species of endangered wolf. They were born in April, 2017, to a female named Pearl, who was nice and plump and ended up delighting vets with a surprisingly large litter. “We were expecting four or five,” Arturo Gayosso, director of the Zoologico los Coyotes in Mexico City, told AFP last July. These are known as Mexican wolves (Canis lupus baileyi), a small, rare and genetically distinct subspecies of the gray wolf. Their realm used to be the southwestern US and central and northern Mexico. But the wolves’ numbers started to dwindle at the start of the 20th century as populations of their native prey, such as deer and elk, declined and the canines turned to cattle for food and ranchers began to kill them off , according to the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Since roughly the mid-1900s, Mexican wolves have been listed an endangered species in both countries. The hope is that these seven babies —five males and two females— will be healthy enough to eventually be released into the wild to help create more wolves. Their father Yoltic was born in the same zoo. His name is a Nahautl language word that means “he who lives.” Pearl was moved to Zoologico los Coyotes in December and hit it off right away with Yoltic, playing and running with him. “That told us they would be good mates,” said Gayosso.
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Campus

Harvard negotiation

Harvard’s Program on Negotiation has created a 32- step checklist to prepare for negotiations of any type, be they in business, or your personal life.

1: What do I want from this negotiation? List shortterm and long-term goals, and dreams related to the negotiation.
2: What are my strengths (values, skills, and assets)in this negotiation?
3: What are my weaknesses and vulnerabilities in this negotiation?
4: Why is the other party negotiating with me? What do I have that they need?
5: What lessons can I apply from past negotiations to improve my performance?
6: Where and when should the negotiation take place?
7:How long should talks last? What deadlines are we facing?
8: What are my interests in the upcoming negotiation? How do they rank in importance?
9: What is my best alternative to a negotiated agreement, or BATNA? That is, what option would I turn to if I’m not satisfied with the deal we negotiate or if we reach an impasse? How can I strengthen my BATNA?
10 What is my reservation point —my indifference point between a deal and no deal?
11: What is my aspiration point in the negotiation —the ambitious, but not outrageous, goal that I’d like to reach?
12: What are the other side’s interests? How important might each issue be to them?
13: What do I think their reservation point and BATNA may be? How can I find out more?
14: What does their BATNA mean in terms of their willingness to do a deal with me? Who has more power to walk away?
1:5 Is there a zone of possible agreement (ZOPA) between my reservation point and the other side’s?
16: What is my relationship history with the other party? How might our past relationship affect current talks?
17: Are there cultural differences that we should prepare for?
18: To what degree will we be negotiating electronically? Are we prepared for the pros and cons of negotiating via email, teleconference?
19: In what order should I approach various parties on the other side?
20: What is the hierarchy within the other side’s team? What are the patterns of influence and potential tensions? How might these internal dynamics affect talks?
21 What potential ethical pitfalls should we keep in mind during the negotiation?
22: Who are my competitors for this deal? How do our relative advantages and disadvantages compare?
23: What objective benchmarks, criteria, and precedents will support my preferred position?
24: Who should be on my negotiating team? Who should be our spokesperson? What specific responsibilities should each member have?
25 Do we need to involve any third parties (agents, lawyers, mediators, interpreters)?
26: What authority do I have (or does our team have) to make firm commitments?
27: Am I ready to engage in interest-based bargaining? Be prepared to try to create value by trading on differences in resources, preferences, forecasts, risk tolerance, and deadlines.
28: If we disagree about how the future plays out, can we explore a contingency contract (stipulate what will happen if each side’s prediction comes true)?
29: What parties not yet involved in the negotiation might also value an agreement?
30: Have I practiced communicating my message to the other side? How are they likely to respond?
3:1 Does the agenda make room for simultaneous discussion of multiple issues?
32: Is an agreement likely to create net value for society? How can we reduce potential harm to outside parties? Read full text:

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Guidelight.

Wireless and energy efficient lamp that changes from ambient lighting to work light. store.moma.org

Nap pillow.

SMELOV has created an adjustable desktop pillow for people wanting to catch some Zs while working at the office.
www.amazon.com

Geodome 4.

A unique geodesic dome tent that’s built to withstand the harshest elements –including 60 mph gusts of wind. By The North Face. www.amazon.com

Charles Mingus.

“Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that’s creativity.”
–Charles Mingus. (1922-1979). American jazz double bassist, pianist, composer and bandleader.

Know the keys to success

1. Being open to new things, preparation, planning, networking & a sprinkle of luck are key to success. —Dawn Clarke

2. Let it go! Let it go! Not saying let go of your education, but let go of the little stuff that tends to dictate whether or not you have a bad day in school. It’s HARD to do when you’re an adult, much less a kid. —Mary Gallagher

3. Don’t let anyone else define success for you. —Rick Wylie

4. You are the best advocate for yourself. —Tara Schurman
www.edutopia.org


BACHELOR OF Global Security Management

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL AND HUMAN STUDIES

The Bachelor of Global Security Management (BSc) program objective is to allow students to address both research and policy issues between theory, research creating a foundation in high level decision making responsibilities and critical thinking skills that can result in greater financial benefits. The Bachelor of Global Security Management (BSc) program is offered online via distance learning. After evaluating both academic record and life experience, AIU staff working in conjunction with Faculty and Academic Advisors will assist students in setting up a custom-made program, designed on an individual basis. This flexibility to meet student needs is seldom found in other distance learning programs. Our online program does not require all students to take the same subjects/courses, use the same books, or learning materials. Instead, the online Bachelor of Global Security Management (BSc) curriculum is designed individually by the student and academic advisor. It specifically addresses strengths and weaknesses with respect to market opportunities in the student’s major and intended field of work. Understanding that industry and geographic factors should influence the content of the curriculum instead of a standardized one-fits-all design is the hallmark of AIU’s unique approach to adult education. This philosophy addresses the dynamic and constantly changing environment of working professionals by helping adult students in reaching their professional and personal goals within the scope of the degree program.

Important:

Below is an example of the topics or areas you may develop and work on during your studies. By no means is it a complete or required list as AIU programs do not follow a standardized curriculum. It is meant solely as a reference point and example. Want to learn more about the curriculum design at AIU? Go ahead and visit our website, especially the Course and Curriculum section: http://aiu.edu/CourseCurriculum.html

Core Courses and Topics

Foreign Policy Decision Making
International Relations Theory
International Organizations
and Administration
Comparative Public Administration
International Political Economy
Defense and Strategic Studies
Global Issues Major Fields
Conflict and Conflict Resolution
International Affairs and Development
International Economic Affairs
International Law and Organizations
Global Health
International Security Studies
Technology Policy and
International Affairs
Recruitment Cycle
Advanced Analytical Methods
Advanced Open Source Intelligence
Surveillance and Countersurveillance
Intelligence Team Management
All Source Intelligenc
e Counterintelligence
Terrorism
Counterespionage
Counterterrorism
Intelligence Operations


Course and Curriculum

AIU has developed a protocol to quantify and qualify an individual’s professional background, as well as, their academic credentials, and grant academic credit to qualified students commensurate with their true level of knowledge.

Research Project

Bachelor Thesis Project
MBM300 Thesis Proposal
MBM302 Bachelor Thesis (5000 words)

Publication

Each graduate is encouraged to publish their research papers either online in the public domain or through professional journals and periodicals worldwide.

Contact us to get started

Submit your Online Application, paste your resume and any additional comments/ questions in the area provided.

aiu.edu/apply-online.html

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Publication.

Each Master graduate is encouraged to publish their research papers either online in the public domain or through professional journals and periodicals worldwide.


About Us

Accreditation

Atlantic International University offers distance learning degree programs for adult learners at bachelors, masters, and doctoral level. With self paced program taken online, AIU lifts the obstacles that keep professional adults from completing their educational goals. Programs are available throughout a wide range of majors and areas of study. All of this with a philosophically holistic approach towards education fitting within the balance of your life and acknowledging the key role each individual can play in their community, country, and the world. Atlantic International University is accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Schools, Colleges and Universities (ASIC). ASIC Accreditation is an internationally renowned quality standard for colleges and universities. Visit ASIC’s Directory of Accredited Colleges and Universities. ASIC is a member of CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG) in the USA, an approved accreditation body by the Ministerial Department of the Home Office in the UK, and is listed in the International Directory of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). AIU meets all state and federal laws as a degree-granting institution in the United States and the State of Hawaii. The University was legally established by corporate charter in 1998 and is in good standing.

While National Accreditation is common for traditional U.S. institutions of higher learning utilizing standard teaching methods, every country has its own standards and accrediting organizations. Accreditation is a voluntary process and does not guarantee a worthy education. Rather, it means an institution has submitted its courses, programs, budget, and educational objectives for review. AIU’s Distance Learning Programs are unique, non-traditional and not accredited by the U.S. Department of Education. This may be a determining factor for those individuals interested in pursuing certain disciplines requiring State licensing, (such as law, teaching, or medicine). It is recommended that you consider the importance of National Accreditation for your specific field or profession. Although Atlantic International University’s individualized Distance Learning Degree Programs, are distinct from traditional educational institutions, we are convinced of their value and acceptance worldwide. Non-traditional programs are important because they recognize knowledge gained outside the classroom and incorporate a broader more comprehensive view of the learning experience. Many great institutions are unaccredited. We invite you to compare our programs and philosophy with traditional classroom-based programs to determine which is best suited to your needs and budget. AIU has chosen private accreditation through the Accrediting Commission International (ACI), obtained in 1999. ACI is not regulated or approved by the US Department of Education. ATLANTIC INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY IS NOT ACCREDITED BY AN ACCREDITING AGENCY RECOGNIZED BY THE UNITED

STATES SECRETARY OF EDUCATION. Note: In the U.S., many licensing authorities require accredited degrees as the basis for eligibility for licensing. In some cases, accredited colleges may not accept for transfer courses and degrees completed at unaccredited colleges, and some employers may require an accredited degree as a basis for eligibility for employment. AIU is incorporated in the state of Hawaii. As a University based in the U.S., AIU meets all state and federal laws of the United States.

There is no distinction between the programs offered through AIU and those of traditional campus based programs with regards to the following: your degree, transcript and other graduation documents from AIU follow the same standard used by all U.S. colleges and universities. AIU graduation documents can include an apostille and authentication from the U.S. Department of State to facilitate their use internationally. Authentication from the U.S. Department of State is a process that will ultimately bind a letter signed by the U.S. Secretary of State (permanently with a metal ring) to your graduation documents. If a student outside the U.S. wishes to carry out a particular procedure within a country’s Department of Education regarding their degree earned at AIU, such procedures are to be carried out independently by the student. AIU respects the unique rules and regulations of each country and does not intervene or influence the respective authorities. We recommend prospective students who intend to carry out such procedures outside the U.S. to verify in detail the steps and requirements needed in order to be fully informed.

The AIU Difference

It is acknowledged that the act of learning is endogenous, (from within), rather than exogenous.

This fact is the underlying rationale for “Distance Learning”, in all of the programs offered by AIU. The combination of the underlying principles of student “self instruction”, (with guidance), collaborative development of curriculum unique to each student, and flexibility of time and place of study, provides the ideal learning environment to satisfy individual needs.

AIU is an institution of experiential learning and nontraditional education at a distance. There are no classrooms and attendance is not required.

Mission & Vision

MISSION:

To be a higher learning institution concerned about generating cultural development alternatives likely to be sustained in order to lead to a more efficient administration of the world village and its environment; exerting human and community rights through diversity with the ultimate goal of the satisfaction and evolution of the world.

VISION:

The empowerment of the individual towards the convergence of the world through a sustainable educational design based on andragogy and omniology.

Organizational Structure

Dr. Franklin Valcin
President/Academic Dean

Ricardo González
Chief Operation Officer
Ofelia Hernandez
Director of AIU
Clara Margalef
Dir. of Special Projects of AIU
Juan Pablo Moreno
Director of Operations
Paul Applebaum
IT Director
Nadeem Awan
Chief Programing
Dr. Jack Rosenzweig
Dean of Academic Affairs
Paula Vieria
Admissions Manager
Dr. Edward Lambert
Academic Coordinator
Dr. Ariadna Romero
Academic Coordinator
Maricela Esparza
Administrative Coordinator
Jaime Rotlewicz
Admissions Coordinator
Carlos Aponte
Telecom. Coordinator
Rosie Perez
Finance Coordinator
Nadia Gabaldon
Student Services Supervisor
Dr. José Mercado
Chief Executive Officer

Linda Collazo
Student Services Coordinator
Kingsley Zelee
IT Coordinator
Felipe Gomez
Design Director
Giovanni Castillo
Operations assistant
Liliana Peñaranda
Logistics Coordinator
Amalia Aldrett
Admissions Coordinator
Alba Ochoa
Admissions Coordinator
Sandra Garcia
Admissions Coordinator
Veronica Amuz
Admissions Coordinator
Junko Shimizu
Admissions Coordinator
Roberto Aldrett
Communications Coordinator
Nazma Sultana
Assistant Programming
Jhanzaib Awan
Assistant Programming
Chris Benjamin
Hosting Server
Dr. Ricardo González
Provost

Vivian Calderon
Registrar Office
Daritza Ysla
Accounting Coordinator
Patricia C. Domenech
Human Resources
Irina Ivashuk
Administrative Assistant
Kimberly Diaz
Academic Tutor
Renata Da Silva
Academic Tutor
Lourdes Puentes
Academic Tutor
Rina Lehnhoff
Academic Tutor
Renato Cifuentes
Academic Tutor
Arturo Vejar
Academic Tutor
Arhely Espinoza
Academic Tutor
Luisa Villar
Academic Tutor
Cyndy Dominguez
Academic Tutor
Paulina Garcia
Academic Assistant

School of Business and Economics

The School of Business and Economics allows aspiring and practicing professionals, managers, and entrepreneurs in the private and public sectors to complete a self paced distance learning degree program of the highest academic standard. The ultimate goal is to empower learners and help them take advantage of the enormous array of resources from the world environment in order to eliminate the current continuum of poverty and limitations. Degree programs are designed for those students whose professional experience has been in business, marketing, administration, economics, finance and management.

Areas of Study:

Accounting, Advertising, Banking, Business Administration, Communications, Ecommerce, Finance, Foreign Affairs, Home Economics, Human Resources, International Business, International Finance, Investing, Globalization, Marketing, Management, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Public Administrations, Sustainable Development, Public Relations, Telecommunications, Tourism, Trade.

School of Social and Human Studies

The School of Social and Human Studies is focused on to the development of studies which instill a core commitment to building a society based on social and economic justice and enhancing opportunities for human well being. The founding principles lie on the basic right of education as outlined in the Declaration of Human Rights. We instill in our students a sense of confidence and self reliance in their ability to access the vast opportunities available through information channels, the world wide web, private, public, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organizations in an ever expanding global community. Degree programs are aimed towards those whose professional life has been related to social and human behavior, with the arts, or with cultural studies.

Areas of Study:

Psychology, International Affairs, Sociology, Political Sciences, Architecture, Legal Studies, Public Administration, Literature and languages, Art History, Ministry, African Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Asian Studies, European Studies, Islamic Studies, Religious Studies.

School of Science and Engineering

The School of Science and Engineering seeks to provide dynamic, integrated, and challenging degree programs designed for those whose experience is in industrial research, scientific production, engineering and the general sciences. Our system for research and education will keep us apace with the twenty-first century reach scientific advance in an environmentally and ecologically responsible manner to allow for the sustainability of the human population. We will foster among our students a demand for ethical behavior, an appreciation for diversity, an understanding of scientific investigation,

Areas of Study:

Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics, Communications, Petroleum Science, Information Technology, Telecommunications, Nutrition Science, Agricultural Science, Computer Science, Sports Science, Renewable Energy, Geology, Urban Planning.

Online Library Resources

With access to a global catalog created and maintained collectively by more than 9,000 participating institutions, AIU students have secured excellent research tools for their study programs.

The AIU online library contains over 2 billion records and over 300 million bibliographic records that are increasing day by day. The sources spanning thousands of years and virtually all forms of human expression. There are files of all kinds, from antique inscribed stones to e-books, form wax engravings to MP3s, DVDs and websites. In addition to the archives, the library AIU Online offers electronic access to more than 149,000 e-books, dozens of databases and more than 13 million full-text articles with pictures included. Being able to access 60 databases and 2393 periodicals with more than 18 million items, guarantees the information required to perform the assigned research project. Users will find that many files are enriched with artistic creations on the covers, indexes, reviews, summaries and other information. The records usually have information attached from important libraries. The user can quickly assess the relevance of the information and decide if it is the right source.

Education on the 21st century

AIU is striving to regain the significance of the concept of education, which is rooted into the Latin “educare”, meaning “to pull out”, breaking loose from the paradigm of most 21st century universities with their focus on “digging and placing information” into students’ heads rather than teaching them to think. For AIU, the generation of “clones” that some traditional universities are spreading throughout the real world is one of the most salient reasons for today’s ills. In fact, students trained at those educational institutions never feel a desire to “change the world” or the current status quo; instead, they adjust to the environment, believe everything is fine, and are proud of it all.

In a world where knowledge and mostly information expire just like milk, we must reinvent university as a whole in which each student, as the key player, is UNIQUE within an intertwined environment. This century’s university must generate new knowledge bits although this may entail its separation from both the administrative bureaucracy and the faculty that evolve there as well. AIU thinks that a university should be increasingly integrated into the “real world”, society, the economy, and the holistic human being. As such, it should concentrate on its ultimate goal, which is the student, and get him/her deeply immersed into a daily praxis of paradigm shifts, along with the Internet and research, all these being presently accessible only to a small minority of the world community. AIU students must accomplish their self-learning mission while conceptualizing it as the core of daily life values through the type of experiences that lead to a human being’s progress when information is converted into education. The entire AIU family must think of the university as a setting that values diversity and talent in a way that trains mankind not only for the present but above all for a future that calls everyday for professionals who empower themselves in academic and professional areas highly in demand in our modern society. We shall not forget that, at AIU, students are responsible for discovering their own talents and potential, which they must auto-develop in such a way that the whole finish product opens up as a flower that blossoms every year more openly.

The AIU stance is against the idea of the campus as a getaway from day-to-day pressure since we believe reality is the best potential-enhancer ever; one truly learns through thinking, brainstorming ideas, which leads to new solutions, and ultimately the rebirth of a human being fully integrated in a sustainable world environment. Self-learning is actualized more from within than a top-down vantage point, that is to say, to influence instead of requesting, ideas more than power. We need to create a society where solidarity, culture, life, not political or economic rationalism and more than techno structures, are prioritized. In short, the characteristics of AIU students and alumni remain independence, creativity, self-confidence, and ability to take risk towards new endeavors. This is about people’s worth based not on what they know but on what they do with what they know.

Read more at: www.aiu.edu

AIU Service

AIU offers educational opportunities in the USA to adults from around the world so that they can use their own potential to manage their personal, global cultural development. The foundational axis of our philosophy lies upon self-actualized knowledge and information, with no room for obsoleteness, which is embedded into a DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEM based on ANDRAGOGY and OMNIOLOGY.

The ultimate goal of this paradigm is to empower learners and help them take advantage of the enormous array of resources from the world environment in order to eliminate the current continuum of poverty and limitations.

This will become a crude reality with respect for, and practice of, human and community rights through experiences, investigations, practicum work, and/ or examinations. Everything takes place in a setting that fosters diversity; with advisors and consultants with doctorate degrees and specializations in Human Development monitor learning processes, in addition to a worldwide web of colleagues and associations, so that they can reach the satisfaction and the progress of humanity with peace and harmony.

Contact us to get started

Now, it’s possible to earn your degree in the comfort of your own home. For additional information or to see if you qualify for admissions please contact us.

Pioneer Plaza / 900 Fort Street Mall 410
Honolulu, HI 96813
800-993-0066 (Toll Free in US) [email protected]
808-924-9567 (Internationally) www.aiu.edu

Online application:

www.aiu.edu/apply3_phone.aspx